Google announces literary activities to help kids evaluate and analyze media as they browse the Internet

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Google is pleased to announce the addition of 6 new media literacy activities to the 2019 edition of Be Internet Awesome. Designed to help kids analyze and evaluate media as they navigate the Internet, the new lessons address educators’ growing interest in teaching media literacy.

They were developed in collaboration with Anne Collier, executive director of The Net Safety Collaborative, and Faith Rogow, PhD, co-author of The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy and a co-founder of the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Because media literacy is essential to safety and citizenship in the digital age, the news lessons complement Be Internet Awesome ’s digital safety and citizenship topics.

Overview of new activities:
1. Share with Care: That’s not what I meant!
● Overview: Students will learn the importance of asking the question: “How might others interpret what I share?” They’ll learn to read visual cues people use to communicate information about themselves and to draw conclusions about others.

2. Share with Care: Frame it
● Overview: Students will learn to see themselves as media creators. They’ll understand that media makers make choices about what to show and what to keep outside the frame. They’ll apply the concept of framing to understand the difference between what to make visible and public online and what to keep “invisible.”

3. Don’t Fall for Fake: Is that really true?
● Overview: Students will learn how to apply critical thinking to discern between what’s credible and non-credible in the many kinds of media they run into online.

4. Don’t Fall for Fake: Spotting disinformation online
● Overview: Students will learn how to look for and analyze clues to what is and isn’t reliable information online.

5. It’s Cool to Be Kind: How words can change a picture
● Overview: Students will learn to make meaning from the combination of pictures and words and will understand how a caption can change what we think a picture is communicating. They will gain an appreciation for the power of their own words, especially when combined with pictures they post.

6. When in Doubt, Talk It Out: What does it mean to be brave?
● Overview: Students will think about what it means to be brave online and IRL, where they got their ideas about “brave” and how media affect their thinking about it.

Expanding resources to families
YMCA
We teamed up with the YMCA across six cities to host bilingual workshops for parents to help teach families about online safety and digital citizenship with Be Internet Awesome and help families create healthy digital habits with the Family Link app. The workshops, designed for parents, coincide with June’s National Internet Safety Month and come at the start of the school summer holidays.

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Meet Dulce Candy: A Beauty Influencer Empowering Women

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Dulce Candy headshot

By Samar Khoury

Dulce Candy, one of the top lifestyle & beauty content creators online, is an inspiration to women who aspire to be entrepreneurs. Dulce, a successful businesswoman, published author, and Iraq War Veteran, spoke with HISPANIC Network Magazine about her journey.

HISPANIC Network Magazine (HNM): Tell us about your background. How did serving in the U.S. Army influence your decision to become a Beauty Influencer?

Dulce Candy (DC): I was born in Mexico, Michoacan. I immigrated to the U.S. in 1994 at age 6 with my Mom and two sisters at the time. I was raised in Oxnard, California. After graduating from high school, I chose to enlist active duty in the U.S. Army because I was looking for an opportunity to start a new life and make my parents proud.

HNM: What inspired you to start your own YouTube channel? Who is your beauty inspiration?

DC: For 15 months of my deployment in Baghdad, Iraq, I was forbidden to wear any civilian clothing or makeup, rightfully so. Because of the lack of self-expression, a burning desire to express my individuality was born. I never knew how much fashion and beauty meant to me until it was taken away completely. When I arrived back in the states in 2009 after my deployment, I discovered the tiny “Beauty” community online!

At that time, there were only about 100 beauty channels with only about 20 getting all the shine, and with members of the Latinx community leading less than 10 beauty channels. Starting my YouTube channel has been one of the most important choices I’ve ever made in my life. It allowed my passion for my hobby of beauty to flourish and turn into a thriving career that is still going strong 11 years later.

My beauty inspiration at the moment is more of a “look” than a person. I am all about the dewy and real skin glam. The type of look that enhances one’s natural beauty that radiates from within. This includes soft, bushy eyebrows, glowing skin, shimmery eyes, and glossy lips.

HNM: What have you accomplished through your YouTube channel? How has your channel inspired others?

