SACNAS will be hosting the 2020 National Diversity in STEM Conference coming to Long Beach, CA

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SACNAS Partner Reception

The Society for Advancing Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans (SACNAS) is excited to be hosting the 2020 National Diversity in STEM Conference in Long Beach, CA on February 25! Come learn about partnership opportunities and ways to optimize your presence.

Your partnership is critical to the conference success and engaging diverse students and professionals in STEM.

We anticipate 5000+ attendees and are developing the partnership advisory group consisting of local and regionally based institutions and companies to help guide programming.

In addition, we have developed a cultural advisory committee to ensure that we take into consideration the cultural context of the region. Our goal is to continue to serve as a bridge for academia, government, and industry in achieving diversity, equity, and inclusion.

For more information, visit sacnas.org

New Article Shows Tribal Colleges and Universities’ Unique Role in Building American Indian Nations

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american indian college fund logo

Denver, Colo., February 2, 2020—Tribal colleges and universities are unlike any other higher education institution. Cheryl Crazy Bull, president and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, wanted to tell the story of how these remarkable institutions serving Indian reservation communities provide an education to the nation’s most underserved student population—while also supporting the process of rebuilding tribal identity and tribal nations. Crazy Bull gathered four tribal college presidents and experts in Native higher education to share how they do this work in their diverse tribal communities. The result of their work, titled “Tribal Colleges and Universities: Building Nations, Revitalizing Identity,” has been published in Change: The Magazine of Higher Education, Volume 52, 2020.

The article is co-authored by Crazy Bull, who also served as a tribal college president for 10 years at Northwest Indian College in Washington state, with veteran tribal college educators and presidents Dr. Cynthia Lindquist, Cankdeska Cikana Community College, North Dakota; Raymond Burns, Leech Lake Tribal College, Minnesota; Dr. Laurel Vermillion, Sitting Bull College, serving the Standing Rock Nation in North Dakota and South Dakota; and Dr. Leander “Russ” McDonald, United Tribes Technical College, North Dakota.

The article takes an in-depth look at the distinctive but overlapping approaches four tribal colleges use that support tribal nation-building. The narratives focus on how the presidents’ institutions work impacts their communities, such as culturally competent health and wellness programming, economic revitalization, workforce development, language restoration, community capacity building, and tribal governance.

Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) are tribally controlled institutions with unique characteristics – a majority American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) student enrollment, predominately or entirely Native governing boards, culturally rooted curriculum, community-driven programming, and a commitment to tribal self-determination.

Copies of the article are available online at Taylor and Francis at https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00091383.2020.1693819.

About Cheryl Crazy Bull

Cheryl Crazy Bull is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the American Indian College Fund, headquartered in Denver, Colorado. Her experience and research are primarily with and about tribally controlled education and leadership.

About Cynthia Lindquist

Cynthia Lindquist is the President of Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Spirit Lake, North Dakota. In addition to her higher education administration expertise, she shares her knowledge about community-based research, health and wellness, and equity through presentations and publications.

About Raymond Burns

Raymond Burns is President of Leech Lake Tribal College in Minnesota. His primary focus has always been on finding ways for Native students to achieve their academic best and help rebuild Indigenous communities to the status and importance that they once had.

About Laurel Vermillion

Laurel Vermillion is President of Sitting Bull College, located on the Standing Rock Nation straddling south central North Dakota and north central South Dakota. A former elementary teacher, Laurel is particularly focused on language revitalization and building community-wide initiatives that restore cultural practices and knowledge.

About Leander McDonald

Leander “Russ” McDonald is President of United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck, North Dakota. Russ has served as Chairman of the Spirit Lake Dakota and as a regional representative to the National Congress of American Indians. He is an experienced researcher and promotes tribal self-determination through education and outreach.

About the American Indian College Fund

Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, and over $221 million in scholarships and community support since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

American Indian College Fund Publishes Free Career Planning Guide

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Free career guide cover for American Indian College Fund with Native American woman in traditional dress on the cover

Native American college students have unique needs and challenges in higher education. Navigating their developing career paths while honoring their indigenous identities and communities is no different. To help Native students plan for and accomplish their career goals in college and at any stage of life, the American Indian College Fund has published a new “Career Pathways” guidebook.

