Mexican Scientist Creates Biodegradable Plastic Straw From Cactus

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Sandra Ortiz stands in kitchen behind table filled with vaiations of her new plastic

Researchers from the University of Valle de Atemajac in Zapopan, Mexico have created a biodegradable plastic from the juice of the prickly pear cactus.

The new material begins to break down after sitting in the soil for a month and when left in water, it breaks down in a matter of days. Plus, it doesn’t require crude oil like traditional plastics.

“There were some publications that spoke of different materials with which biodegradable plastics could be made, including some plants,” Sandra Pascoe Ortiz, the research professor who developed the material, told Forbes.

“In this case the nopal cactus has certain chemical characteristics with which I thought it could be feasible to obtain a polymer, that if it was combined with some other substances, all of them natural, a non-toxic biodegradable plastic would be obtained. The process is a mixture of compounds whose base is the nopal. It’s totally non-toxic, all the materials we use could be ingested both by animals or humans and they wouldn’t cause any harm.”

This means that even if any of this material made its way into the ocean, it will safely dissolve. It’s estimated that between 1.15 million to 2.41 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean each year from rivers. Last month, divers found a plastic KFC bag from the 1970s during an ocean clean-up off the waters off Bulcock Beach in Queensland, Australia and earlier this year, during a dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench – the deepest point in the ocean – a plastic bag was found.

According to Ortiz, the project was born in a science Fair of the The nopal cactus sitting on table with blender in the backgroundDepartment of Exact Sciences and Engineering, in the chemistry class with industrial engineering students of the career. They began to make some attempts to obtain a plastic using cactus as raw material.

“From that I decided to start a research project in a formal way. Currently in the project collaborate researchers from the University of Guadalajara in conjunction with the University of Valle de Atemajac.”

Continue on to Forbes to read the complete article.

MBEs: Get Certified Today

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Young Hispanic couple, woman with laptop computer

Why certify? Businesses that are certified as minority owned are subject to different laws and regulations than other businesses and as such are very different entities from typical enterprises. Unlike a standard business license or registration, a minority-owned business enterprise certification is not required to run a minority-owned business, although certification can provide many benefits for a company—especially in regards to government contracting.

Below are some of the certification processes your company can expect to navigate when seeking minority-owned business enterprise certification. Also listed are the requirements that must be met by businesses that are seeking certification.

  • Manufacturers – Maximum number of employees must not surpass 500 or 1500, depending on the product being manufactured.
  • Wholesalers – Maximum number of employees must not surpass 100 or 500, depending on the product being provided.
  • Service providers – Annual sales receipts must not be higher than $2.5 or $21.5 million, depending on the service being provided.
  • Retailers – Annual sales receipts must not be higher than $5.0 or $21.0 million, depending on the product being provided.
  • General and Heavy Construction businesses – Annual sales receipts must not exceed $13.5 or $17 million, depending on the type of construction the company is engaged in.
  • Special Trade Construction businesses – Annual receipts must not be higher than $7 million.
  • Agricultural businesses – Annual sales receipts must not be higher than $0.5 to $9.0 million, depending on the agricultural product being produced.

Business Requirements

1) The company applying for certification must have a racial minority owner who owns at least 51 percent of the company.

2) The same owner must hold the highest position in the company.

3) The company must pay a fee based on company annual gross sales and also file an application that details basic company information, such as what year the business was founded.

4) The company’s primary business locations must be available for site visits.

Getting Bids

Build Relationships. When it comes to winning bids in the government contracting marketplace, contacts are everything. Business owners are advised to take the time to make connections, build relationships and network extensively. The contacts a business develops are often the key to furthering their success in government contracting. Proactively networking with larger companies, agencies and even competitors can lead to subcontracting opportunities while also showing agencies that you are a trustworthy and reliable business partner.

Subcontract. Building a reputation as a professional enterprise is crucial to the success of any business. Winning a government bid isn’t only about the monetary aspects involved with a contract; other factors are evaluated, too. An agency will often look at company financials, work history and reputation before selecting a winning organization. It helps to have contacts who can vouch for your company and the work that you do. By subcontracting, you build your reputation and gain valuable experience.