DC: I am blessed beyond my wildest dreams! One of my most significant accomplishments was publishing my first self-help book titled The Sweet Life, moderating a town hall with Hillary Clinton, and starring in a Target commercial. My hope with my channel is to inspire other young women not to let their past or where they come from define them. I also hope to encourage young women not to be afraid of using their powerful voice to convey what they want. To also live life unapologetically and on their own terms.

HNM: How many social media campaigns have you been a part of?
DC: I have been so fortunate to partner with so many of my favorite brands over the past 11 years since I started my channel!

HNM: Tell us about the brands you’ve worked with. 

DC: I am blessed to have worked with numerous brands throughout the years! Some of my favorites include my face and lip palettes collaboration with Pixi Beauty, which was sold in Target stores. Also, over the years, I have had the opportunity to travel the world with different brands, and really loved trips to Costa Rica and London with different brand partners. In 2018, I also worked with an organization called Global Glow to empower young girls in numerous communities to advocate for themselves, use their voice to create their own opportunities and affect change in their communities. I enjoyed the partnership because I was able to use my platform to shed light on an organization whose mission aligned with my personal values and beliefs!

HNM: What else do you hope to accomplish, and what other changes would you like to see?

DC: I hope we continue to celebrate diversity so that young people can see themselves represented in an authentic way that makes them feel like they matter and that they too are beautiful in their own unique way.

HNM: What’s next on your agenda?

DC: My husband and I made the decision to expand our family and go through with IVF, and I recently found out that I am pregnant! I am very excited to go through the pregnancy journey! I also want to remain focused on self-growth, family, and continue to share my journey and experiences with my audience to inspire others!

For more information on this inspirational beauty mogul, visit Dulce’s website: dulcecandy.com

Follow Dulce Candy on Twitter, Instagram @dulcecandy and YouTube at Dulce Candy.

Lannan Foundation Creates $3 Million Endowment for Native American Scholarships with the American Indian College Fund

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College students pictured walking to classes outside a University campus

Only 14% of American Indian and Alaska Native students have a college degree, less than half the rate of other groups—and one barrier to getting a higher education is often cost.

Lannan Foundation of Santa Fe, New Mexico is helping to make it easier for Native students to get a college degree, thanks to a $3 million endowment it created with the American Indian College Fund. The endowment will provide Native American students with scholarships to attend tribal colleges and universities.

The College Fund supports 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) through capital and programmatic support and scholarships. These remarkable institutions are located on or near Indian reservations, serving people who live in remote, rural communities. TCUs are affordable, accredited higher education institutions and offer culturally based curriculum in a supportive environment, with 74% of TCU graduates going on to work in careers that serve their communities, according to the results of the Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey by the College Fund and Gallup.

Patrick Lannan, President, said, “Tribal colleges and universities, in many respects, are the center of hope for Indian country and Indian people in the United States. The American Indian College Fund makes a good future for tribal college students much more viable.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “It has been my personal pleasure to know Patrick Lannan and Lannan Foundation for many years, witnessing their path as an organization committed to social justice and the voices of disenfranchised people. This gift to our students’ successful college experiences through a scholarship endowment is but another example of that commitment. We thank them for their vision and their generosity.”

About Lannan Foundation—Lannan Foundation is a family foundation dedicated to cultural freedom, diversity and creativity through projects that support exceptional contemporary artists and writers, as well as inspired Native activists in rural indigenous communities. The foundation recognizes the profound and often unquantifiable value of the creative process and is willing to take risks and make substantial investments in ambitious and experimental thinking. Understanding that globalization threatens all cultures and ecosystems, the foundation is particularly interested in projects that encourage freedom of inquiry, imagination, and expression. The foundation supports this mission by making grants to nonprofit organizations in the areas of contemporary visual artliteratureindigenous communities, and cultural freedom. For more information visit lannan.org.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

MBA Salaries in the U.S. Highest on Record

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Recent graduates with an advanced business degree, particularly in the United States, are procuring substantial starting salaries. The median annual base starting salary U.S. employers plan to offer new MBA hires is $115,000—more than double the median for new bachelor’s degree hires ($55,000) and the highest ever recorded in the United States.

By industry among U.S. employers, median MBA starting salaries are highest in the consulting ($135,000) and finance/accounting ($125,000) industries.

“Employers clearly place a high value on acquiring MBA and business master’s graduates,” said Sangeet Chowfla, president and CEO of GMAC. “We are seeing a highly active candidate marketplace in terms of geographical shifts in study destinations, but the value that both employers and graduates see in an advanced business degree is a constant.”