While many career planning resources exist to help students prepare for work, the new “Career Pathways” guidebook was created by the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) to provide tailored resources and advice to meet the unique needs of indigenous students. The guide is filled with culturally relevant career preparation resources, including the advice of Native professionals and teachers shared from their own valuable experience. Tom Brooks (Mohawk), Vice President of External Affairs at AT&T and a member of the College Fund’s Board of Trustees, introduces the publication with his own inspirational journey through education, career possibilities, and the fulfillment of his current path.

The “Career Pathways” guidebook includes articles on identifying career goals, finding internships, applying to graduate school, studying for a skilled trade certification, interviewing skills, the advantages of joining a professional association, planning a career in Indian Country, and more. All articles are written with insight into Native culture, such as incorporating indigenous style into professional wardrobes and finding careers that reflect Native graduates’ cultural, tribal, and personal values.

Career Pathways is available free of charge at www.collegefund.org/careerpathways. The new publication is a key to career readiness programs implemented at select tribal colleges and universities nationwide and will be distributed at the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC) Legislative Summit in Washington, D.C., February 3-7, 2020, and AIHEC’s Student Conference in March 2020 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. High school and college educators, career counselors, and Native student centers are encouraged to share the publication with their students.

About AT&T: AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) is a diversified, global leader in telecommunications, media and entertainment, and technology. It executes in the market under four operating units. WarnerMedia is a leading media and entertainment company that creates and distributes premium and popular content to global audiences through its consumer brands including HBO, Warner Bros., TNT, TBS, truTV, CNN, DC Entertainment, New Line, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim, Turner Classic Movies and others. AT&T Communications provides more than 100 million U.S. consumers with entertainment and communications experiences across TV, mobile and broadband services. Plus, it serves nearly 3 million business customers with high-speed, highly secure connectivity and smart solutions. AT&T Latin America provides pay-TV services across 11 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean, and is the fastest growing wireless provider in Mexico, serving consumers and businesses. Xandr provides marketers with innovative and relevant advertising solutions for consumers around premium video content and digital advertising through its AppNexus platform.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

Finding a Place to Belong at Yale and Beyond

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Alanna Pyke headshot

By Susan Gonzalez/Yale News

“Community” is the word graduating senior Alanna Pyke utters most often when reflecting on her time at Yale College.

“What I really came to value here is a sense of community and being a part of something that is bigger than myself,” says Pyke of her Yale experience.

For Pyke, one of the most valuable communities was the one she found at the Native American Cultural Center (NACC), the place that inspired her to choose Yale out of the more than 15 colleges that accepted her, and where she experienced a deep sense of belonging. She was impressed by the fact that an entire building was dedicated for the NACC.

“The Native community and also Dean [Kelly] Fayard [assistant dean of Yale College and director of the NACC] were such a huge part of my Yale experience,” says Pyke. “The NACC at 26 High St. is a welcoming place, where you can go to relax or study or see friends. I spent a lot of time there.”

Pyke — the first Native student to be valedictorian of Massena Central High School in New York — says that no one in recent memory from her high school or her reservation had gone to Yale. Feeling supported on campus, while maintaining a connection to her indigenous roots, was important to her.

A member of the Akwesasne Mohawk Nation, Pyke grew up in upstate New York on the Akwesasne Reservation, which straddles the New York and Canadian border along the St. Lawrence River. Prior to seventh grade, she went to an elementary school on the reservation where she was taught the Mohawk language.

At her next school, which was predominantly white, Mohawk was not taught; Pyke was told that she could study French or Spanish instead.

“I remember crying when I found that out,” the Yale senior recalls. “I didn’t know why I was crying at the time but I know I thought it was a big deal that I couldn’t continue learning Mohawk. I eventually realized why it was a big deal: At school, I was no longer connected to my culture.”

As a first-year student at Yale, Pyke had a job as a first-year liaison at the NACC, helping new students feel welcome at the center. She soon found herself spending time there after her shift, and was encouraged by other Native students to attend special events or meetings or to take on leadership roles.

While she says she was initially “a little too shy” to hold an official post, she quickly found herself a member of the NACC-affiliated Association for Native American Students at Yale (ANAAY), the American Indian Science & Engineering Society, Yale Sisters of All Nations, and the Yale Native American Arts Council.

Pyke, who is majoring in molecular, cellular, and development biology (MCDB), acknowledges that it was sometimes challenging to balance her studies, research commitments, and leadership duties in the Native community. She says she is grateful for having the opportunity to study Mohawk at Yale (via the Native American Language Program) and was active in a student campaign to lobby the Yale administration to offer for-credit courses in indigenous languages.

