ERG & Council Honors Award™ Application Is Now Open!

The ERG & Council Honors Award™ is the premiere annual national award that recognizes, honors and celebrates the outstanding contributions and achievements of Employee Resource Groups and Diversity Councils. These groups lead the diversity and inclusion process within their organizations and demonstrate results in their workforce, workplace and marketplace. Continue reading ERG & Council Honors Award™ Application Is Now Open!

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‘Jane the Virgin’ actor Jaime Camil talks Latino stereotypes and Mexican cinema in the era of Trump

It’s easy to say that 2017 has already been a landmark year for Jane the Virgin. Shall we count the ways? 1. Actress Gina Rodriguez, who plays the titular character, was up for a Golden Globe. 2. The show’s highly anticipated midseason premiere aired on Jan. 23. 3. The telenovela was renewed for season four. Oh, and 4. A major character died. It has been a banner year and February has barely begun. Continue reading ‘Jane the Virgin’ actor Jaime Camil talks Latino stereotypes and Mexican cinema in the era of Trump

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Jorge Ramos- Influential TV journalist advocates nonstop for the Latino Community

By Erica Sabino

Jorge Ramos, an award-winning TV journalist, is one of the most recognized Latino leaders in America. He was hailed “Star newscaster of Hispanic TV” by Wall Street Journal in 2000 and was part of Time magazine’s list of the “25 Most Influential Hispanics in the United States” in 2005. More recently, he was placed on Fortune’s 2016 list of “World’s 50 Greatest Leaders” and was the only U.S. journalist to be included. Continue reading Jorge Ramos- Influential TV journalist advocates nonstop for the Latino Community

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Cesar Millan- With a new show and engagement, Cesar’s “pack” is complete!

It’s been six years since one of the greatest canine trainers in the world appeared on our cover for Hispanic Network Magazine. In our 2010 Summer issue, we featured our conversation with celerity dog behaviorist Cesar Millan, in which he talked about his inspiration for working with dogs, how he came about introducing that work into show business, and even advice on what to do if you’re a first-time dog owner. Remember folks, it’s “exercise, discipline, and then affection!” Continue reading Cesar Millan- With a new show and engagement, Cesar’s “pack” is complete!

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Trailblazer Gaby Moreno: From Guatemala to Grammy Nominee

No one was more surprised than indie pop artist Gaby Moreno when she stunned the Latin music world last December with her Grammy nomination for Best Latin Pop Album. In the realm of slick productions and digital overdubs overseen by a crew of producers, Moreno’s fifth album, Ilusión breaks the mold with a rootsy, old-school one-take analog approach. Continue reading Trailblazer Gaby Moreno: From Guatemala to Grammy Nominee

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Why Netflix’s One Day At A Time Is More Than A “Latino Reboot”

In the iconic words of Zoolander: Reboots are so hot right now.

From Fuller House to Gilmore Girls, streaming giant Netflix appears to be committed to squeezing every last drop of nostalgic attachment out of the shows you love. Sometimes, this does not turn out so hot. Other times, it’s the answer to your pop cultural prayers.

One Day at a Time
is a perfect example of the latter — as well as what a reboot done right looks like. The original elements of the Norman Lear-produced 1970s sitcom are all there: a single mom raising her kids with the help of a live-in grandmother and regular pop-ins from the charming (if emotionally) needy landlord.

But in this case, it’s the departures from the original that make the new One Day at a Time worth watching. The show stars Justina Machado as Penelope Alvarez, a 38-year-old Cuban-American Afghanistan war veteran, living with her family in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Her kids — 14-year-old Elena (Isabella Gomez) and 12-year-old Alex (Marcel Ruiz) — attend Catholic school while Penelope works as a nurse in the office of the goofy Dr. Berkowitz (Stephen Tobolowsky). When Penelope leaves her husband, who re-enlisted for another tour after refusing to seek treatment for substance abuse and PTSD, her mother, Lydia, moves in to help. (And by help, I mean meddle, in the way only matriarchs can.)

The best part? Grandma Lydia is portrayed by Rita Moreno. From the moment Lydia dramatically parts the curtain separating her bed from the rest of the living room, she dances to her own salsa-inspired beat. She’s amazing in her role, and thankfully the rest of the cast is just as good. Penelope is funny and touching as a mom struggling to make ends meet while still spending time with her kids. Elena, her smart and fiercely feminist daughter, is grounded and earnest as she questions her sexuality. Alex, the baby of the family who could so easily have fallen into the trap of flat TV sons (*cough* Bobby Draper) reminded me so much of my own brother that I couldn’t help but applaud his gigantic (but oh-so-charming) ego and sneakerhead ways. Scheider (Todd Grinnell), the bougie landlord in Warby Parker glasses who spends more time in the Alvarez apartment than he does his own, is useless as a handyman but a refreshing fatherly presence, if in a man-child, GenX way.

But despite the fact that One Day at a Time deals with universal issues, almost every headline announcing its comeback qualified the show as Latino. And while calling it out as the “Latino One Day at a Time” isn’t technically wrong — the Alvarez family is proudly Cuban-American and don’t anyone forget it — that label overshadows the series’ shine, and wrongly curbs its mass market appeal. Refinery29 spoke to series executive producer Gloria Calderón Kellett and leading lady Justina Machado about why One Day at a Time is so much more than a “Latino reboot” — and what it took to seamlessly translate this iconic classic into the new Golden Age of Television.

Continue onto Refinery 29 to read an interview with Justina Machado.

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