Overall, most employers have increased MBA starting salaries (56 percent), including 63 percent of Asia-Pacific employers, 56 percent of U.S. employers, and 49 percent of European employers. Median annual base starting salaries vary considerably by world region. European companies plan to offer new MBA hires $95,000, and the median for Asia-Pacific companies is $45,000.

Source: globenewswire.com

Labels Don’t Define Who You Are

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group of professional Latinx employees

By Mona Lisa Faris

While it’s not a new word, we’re hearing “Latinx” more and more. Politicians are using the word more frequently—in fact, during the first Democratic debate this year, Senator Elizabeth Warren used it in her opening remarks.

Since its conception, “Latinx” is now a “hot” label. What does “Latinx” mean, and why is there so much controversy surrounding it? Basically, “Latinx” is a gender-neutral term used in lieu of “Latino” or “Latina” to refer to a person of Latin-American descent. Using the term “Latinx” to refer to all people of Latin-American descent has become more common as members in the LGBTQ+ community and its advocates have embraced the label.

The word was created as a gender-neutral alternative to “Latinos,” not only to better include those who are gender fluid but also to push back on the inherently masculine term used to describe all genders in the Spanish language.

I have to agree with George Cadava, director of the Latina and Latino Studies program at Northwestern University, when he said, “Latinx is an even further evolution that was meant to be inclusive of people who are queer or lesbian or gay or transgender.”

The U.S. Census Bureau still uses “Hispanic” and defines it as the “heritage, nationality, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before arriving in the United States.” For the past 30 years, we here call ourselves HISPANIC Network Magazine to encompass Latin, Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Chicano, and any Spanish-speaking country.

As we’re sensitive to all the different cultures and labels, we have something for everyone. We are proud to bring you the powerful, beautiful and talented Puerto Rican Afro-Latina—La La Anthony. Read our interview with this superstar and how she uses philanthropy to power her causes.

Don’t let the labels stop you from voting, reading this magazine or being who you who you are. Until the next word comes, remember, labels don’t define who you are.

4 Podcasts for Your Daily Commute

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Get the scoop on jobs, lifestyle, and more! Podcasts have taken the world by storm.

Instead of listening to music on the way to and from work, most people are listening to their favorite podcasts.

Many cover topics like true crime, comedy, sports and recreation, society and culture, and arts and business.

“Podcast” was formed by combining “iPod” and “broadcast”.

Many different mobile applications allow people to subscribe and to listen to podcasts.

Check out these podcasts that give you business advice and teach you about food, family, history, and more.
 

Mucho Success

Mucho Success: Advice and Success Secrets for Latinos

How can Latinos become more successful? Learn the secrets of the most influential people and apply them to your life. Join corporate executive, entrepreneur, and business coach José Piñero as he interviews fascinating leaders and brings inspiring stories, lessons, and advice to empower and elevate Latinos.

Source: The Cultivation Company

Wait, Hold Up

Wait, Hold Up!

This podcast is for everyone trying to live their best lives but need some support, encouragement, and most importantly, dope girlfriends. Jess and Yarel are there to hash out their own real-life moments as well as get into those ‘wait, hold up!’ moments with their guests! Each episode offers something new, whether they’re diving into topics like careers, spirituality, personal development, or wellness.

Source: Wait, Hold Up! Podcast

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch provides a digital media platform that reflects the intersectionality between queer, Latinx, and Spanglish voices in an Anglo-dominated podcast world. FavyFav and Babelito approach the topics of identity, food, family, and history in a responsible yet humorous way.

Source: Latinos Who Lunch

Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina is an interview podcast hosted by Alicia Menendez and executive produced by Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. Menendez said, “Less than a year ago, when we first launched Latina to Latina, we produced what the two of us wanted and needed: a space for Latinas to talk about their lives and professional journeys. What we’ve learned from our listeners is that they wanted and needed this more than we even imagined. Yes, they are looking for inspiration, but we routinely hear that the sense of belonging and community is what keeps them listening week after week.”

Source: Latina to Latina

Selena Gomez Surprises Students at Her Texas Middle School: ‘Know That Anything’s Possible

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Selena Gomez hugs a surprised in classroomstudent at her old middle school

Selena Gomez went back to her roots and surprised students at her old middle school in Texas.