You never know when the contacts you develop will come in handy. Therefore, you should make each and every relationship meaningful because in the long run, these are the relationships that will further your company’s success.

Government RFPs are a great way for minority-owned business enterprises (MBE) to win spot and term contracts. Every year, the U.S. federal government spends more than $200 billion on goods and services, all of which are provided by private companies and many of which are minority-owned businesses. From federal to state, local and special districts, all levels of government have programs in place to increase their involvement with certified minority-owned business enterprises. Only companies who have gone through the MBE certification process are eligible for the money that is made available through such programs.

Source: BidNet

This Latina Entrepreneur Shares 4 Things She Kept In Mind As She Built Her New Venture And Raised $4 Million

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Latina entrepreneur Shadiah Sigala pictured smiling wearing a blue dress

Shadiah Sigala co-founded HoneyBook back in 2013 as a business management tool for creative entrepreneurs. Under her leadership, HoneyBook helped creatives navigate everything from invoicing to building community. As the company grew, and Sigala with it, she realized that everyone from the company’s employees to its users were graduating into different chapters of their own lives as well.

“Kinside was inspired by my experience as a first-time-founder and first-time-mother at my previous startup, HoneyBook,” shares Sigala, while explaining the inception of her second venture, Kinside. “As a cofounder and as one of the early parents on the team, my pregnancy left me responsible for determining many of our company policies. Soon, more babies would start springing up in our employee population, and our family leave, parental benefits and workplace culture matured to meet the need. However, when we sought out a child care benefit to enhance our efforts, we found that nothing quite fit our modern workforce. So I decided to do something about it and start Kinside out of the famed Silicon Valley accelerator, Y Combinator.”

Closing in on a year and a half, Kinside has graduated out of Y Combinator and has publicly launched with a total of $4 million in VC funding raised over 18 months. The solution it is offering is both for parents and the companies that employ them — a child care app that works for both the person just launching their career to the executive leading the company.

“I’ve learned that the desire to be the best for your children is universal, and it transcends job title, salary, race, personal beliefs, location,” explains Sigala.

Below Sigala expands on 4 key areas that played the biggest difference in starting and raising funds for her second startup.

Learn from your past experiences

“My first startup, HoneyBook, was a crash course in scaling a product and company quickly—from learning about organizational best practices to managing teams, and making executive decisions,” shares Sigala. “Today, I have the benefit of pattern recognition in a way that’s doubled our pace. We have gone from 10 beta employers to over 1,000 in fewer than 18 months.”

As Sigala noted, don’t be afraid to use prior experiences and transferable skillsets — whether from past startups or corporate settings — to help set yourself up for success in future endeavors.

The right co-founders

Sigala’s first company, HoneyBook, emphasizes how important it is for creatives to build supportive communities around themselves and how the same can be said for founders of startups.

“My secret weapon is my cofounders,” explains Sigala. “I lean on them to steer the ship, make important decisions, and think through tough challenges. It doesn’t hurt that they are both black-belts, wicked smart, and incredibly funny.”

Figure out what grounds you

An entrepreneur’s journey isn’t full of only highs, figuring out what will ground you during the lower moments is what will help you hold on and keep going. Sigala credits her experience growing up Latinx with helping inform her perspective as an entrepreneur.

Continue on to Forbea to read the complete article.

The 50 Most Powerful Latinas in Corporate America

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ALPFA women announce the Most Powerful Latinas

The Association of Latino Professionals for America (ALPFA) announced its list of the 50 Most Powerful Latinas of 2019, announced during its Women of ALPFA luncheon at its annual convention in Nashville, Tennessee.

This is the third iteration of the Most Powerful Latinas list.

ALPFA’s Most Powerful Latinas list highlights the achievements of senior Latina executives running Fortune 500 companies, departments, and large private firms, and also includes a few entrepreneurs leading global companies.

They were chosen according to ALPFA’s strict selection criteria.