As a woman of color in STEM, the Yale senior says the mentors she had in the sciences were vital to her success, and she is particularly thankful for the Science, Technology and Research Scholars (STARS) Program, which supports women, minority, economically underprivileged, and other historically underrepresented students in the sciences, engineering, and mathematics.

In addition to mentoring, the program provides research opportunities, networking, courses and workshops, and career planning to undergraduates in STEM disciplines.

While participating in a STARS Summer Research Program, she took a science course co-taught by a group of faculty members including Marina Moreno, associate research scientist and instructor in MCDB, who became Pyke’s faculty adviser. Moreno is also one of the STARS coordinators.

“She helped me through this entire endeavor of getting an education,” says Pyke. “Without the STARS program, there’s a big chance I wouldn’t have stayed in STEM. I don’t think I would have made it without Dr. Moreno and STARS mentor Rob Fernandez.”

This summer, Pyke will begin Harvard University’s Research Scholar Initiative, a post-baccalaureate program to enhance scholars’ competitiveness for Ph.D. programs. She is interested in continuing genetics or genomics research in the future.

“Many Native communities have a distrust of science generally and of genetic science in particular,” says Pyke. “It’s been used wrongly in the past, or used without consent.”

Pyke hopes to give back to her own community through scholarship. “Representation is important because it will inspire future generations of Native scholarship and scientists, and add diverse perspectives to different fields,” she says.

Source: news.yale.edu

I Was ‘Too Much’ for Boarding School. But I Had the Garcia Sisters.

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Vanessa Martir novelist pictured The author and her family at Palmetto Street in Bushwick, Brooklyn

Reading books by Latina writers taught me our stories were worthy of being told.

I grew up in Bushwick, Brooklyn, in the 1980s, in what felt like a forgotten neighborhood. Abandoned buildings loomed over piles of garbage and rubble. Playgrounds were overrun by drug dealers. But for me, Bushwick was a place imbued with my culture. There were piragua carts with multicolored umbrellas selling shaved ice on every corner. The bodeguero Miguel gave my mother credit when our food stamps ran out. The Puerto Rican flag hung from almost every window.

My mother migrated from Honduras to New York in 1971. When I was 2 years old my mother met and fell in love with another woman, Millie, which was then widely considered taboo. Two years later we all moved into a two-bedroom railroad-style apartment. The paint cracked and peeled off the walls, but we always had food on the table, even if it was white rice, fried eggs and canned corned beef. I spent most of my time then in our backyard, climbing the plum tree and telling myself stories.

My life took a turn at 13 when my social studies teacher saw promise in me and suggested I take part in A Better Chance, a program that places low-income minority students in top schools around the country. I applied and was offered a four-year scholarship to attend a boarding-school-type program at Wellesley High School in Massachusetts.

Millie’s brother drove me to school in a beat-up blue Pentecostal church van. I remember gazing out the window in awe as gorgeous mansions with perfect manicured lawns came into view. I moved into a four-story house with other students complete with a study and fireplace. It felt like I was living in an episode of The Facts of Life.

But I soon realized that I was different. My guidance counselor would often pull me aside and tell me I was “too loud” and “too much.” My classmates would chant “Tawk, Rosie, tawk!” as I’d walk down the hallways, my eyes glued to the ground. Rosie Perez as Tina in the 1989 film “Do The Right Thing” was the only exposure to a Latina many of my classmates had ever had.

Growing up, I’d read the “Sweet Valley High” series, Encyclopedia Brown mysteries and all the Judy Blume books. The characters in them didn’t look like me, but I was too young to understand the difference or know it could matter. One day in my junior year, I was reading on the mezzanine overlooking the cafeteria, when my English professor, Mr. Goddard, approached me. “You should read this,” he said and handed me “How the Garcia Girls Lost Their Accents.” My eyes stopped at the writer’s name, Julia Alvarez. “That’s a Spanish name,” I thought.

I saw myself reflected in the story of the Garcia sisters, who had fled to the United States from the Dominican Republic with their parents. They went to boarding school and, like me, had trouble fitting in. It began to dawn on me that there must be other writers like Ms. Alvarez out there. I asked teachers for recommendations and dug through the library shelves on campus.

Later I would discover the work of Gloria Anzaldúa, Cherríe Moraga, Sandra Cisneros. What was missing for me was the narrative of the Latina who left the ’hood to pursue an education only to find that she no longer fit in anywhere. I was too loud at boarding school and a sellout in the place I had once called home.