On Monday, the award-winning artist went back to where it all began at Danny Jones Middle School in Mansfield, Texas, stopping by her old stomping grounds to encourage current students and reconnect with some of her past teachers.

“Hello, students at Danny Jones Middle School. This is Selena Gomez talking to you,” the 27-year-old said over the intercom, in a video shared by the school on the Mansfield Independent School District’s website.

According to the school, Gomez had returned to her hometown to film for a new documentary about her childhood.

“This trip, I wanted to take my best friend Courtney, and also some of my people from my label, just to show them where I grew up and how proud I am of where I’m from,” Gomez explained. “Some of my teachers I got to see again, and they were part of my life for so long.”

While the former Disney Channel star greeted students in a montage of videos — taking selfies and granting hugs —  her seventh-grade basketball coach recalled the type of student the singer was when she walked the halls.

“As a student, Selena was so humble and she was very kind,” Gray said. “She had a really kind, soft spirit. Hard, hard worker. Real humble. Just a real neat kid.”

Gray also described the day Gomez told her she was withdrawing from school to move to Florida and pursue her acting career. “I remember the day that she was leaving Jones,” Gray recalled. “She said ‘Oh I’m just going to Florida.’”

“And I said ‘How come?’ She said, ‘Oh I’m just going to be in a little Disney film.’” Gray added. “I said, ‘Oh. OK.’ Because sometimes middle school kids kind of exaggerate.”

Continue on to People to read the complete article.

40th College Television Awards Submission Period Begins Sept. 5

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College Television Awards logo

The Television Academy Foundation Awards Ceremony Celebrates Student-Produced Programs From Colleges Nationwide. The submission period for the Television Academy Foundation’s 40th College Television Awards is Sept. 5 through Oct. 3, 2019.

Each year hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, representing colleges and universities nationwide, submit their media projects to television’s most prestigious student competition—the Television Academy Foundation’s College Television Awards.

The College Television Awards honors achievement in student-produced programs and will feature stars from today’s top television shows presenting awards to winners at the red-carpet awards ceremony.

Emulating the Emmy® Awards selection process, entries for the College Television Awards are judged by Television Academy members. Top honors and a $3,000 cash prize will be presented to winning teams in eight categories: drama, comedy, animation, nonfiction, promotional, news, sports and variety. The College Television Awards also includes two additional, donor-supported, categories: the Seymour Bricker Humanitarian Award and the Loreen Arbus Focus on Disability Scholarship.

In addition to the awards ceremony, the nominees will take part in a three-day television summit hosted by the Television Academy Foundation. The summit, designed to enhance professional development, will feature panel discussions, studio tours and networking opportunities with industry executives and Academy members.

The College Television Awards often serves as an entry point for a career in television for nominees and winners. Past alumni have worked as editors, writers, producers and other positions on programs including Ray Donovan, The Handmaid’s Tale, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan, CBS This Morning, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Grey’s Anatomy, 60 Minutes, Empire and many more.

For additional information, visit TelevisionAcademy.com/CTA.

To read the complete article continue on to The Patch.

Recognizing Hispanic Heritage

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Hispanic Heritage Month

From September 15 to October 15 in the United States, people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the group’s heritage and culture.

Monday, September 16 is Mexican Independence Day. Early on the morning of September 16, 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla summoned the largely Indian and mestizo congregation of his small Dolores parish church and urged them to take up arms and fight for Mexico’s independence from Spain.

His El Grito de Dolores, or Cry of Dolores, which was spoken—not written—is commemorated on September 16 as Mexican Independence Day.

Hispanics constitute 17.6% of the nation’s total population.

By 2060, the Hispanic population is projected to increase to 119 million.

As we celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, we recognize some of the contributions to trending Hispanic lifestyle, business and entertainment.