The full list and rankings are available on ALPFA’s website

Powerful Latinas
Powerful Latinas
Powerful LatinasPowerful Latinas

About Women of ALPFA:Launched in 2002, the Women of ALPFA(WOA)initiative provides unique development and networking opportunities for ALPFA’s Latina members and the companies that want to reach them.WOA is dedicated to the professional success of Latina women, offering targeted programs and training through a professional development curriculum. WOA aims to provide professional Latinas with the tools to strengthen their leadership and management skills, fostering both their professional and personal growth.

About ALPFA:Founded in 1972, ALPFA (The Association of Latino Professionals forAmerica) was the first national Latino professional association in the United States. ALPFA’s purpose is connecting Latino leaders for impactand is committed to developing Latino men and women as leaders of character for the nation, in every sector of the global economy. Today, ALPFA serves over 92,000 members in 160 student chapters and 45 professional chapters across the country.

This Navy Vet Is Now Taking His Military Skills To Home Inspections

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Joseph Cruz stands in front of his home inspection vehicle

Shortly after retiring from a 21-year career in the Navy, Joseph Cruz, 41, had an honest conversation with himself about his next steps in life.

Cruz took a job with a medical gas company to gain experience in sales. He really wanted to be in business for himself so after much soul searching and due diligence he is a first-time business owner who opened his Pillar To Post Home Inspectors® franchise of Knoxville.

Driven by his longtime interest in real estate coupled with a desire to drive his own future as a business owner Cruz was ultimately drawn to Pillar To Post’s strong reputation coupled with the promising home inspection market. A recent survey from the American Society of Home Inspectors (ASHI) found that 88 percent of all U.S. homeowners believe home inspections are a necessity instead of a luxury.

As it turns out, homes operate a lot like vessels. Both require various well-oiled systems that must work together seamlessly to function optimally. Cruz plans to apply his many years of experience working on three warships (the USS O’Bannon DD-987, the USS Higgins DDG-76 and the USS Rafael Peralta DDG-115) to his new career providing quality home inspections to realtors, homebuyers and sellers.

“Like a well-built and properly-operating home, a Navy ship has various inputs of air, water, power and data that all work together,” Cruz said. “I’m looking forward to applying my helicopter-view mindset of a ship’s operations to the home inspection industry. I’ve owned several homes in the past and in the process of buying and selling, I fell in love with real estate,” Cruz said. “After the Navy, the possibility of a career in real estate was intriguing. As I researched franchise opportunities for veterans, Pillar To Post stood out at the top of the rankings for franchised companies that cater to veterans, with a 5-Star status from VetFran, the IFA’s program for veterans.”

Pillar To Post Home Inspectors® is the brand to which more than three million families have turned to for 25 years to be their trusted advisor when buying or selling a home. Consistently ranked as the top-rated home inspection company on Entrepreneur Magazine’s annual Franchise500®, the company is enjoying its 19th year in a row on that list.

All veterans know all too well that the path to achieving one’s dreams takes a mix of determination and sacrifice peppered with a bit of a sense of adventure. Opening a business takes a lot of the same grit, and Cruz has proven he has the endurance and focus to make his business a success by moving his family across the country from San Diego to Knoxville last June. The past five months has been filled with change for Cruz, who packed up his van and left California behind with only a tent, sleeping bags and a power generator in tow.

“We camped along the way, staying at various National Parks until we finally arrived in Knoxville in July,” Cruz said. “I very much look forward to becoming an integral part of my business community.”

About Pillar To Post Home Inspectors®
Founded in 1994, Pillar To Post Home Inspectors is the largest home inspection company in North America with home offices in Toronto and Tampa. There are nearly 600 franchises located in 49 states and nine Canadian provinces. The company has been named as Best in Category in Entrepreneur Magazine’s Franchise500® ranking for 19 years in a row. Long-term plans include adding 500 to 600 new franchisees over the next five years. For further information, please visit www.pillartopost.com. To inquire about a franchise go to pillartopostfranchise.com.

TIAA Celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month with a Focus on Career Growth in the Hispanic/Latino Community

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Dr. Robert Rodriguez {in middle} with TIAA employees in Chicago

In honor of National Hispanic Heritage Month, TIAA hosted several events in September and October that educated and entertained employees about the Latino culture and community.