Continue on to the New York Times to read the complete article.

Photo: The author (in blue shorts) and her family at Palmetto Street in Bushwick, Brooklyn, in June 1983.

Photo Credit…New York Times/Meryl Meisler

Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation Announces the Julio Iglesias Scholarship

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Julio Iglesias in tuxedo smiling clapping hands with joy

A Music Student with Financial Hardship Will Receive a Four-Year Scholarship, Worth up to $200,000 USD Toward a Bachelor’s Degree at Berklee College of Music in Boston

Deadline to Apply is April 10, 2020 

MIAMI (DEC. 16, 2019)— The Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation® announced today that it is accepting applications for the Julio Iglesias Scholarship from music students admitted to Berklee College of Music who are interested in Latin music. The four-year Prodigy Scholarship, which holds a maximum value of $200,000 USD, was created five years ago in an effort to support music education and Latin music genres, and will be awarded to a student who is exceptionally gifted and needs financial assistance to complete a bachelor’s degree in music starting in the Fall 2020 semester.

Julio Iglesias is considered an enduring star on the world stage and the best-selling Latin artist of all time. Recipient of a GRAMMY®, 2001 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year™ honor, and the Recording Academy® Lifetime Achievement Award in 2019, the singer/songwriter has recorded in multiple languages and sold more than 300 million records worldwide.

“I’m proud to offer a promising student the opportunity of a formal music education at one of the best schools in the world through the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation,” said Iglesias. “Through this scholarship, I hope to expand my legacy helping to build the next generation of Latin music ambassadors.”

“We are pleased to announce our sixth annual Prodigy Scholarship in association with music legend Julio Iglesias,” said Manolo Díaz, Senior Vice President, Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation. “We are grateful for Julio’s support and commitment to inspire future generations of Latin artists to achieve greatness.”

Every year, the Foundation’s Scholarship Committee carefully evaluates applications from a highly competitive pool of aspiring musicians on a variety of skills and under rigorous policies. As of today, the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation has allocated a remarkable $5 million USD in scholarships, grants, musical instrument donations, and educational events worldwide. Previous artists who have co-sponsored Prodigy Scholarships include Enrique Iglesias (2015), Juan Luis Guerra (2016), Miguel Bosé (2017), Carlos Vives (2018), and Emilio and Gloria Estefan (2019).

For application, guidelines, and for the latest news, please visit the official website of the Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation at www.latingrammyculturalfoundation.com.  As part of the process, students must complete two audition videos, submit two letters of recommendation and answer two essay questions. The materials can be submitted in English, Spanish or Portuguese.  The deadline to apply is April 10, 2020, by 11:59 p.m. EDT. After reviewing the guidelines that can be found on our website, submit any questions to LGCF@grammy.com.

ABOUT THE LATIN GRAMMY CULTURAL FOUNDATION:
The Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation was established by The Latin Recording Academy® to promote international awareness and appreciation of the significant contributions of Latin music and its makers to the world’s culture, and to protect its rich musical legacy and heritage. The Foundation’s primary charitable focus is to provide scholarships to students interested in Latin music, as well as grants to scholars and organizations worldwide for research and preservation of diverse Latin music genres. Take action in supporting our mission by donating today via our Facebook page. For additional information, please visit us at www.latingrammyculturalfoundation.com. For the latest news and exclusive content, follow us at @latingrammyfdn on Twitter and Instagram, and Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation on Facebook.

ABOUT BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC:
Berklee was founded on the revolutionary principle that the best way to prepare students for careers in music is through the study and practice of contemporary music. For 70 years, the college has evolved to reflect the current state of the music industry, leading the way with baccalaureate studies in performance, music business/management, songwriting, music therapy, film scoring, and more. In June 2016, the Boston Conservatory merged with Berklee, creating the world’s most comprehensive and dynamic training ground for music, dance, theater, and related professions. With a focus on global learning, the Berklee campus in Valencia, Spain, offers graduate programs and study abroad opportunity, while Berklee Online serves distance learners worldwide with extension classes and degree-granting programs. The Berklee City Music Network provides after-school programming for underserved teens in more than 40 locations throughout the U.S. and Canada. With a student body representing more than 100 countries, abundant international undergraduate and graduate student populations (33 and 53 percent respectively), and alumni and faculty who have won more than 360 GRAMMY and Latin GRAMMY Awards, Berklee is the world’s premier learning lab for the music of today—and tomorrow. Learn more at berklee.edu.