Hispanic Heritage Month starts September 15, which marks the independence of many Latin American countries, and ends on October 15. This month celebrates the histories, cultures and contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans. TIAA’s Business Resource Group (BRG) for Latino and Hispanic professionals, called Unite, planned Hispanic Heritage Month events with a focus on career and economic growth of the Latino community.

On September 26, the Unite BRG welcomed a company-wide conversation with Dr. Robert Rodriguez (pictured: Dr. Robert Rodriguez {in middle} with TIAA employees in Chicago) live in Chicago and via video conference to office locations nationwide. Dr. Rodriguez is the founder and president of Dr. Robert Rodriguez Advisors LLC (DRR Advisors), a diversity consulting firm that helps business leaders elevate the impact and effectiveness of workplace inclusion initiatives.

Nationally-acclaimed speaker Dr. Rodriguez discussed the current state of Latino leadership in corporate America, including case studies of corporations and how they effectively recruit, hire and retain Latino/Hispanic talent and use that talent as an asset for their businesses. He also shared why companies view the U.S. Latino community as a catalyst for economic growth and the next great source of intellectual capital.

Dr. Rodriguez stressed the importance of people bringing their true selves to work, including their true heritage. This will become more prevalent as the workforce of the future will be heavily Hispanic/Latino – the fastest growing population in the U.S. – surpassing other ethnicities and soon to reach 25 percent, he explained.

Despite the growth of the Latino population, there is still a disparity of Latinos in leadership positions and on boards in corporate America. Dr. Rodriguez encourages organizations and employees to create workplace conditions that allow people to feel comfortable and safe to bring their true selves to work, and to not tell people to leave their culture at home.

Additional activities were held throughout the months of September and October in multiple TIAA offices to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, including talent development sessions, salsa dance lessons and other cultural dance performances, plus volunteer events at nonprofits NC MedAssist in Charlotte and Junior Achievement in Dallas – all held by the Unite BRG local chapters in Charlotte, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Jacksonville and New York.

On October 2, TIAA’s Unite BRG held a Personal Branding Best Practices session open to all employees to learn how the “Performance, Image and Exposure (P.I.E.)” model can help them balance and positively impact their career and success.

These events highlight the contributions of the Latino and Hispanic culture, and showcase the wonderful work of TIAA volunteers and colleagues as part of the Unite BRG. TIAA invites all of its employees to attend these informative and engaging national and local events that celebrate TIAA’s diverse and inclusive culture and the heritage month.

Started in 1968, Hispanic Heritage Month commences each year on September 15, the anniversary of the independence of five Latin American countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua.

Source: TIAA

In Helping His Dad With Diabetes, Young Mexican Chemist Pioneers Healthy—and Cheap—Sugar Substitute

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Javier Larragoiti and team working in the Xilinat lab

When 18-year old Javier Larragoiti was told his father had been diagnosed with diabetes, the young man, who had just started studying chemical engineering at college in Mexico City, decided to dedicate his studies to finding a safe, sugar-alternative for his father.

“My dad tried to use stevia and sucralose, just hated the taste, and kept cheating on his diet,” Larragoiti told The Guardian. Stevia and sucralose are both popular sugar alternatives, and many reduced-sugar products available today contain one or the other.

With stevia and sucralose out of the picture, the young chemist needed to keep searching. He started dabbling with xylitol, a sweet-tasting alcohol found in birch wood but also in many fruits and vegetables. Xylitol is used in sugar-free products such as chewing gum and also in children’s medicine, but is toxic to dogs even in small amounts.

“It has so many good properties for human health, and the same flavor as sugar, but the problem was that producing it was so expensive,” said Larragoiti. “So I decided to start working on a cheaper process to make it accessible to everyone.”

Xylitol Made Cheaper

Corn is Mexico’s largest agricultural crop, and Javier has now patented a method of extracting xylitol from discarded corn cobs. Best of all, with 28 million metric tons of corn cobs generated every year in Mexico as waste, there’s no shortage of xylitol-generating fuel.