ABOUT JULIO IGLESIAS: 
Julio Iglesias is the most celebrated artist in Spanish and Latin music history. Recipient of a GRAMMY, The Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year in 2001, and the Recording Academy™ Lifetime Achievement Award in 2019, Iglesias is the best-selling Latin artist of all time with more than 300 million records sold in 14 languages. Photo Credit: Jesús Carrero

Meet Raquel Aldana: A Leader Increasing Hispanic Representation

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Raquel Aldana Headshot

By Dateline Staff

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities has chosen UC Davis’ Raquel Aldana as one of 24 fellows for the association’s inaugural Presidential Leadership Academy (La Academia de Liderazgo), designed to increase Hispanic representation in presidential positions in higher education.

Aldana joined UC Davis in 2017 as a professor of law and associate vice chancellor for academic diversity (which is now part of the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion). She is co-chair of the campus’s Hispanic-Serving Institution Task Force.

La Academia is a direct response to the declining percentage of Hispanic university presidents (from 4.5 percent in 2006 to 3.9 percent in 2016), despite the unprecedented growth of U.S. Hispanic college student enrollment, officials of the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities, or HACU, said in a news release announcing the inaugural class of fellows for La Academia de Liderazgo.

The fellows will participate in an array of leadership development activities designed to prepare them for leadership roles in the full spectrum of institutions of higher learning, but with a focus on leadership positions within Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Emerging HSIs.

“The Presidential Leadership Academy, La Academia de Liderazgo, meets HACU’s mission to champion Hispanic success in Hispanic higher education,” said Antonio R. Flores, the association’s president and chief executive officer. “By preparing more Latinos/Latinas for leadership roles with a special focus on Hispanic-Serving Institutions, HACU and the fellows who participate will have a profound impact on the students they serve and the institutions they lead.”

The one-year fellowship program includes three seminars—the first took place in October in conjunction with HACU’s 33rd annual conference, “Championing Hispanic Higher Education Success: Meeting the Challenge of Prosperity and Equality,” in Chicago.

More than a dozen nationally recognized current and emeriti presidents and senior-level administrators will serve on the academy’s faculty. Mentorship with a university president will be a key component, as will be the development of a special project designed to have an impact at each fellow’s institution.

Source: ucdavis.edu

Prospanica creates scholarship fund, assisting students pursuing undergraduate and post-graduate degrees

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Prospanica logo

Empowerment. It’s a cornerstone of Prospanica’s mission. Founded in 1988, Prospanica, formally the National Society of Hispanic MBAs, strives to empower the Hispanic and Latin community to achieve its full professional, educational and social potential. At a time when minimal diversity was seen at the executive level in business, Prospanica knew they needed to make a significant investment in the next generation of leaders.

Thus, the organization created its scholarship fund, assisting students pursuing undergraduate and post-graduate degrees. Since 1989 Prospanica has granted more than $5 million in scholarship funds to Hispanic and Latinx students who have entrepreneurial aspirations.

Through this fund, Prospanica has had the opportunity to have a great effect on the lives of countless students from across the nation, all with different backgrounds. Who are these students? They are the first of their family to attend college; they are DACA recipients; they are community leaders and activists; they are mothers and fathers going back to school later in life. Through the gift of the scholarship, Prospanica is connecting with the community in a meaningful way, aiding dreams as they become reality, empowering students.

Kevin Garcia

At a young age, Kevin Garcia understood the importance of education and entrepreneurship. His parents, immigrants from Mexico, instilled in him the belief of striving to be the best possible version of himself in every situation. This belief followed him on the weekends when he helped his family with their booth at the local flea market and every weekday at school. It would eventually shape his dreams to work in a field that would one day allow him to support his family.

“My parents sacrificed a lot for us, and I believe that getting a college degree is my way of paying back my family’s sacrifices,” Kevin said.

Kevin is currently pursuing a dual degree in finance and psychology at the University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign. He was first introduced to Prospanica in 2017 after a schoolmate approached him about starting a chapter at their school, and once he learned more about the organization, he was hooked. He has been extremely active in his community and is honored to receive the 2019 Prospanica Scholarship.

“Knowing that being a part of an organization that invests in the education of [the Hispanic] community reinforces my commitment to [Prospanica and] advocating for our community,” he said.