Simultaneously, Larragoiti hit on the idea of how to make xylitol less expensive, while inventing a way to reuse the 28 million tons of corn cobs, substantially upgrading the traditional means of disposal: burning them.

Especially in a pollution-heavy country like Mexico, reducing the amount of corn waste burned, would eliminate a portion of the carbon emissions.

His business, Xilinat, buys waste from 13 local farmers, producing 1 ton of the product each year. His invention was awarded a prestigious $310,000 Chivas Venture prize award, which will enable him to industrialize his operation and scale up production 10-fold, diverting another 10 tons of corn cob from the furnace.

Continue on to the Good News Network to read the complete article.

Over 6,000 Minority Business Enterprises and Corporate Partners Attend National Conference on Supplier Diversity in Atlanta

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minority business owners shaking hands at conference

On Sunday, October 13, the National Minority Supplier Development Council (NMSDC) kicked off its annual conference and business opportunity exchange in Atlanta.

With over 12,000 certified minority-owned businesses representing millions of consumers, NMSDC is the largest and most successful non-profit advocating for minority entrepreneurs in the country.

The conference draws over 6,000 minority-business owners and corporate partners from around the nation.

“Economic inclusion is one of the most urgent issues we face to ensure opportunity and prosperity for all Americans,” said Adrienne Trimble, President of NMSDC. “Our numbers prove our success in this area.

In 2018, we executed $400 billion in revenue for minority-owned businesses. Some 1.6 million U.S. jobs were created, resulting in $96 billion in wages earned.

Who: National Minority Supplier Development Council

NMSDC President: Adrienne C. Trimble

What: 2019 Conference and Business Opportunity Exchange

Where: Atlanta, GA Georgia World Congress Center

When: October 13 – 16, 2019

Click here for the full conference schedule

Why: Economic inclusion for all Americans is one of the most critical issues of our time.

About NMSDCNMSDC advances business opportunities for certified minority business enterprises and connects them to corporate members. To meet the growing need for supplier diversity, NMSDC matches its more than 12,000 certified minority-owned businesses to our network of more than 1,450 corporate members who wish to purchase their products, services and solutions. NMSDC, a unique and specialized player in the field of minority business enterprise, is proud of its unwavering commitment to advance Asian, Black, Hispanic and Native American suppliers in a globalized corporate supply chain.

2019 Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers National Convention

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SHPE Logo

Join the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) for their 2019 National Convention in Phoenix, Arizona from October 30 – November 3. Attend the largest gathering of Hispanics in STEM!

This annual event brings together the largest number of Hispanic STEM professionals in the U.S. The theme for this year’s convention is “The Power of Transformation,” celebrating the evolution of SHPE, the empowerment of its members, and the elevation of Hispanics in STEM.

Enjoy a career fair with 275+ top companies & graduate schools, professional networking opportunities, educational sessions with leading experts and world class speakers from Fortune 500 companies.

SHPE changes lives by empowering the Hispanic community to realize its fullest potential and to impact the world through STEM awareness, access, support and development.

There are multiple conferences available from which to choose, so pick the sessions that are right for you! Pre-College, Academic, Professionals, SHPEtinas, Technology & Innovation.

Curious to see more about what goes on at the largest gathering of Hispanics in STEM? Check out the highlight reel from our 2018 convention in Cleveland, OH.

A special thank you to Visionary Sponsor – Honeywell!

For more information please visit SHPE2019.ORG and be sure to follow the hashtag #SHPE2019 on social media for the latest convention news!

Why This Successful Entrepreneur Pays It Forward by Helping Other Latinas Succeed

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Ana Bermudez stands with one hand on her hip with the other holding her smartphone with the image of her app TAGit

Ana Bermudez may not have been set up to be a success story from the beginning, but today, she is. Her tenacity and dedication to fulfilling her American dream helped her overcome numerous obstacles throughout her life.

By Christine Bolaños

Today, the San Diego native is a successful technology entrepreneur and advocate for the advancement of women of color in business.

Ana grew up in Logan Heights, an immigrant community in central San Diego where gangs, shootings, teenage pregnancy, and violence were normal parts of life. Her single Mexican mother took on various jobs to make ends meet while raising Ana and her three younger siblings.

Her family eventually ended up moving back into her grandparents’ crowded home where her uncles were up at late hours drinking with their gang buddies. “They did shield me from that,” Ana told POPSUGAR. But her younger sister fell into the same vicious cycle and became pregnant at 14 and again shortly thereafter. Ana and her mom coparent her niece and nephew.

As a child, Ana sought refuge in the many books her family gifted her. She was an avid reader, but it wasn’t until her mother gave her an encyclopedia series that her life changed. “It was an entire 30-piece volume of books and I was in absolute love,” Ana said. “That’s when I think I really stepped up my appreciation for education. Suddenly, I could learn and read about everything I wanted.”

Her Uncle Louie eventually took her under his wing. He works at Barrio Station, a nonprofit that seeks to save young lives and empower families by revitalizing neighborhoods and offering community activities. He took Ana to events and programs and treated her and her sister to trips to local museums and baseball games. “There was some balance to my life because I was also exposed to rehabilitation through my uncle,” Ana said. “That even though you were born into circumstances, you didn’t necessarily have to get stuck to that.”

Looking back, Ana said she realizes her mother may have been her greatest role model. Her mom had aspirations of her own that were cut short when she had children. But she worked hard to provide for her family. From becoming a manager at a local McDonald’s, to earning her cosmetology license, working as a cashier at a local taco shack, and eventually becoming an associate vice president insurance broker at a local insurance company. She would sometimes take Ana to work, where she had the opportunity to file paperwork, write receipts, and learn the basics of business and finance. “That woman has been through quite a lot and she’s always been very, very passionate about her work, which is where I assume my passion for numbers and business came about,” Ana said.

Ana went to the University of Notre Dame after receiving a scholarship. After college, Merrill Lynch hired her for a staff position. She worked there for five years as a wealth management adviser before transitioning to the role of chief financial officer at a small company.

Ready for the next challenge, Ana founded TAGit, a mobile app that television viewers use to buy items from their favorite TV shows. Through her research, she found that 40 million women shopped online while watching television. It seemed like a viable business, and after putting her brother through college and buying her mother a home in a safer neighborhood, Ana was ready to take a financial risk. She left her corporate job and followed her entrepreneurial desire.

However, a year-and-a-half later, she hadn’t found a big investor and was starting to doubt she had what it took to make it as an entrepreneur. With the odds stacked against her — just over 2 percent of venture capital funding went to women-led businesses in 2018 — two of her male mentors advised her to seek support from networks and organizations geared toward women and Latinx. She accompanied a friend to the Women’s Venture Summit at the last minute in 2013, a one-day intensive event that equips and connects female founders with female funders, and it was there where she met the event’s cohost, Latina scientist-turned-investor Dr. Silvia Mah.

Her mantra of “patience, persistence, and preparation” paid off as Ana found multiple investors at the Women’s Venture Summit, including Dr. Mah, who became an important figure in Ana’s life. “I laid out all my cards. I told her I’ve been doing this a long time and haven’t been able to get funding. She became my mentor,” Ana said.

Ana went on to serve as a panelist at future summit events and eventually became a program director at Stella Angels, an all-woman angel group founded by Dr. Mah, that seeks to grow the number of angel investors and fund more female entrepreneurs globally.

Now that she runs a successful business, Ana pays it forward by helping other women and people of color gain access to funding and become investors for other businesses.

Continue on to POPSUGAR to read the complete article.

USHCC Names Spanish Broadcasting System Chairman, President & CEO Raúl Alarcón “2019 Businessperson of the Year”

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President & CEO Raúl Alarcón accepts award on stage for “2019 Businessperson of the Year”

Raúl Alarcón, Chairman and CEO of Spanish Broadcasting System (“SBS”) (OCTQX: SBSAA) received the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce’s (USHCC) 2019 Hispanic Businessperson of the Year Award.

Hundreds of Hispanic business, corporate and community leaders from across the U.S. attended the awards’ gala event, which took place at the USHCC’s 40th Anniversary National Convention in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The award was presented by international top-selling artist Prince Royce who dedicated emotional words to the media mogul.