With the help of this scholarship, Kevin will be able to continue his educational aspirations and his work in the community. Kevin is also the president of the Illinois Coalition Assisting Undocumented Students’ Education, an organization comprised of undocumented and DACA students dedicated to assisting others in their educational pursuits.

Roshelle Savdie Lechter

As she began her master’s degree in international business at Brandeis International Business School, Roshelle Savdie Lechter felt the weight of financial commitment required to continue her education. She was first introduced to Prospanica Boston through a friend, and as she spent more time in the organization, the more she identified with the sense of community Prospanica had cultivated. During this time, she had learned of and applied for the scholarship and was blown away by Prospanica’s generosity when she was selected as a recipient.

“Being in school for [five] years entails a huge financial responsibility, and thanks to the Prospanica scholarship and help from Brandeis International Business School, I was able to complete my studies,” Roshelle remembers.

Since completing her master’s degree, Roshelle moved to New York City and is now a content marketing specialist for Yopo.

Prospanic scholardhips winners 2019

Empowering the Next Generation of Leaders

Like Kevin and Roshelle, scholarship recipients often are very active in their communities, giving time and energy to improve their cities one step at a time. They go on to leadership positions at Fortune 500 companies. Through this crucial investment, Prospanica has been able to help add much-needed diversity to corporate America.

These major advancements do not happen within a vacuum. To truly affect change, Prospanica understood that they needed to work directly with those who would one day be employing these students. They began to partner with several major corporate partners with the same diversity goals as Prospanica. Microsoft, John Deere, and ExxonMobil stepped up to the plate in 2019 with generous contributions to the Prospanica Scholarship fund. These are only a few of the many corporations who’ve made a significant financial contribution to the fund.

While the immediate result and satisfaction is apparent, the Prospanica Scholarship benefit goes deeper than just to the recipients. Having a rich diversity at the executive level of major corporations provides young students and upcoming entrepreneurs role models with whom they closely identify. This, in turn, empowers the next generation to continue their educational endeavors, leave legacies of their own, and invest in their communities.

Learn more about the Prospanica Scholarship at prospanica.com/scholarship. The Prospanica Foundation is a 501(c)(3) organization. Donations made to the Foundation are tax-deductible and go to programs like the Prospanica Scholarship. More information on the Foundation can be found at prospanica.org/donations/.

Showing Latino Students “You Can Do It!”

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Hernandez interacts with a participant in the Pursuing Urban Sustainability at Home program, a camp she helped facilitate this summer

By Stacy Braukman

Cuba native Diley (Dyla) Hernandez was in high school when she became fascinated by psychology and decided she wanted to pursue it as a field of study. Her father, who was a musician, and the rest of her family had not attended college and didn’t know how to help her get into the University of Havana.

“I had to figure that out myself,” she said. And she did.

Today, Hernandez is a senior research scientist at the Center for Education Integrating Science, Mathematics, and Computing (CEISMC), where she serves as the program director for GoSTEM, which aims to strengthen the pipeline of Latino students into postsecondary education. She is also the director for Culturally Authentic Practice to Advance Computational Thinking in Youth (CAPACiTY), an NSF grant-funded program to develop the new curriculum for the Introduction to Digital Technology course taught in Georgia high schools.

“My work is a combination of research, curriculum development, and teacher professional development,” she explains. “I have the great luck to actually be able to implement programs and strategies to help students in K-12 deal with a lot of the social and psychological consequences that prevent them from pursuing careers in STEM.”

Hernandez says her work is most fulfilling “when we actually get to talk to the students who are in our programs and we see in action the work that we’ve been doing, or hear from the students about the impact of that work. You realize that what you’re doing matters to people; that it’s actually making a difference in their lives, even if it’s small.”

Diley Hernandez headshot
Diley Hernandez

She describes one event that is especially important to her: the Annual Latino College and STEM Fair, which attracts between 500 and 1,000 Latino students and their families. Held at the Student Center, the event helps attendees envision a future at Georgia Tech—and feel like they belong.

“Sometimes, when they’re having conversations and they’re asking questions as part of this event, you feel like the stories of other Latino professionals, STEM leaders, and faculty really resonate with the students,” says Hernandez. “And you can see on their faces, ‘That is possible for me,’ or ‘I could do this.’ It’s like a little light that turns on. You can see the magic of something wonderful happening. Just to be able to be part of that is very rewarding.”