Every year, the USHCC recognizes an entrepreneur who exemplifies the best of America’s business community through their outstanding leadership, pioneering spirit and social and economic contributions.

The USHCC National Convention is the largest networking venue for Hispanic businesses in America. For over a generation, the USHCC has served as the nation’s leading Hispanic Business organization and worked to bring more than 4.37 million Hispanic owned businesses to the forefront of the national economic agenda. The National Convention brings together Hispanic business owners, corporate executives and members of more than 200 local Hispanic chambers of commerce from across the country. It offers the opportunity to establish strategic long-lasting business partnerships, through dialogue, networking, workshops, and more.

Raúl Alarcón has become a key player for Latinos in Hispanic Radio and across digital media.. The charismatic CEO and Chairman of SBS oversees 17 Spanish-Language radio stations in the top Latin markets in the US and has extended that leadership into digital through its LaMusica app, currently the #1 ranked Hispanic streaming site and top Hispanic radio app.

The award highlights Mr. Alarcón’s strategic vision of integrating radio, television, entertainment and online/digital properties to capture growth opportunities with a clear eye on engaging the U.S. Hispanic consumer.
“Raúl Alarcón is a steadfast businessmen whose company continues to reach new heights and he inspires business leaders everywhere, especially in the media field,” said Ramiro Cavazos, the President and Chief Executive Officer of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “We are proud to recognize him as the 2019 Businessperson of the Year on our 40th Anniversary USHCC National Convention.”

“I am incredibly honored to receive this award from the USHCC – an organization that does so much to support Hispanic entrepreneurs across our country,” said Raúl Alarcón Chairman, President & CEO of SBS. “As an immigrant from Cuba, this is proof that the U.S. is truly the land of opportunity, where we can live the American Dream through hard work, a clear vision and the support of amazing organizations like the USHCC.” Raúl Alarcón Jr., joined SBS in 1983 as an Account Executive and has been President and Director since October 1985 and Chief Executive Officer since June 1994. On November 2, 1999, Mr. Alarcón, became Chairman of the Board of Directors and continues as Chief Executive Officer and President. Currently, Mr. Alarcón is responsible for SBS’ long-range strategic planning and operational matters and is instrumental in the acquisition and related financing of each SBS station.
Raúl Alarcón represents examples of the tremendous world-class talent that has emerged from the Hispanic community to serve in top leadership roles across all parts of America.

About LaMusica
LaMusica is a music-centric online platform catering to a wide variety of Hispanic users through the live audio and video streaming of the nation’s top-rated radio stations owned by Spanish Broadcasting System (SBS), including WSKQ-FM in New York City, the #1 Hispanic station in America, as well as other leading SBS formats from around the country. Offering a daily variety of exclusive digital content including current events video vignettes, celebrity interviews, podcasts, expertly curated playlists and world premiere music videos, LaMusica is the preferred Hispanic streaming platform for today’s U.S. Latinos. LaMusica is available via the mobile app, the LaMusica.com website, iOS and Android smartphones and tablets, Apple TV, Roku, Android TV, Firestick/AmazonTV, Samsung SmartTV, Apple CarPlay, as well as Chromecast and Alexa-enabled devices.

About Spanish Broadcasting System, Inc.
Spanish Broadcasting System, Inc. (SBS) owns and operates radio stations located in the top U.S. Hispanic markets of New York, Los Angeles, Miami, Chicago, San Francisco and Puerto Rico, airing the Tropical, Regional Mexican, Spanish Adult Contemporary, Top 40 and Urbano format genres. SBS also operates AIRE Radio Networks, a national radio platform of over 250 affiliated stations reaching 94% of the U.S. Hispanic audience. SBS also owns MegaTV, a network television operation with over-the-air, cable and satellite distribution and affiliates throughout the U.S. and Puerto Rico, produces and promotes a nationwide series of live concerts and events, and owns a stable of digital properties, including La Musica, a mobile app providing Latino-focused audio and video streaming content and HitzMaker, a new-talent destination for aspiring artists and music aficionados. For more information, visit us online at spanishbroadcasting.com.