She sees a lot of potential at CEISMC and is committed to making an impact on the educational lives of Georgia students through innovative teaching methods, particularly in STEM fields. “It is an incredible opportunity to bring about real change,” said Hernandez.

Source: news.gatech.edu

MBA Salaries Hit Record High

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Latina college student smiling carry books and a backpack

MBA degrees cost a lot of money. Harvard’s MBA will set you back by $150,000 in tuition fees alone. But increasingly, it looks like the heavy investment is worth it.

In the United States, starting salaries for MBA graduates after business school have hit a record high this year, according to new data from the Graduate Management Admission Council’s Corporate Recruiters Survey 2019.

According to GMAC, the median annual base starting salary U.S. employers plan to offer new MBA hires is $115,000, more than double the median for new bachelor’s degree hires.

GMAC’s report is based on survey of 1,202 employers of graduate business school students in 45 countries worldwide and covers hiring patterns for graduates across programs—MBA and specialized masters—industries, and regions.

Here, we highlight how MBA salaries are changing around the world; we report on MBA and masters hiring trends; and we tell you which countries are most welcoming when it comes to hiring international students. Clue: it’s not the United States.

Average MBA starting salaries vary considerably by world region. The median annual base salary that European companies plan to offer new MBA hires this year is $95,000, and the median for Asia-Pacific companies is $45,000—less than half of what’s on offer in the United States.

Employers in the Asia-Pacific (63 percent) and the United States (56 percent) are more likely to plan to increase MBA starting salaries this year compared with European employers (49 percent).

Among U.S. employers, median MBA starting salaries are highest in the consulting ($135,000) and finance ($125,000) industries, consistent with global trends. Employers in the Northeast tend to offer the highest salaries, with lower salaries in the South.

Signing bonuses are offered by more than half of U.S. companies (58 percent with an average signing bonus of over $10,000) and about a third of companies Europe and the Asia-Pacific. Benefit packages vary by world region.

Although master’s degrees are becoming more popular, MBA graduates—usually at a later stage of their careers—can expect to earn more. While U.S. companies plan to offer a median annual base starting salary of $80,000 to Master in Management hires, European employers plan to offer only $35,000, which is equal to what they plan to offer bachelor’s hires.

Business schools with the highest MBA salaries in the USA include Stanford GSB, Harvard Business School, and Wharton—dominated the top tiers.

Source: businessbecause.com

Interland Free Game Makes the Holiday Season Fun

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Children playing computer game on laptops at a table

Be Internet Awesome Teaches Kids the Fundamentals of Internet Safety in an Interactive Way

Just in time for the Holidays, Interland aims to teach kids in a fun way how to stay safe online.

The Interland game is free and accessible to everyone and teaches important lessons like being careful about what kids share online, how to spot scams and protect their privacy and the importance of being respectful with others.

The four lands and their key learning objectives are:

 

Reality River

Don’t Fall for Fake. The river that runs through Interland flows with fact and fiction. But things are not always as they seem. To cross the rapids, use your best judgement and don’t fall for the antics of the phisher lurking in these waters. Learning objectives include:

  • Understand not everything is true online.
  • Recognize the signs of a scam.
  • Understand phishing and how to report it.

Mindful Mountain

Share with Care. The mountainous town center of Interland is a place where everyone mingles and crosses paths. But you must be very intentional about what you share and with whom…information travels at the speed of light and there’s an oversharer among the Internauts you know. Learning objectives include:

  • Be mindful of what is shared and with whom.
  • Understand consequences of sharing.
  • Understand some info is extra sensitive.

Kind Kingdom

It’s cool to be kind. Vibes of all kinds are contagious—for better orInterland game with water and a boat for worse. In the sunniest corner of town, cyberbullies are running amok, spreading negativity everywhere. Block and report bullies to stop their takeover and be kind to other Internauts to restore the peaceful nature of this land. Learning objectives include:

  • The web amplifies kindness and negativity.
  • Not tolerating bullying and speaking up.
  • Block and report mean spirited behavior.

Tower of Treasure

Secure your secrets. Mayday! The Tower is unlocked, leaving the Internaut’s valuables like personal info and passwords at high risk. Outrun the hacker and build an untouchable password every step of the way…to secure your secrets once and for all. Learning objectives include:

  • Take responsibility to protect your things.
  • How to make a strong password.
  • A good password should be memorable.

Interland is currently available in English, Spanish, and Brazilian Portuguese. To access this free game visit:

https://beinternetawesome.withgoogle.com/en_us/interland