 

Eva Longoria Presents Eva’s Kitchen
Actress, New York Times bestselling cookbook author, and Texas-native Eva Longoria continued her partnership with FoodStory Brands, a family-owned Arizona-based company, to bring her recipes to life. Longoria collaborated with FoodStory Brands’ Fresh Cravings to create an authentic, fresh-tasting, Texas-inspired salsa, Eva’s Kitchen Cantina Style Salsa. Source: Fresh Cravings
Selena Gomez Tackles Swimwear
Selena Gomez is taking on a new title: swimwear designer. Gomez, already a notable fashion designer with her Coach line, teamed up with former assistant Theresa Marie Mingus and swimwear line Krahs. Gomez created the “Selena” suit, a high-waisted bottoms and bra-style top that was partially inspired by her kidney transplant scar. She also contributed a one-piece zip-up suit. Source: teenvogue.com
Gaby Natale Makes History With 4th Consecutive Daytime EMMY Nomination
Triple Daytime EMMY® winner Gaby Natale made history last spring when the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences nominated the SuperLatina host to a fourth consecutive Daytime EMMY® Award in the Outstanding Daytime Talent in a Spanish Language Program category. Source: AGANAR Media
Emilio and Gloria Estefan Receive 2019 Gershwin Prize
Husband-and-wife team Emilio and Gloria Estefan were the recipients of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. The honorees represent two firsts for the prize – they are the first married couple and first recipients of Hispanic descent to receive the award. Source: blogs.loc.gov
Hispanic Audiences Drove ‘La Llorona’ To $26.5M.

The Curse of La Llorona beat the $15M–$17M domestic tracking with a $26.5M weekend win largely built on Hispanic audiences turning up at 49 percent. With a release in 71 territories, making it the No. 1 pic abroad and in Latin America, Llorona’s global purse stands at $56.5M. hispanicprblog.com

Dora the Explorer Now Live Action!
The live action version of animated series Dora the Explorer—Dora and The Lost City of Gold—debuted in August. The film stars Eva Longoria, Michael Peña, and Isabela Moner. Source: deadline.com

Affordable, Culturally Relevant Tribally Chartered Institutions Help Native American Students Launch Careers

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American Indian College Fund

Education has been heralded as the “great equalizer,” but today only 14% of Native Americans in the United States ages 25 and older have a bachelor’s degree or higher—less than half of that of other groups.

The key to eliminating this disparity may be tribal colleges and universities (TCUs)— affordable, accredited, culturally relevant higher education institutions chartered by tribes serving Native students on or near Indian reservations. American Indian college graduates who attended TCUs enjoy significant benefits over college students attending other academic institutions, according to a new American Indian College Fund and Gallup survey report titled Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities.

The report shows TCU graduates are creating a unique and community-focused life after graduation, outpacing the efforts of graduates from mainstream academic institutions, as well as possible reasons for that, in the following ways:

TCU graduates are giving back to their communities. Seventy-four percent of TCU graduates surveyed say they have forged careers serving their communities and societies. More than half report a deep interest in the work they do in careers that serve their communities such as education, healthcare, social services, and more. Perhaps because of the ability to do work that they find meaningful, more than half of TCU graduates report they are deeply interested in the work they do (53%) and half (50%) say they have the opportunity to do work that interests them, compared to 38% and 37% of college graduates nationally.

TCU graduates received greater support in college. TCU graduates (43%) are more than twice as likely as American Indian/Alaska Native graduates of non-TCUs (21%) and college graduates nationally (18%) to recall experiencing three critical support measures in college: having a professor who cared about them as a person, having a professor who made them excited about learning, and having a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their goals and dreams. TCU graduates outpace non-TCU American Indian/Alaska Native graduates in all three measures, with the gap between TCU and non-TCU graduates the widest for having professors who cared about them as people (59% vs. 33%, respectively).

TCU graduates are more likely to be debt-free. TCU graduates are more likely to state their education was worth the cost—67% as opposed to 39% of college graduates nationally. Only 3% of TCU graduates took student loans as compared to 19% of students nationally, leaving them debt free as they pursue their preferred careers after graduation. Lack of debt also has a positive impact on college graduates’ financial well-being and that of their families.

TCU graduates are thriving in all aspects of well-being. TCU graduates report nearly twice as much as graduates nationwide that they are thriving financially, socially, and in their communities and careers.

Tribal colleges and universities are geographically and culturally diverse but share common goals such as integrating cultural values and connection to land into curriculum and pedagogy while emphasizing community outreach and education that is rooted in tribal identity and practice. In 2017, over 11% of American Indian students studying at a U.S. two-or four-year public or private not-for-profit postsecondary institution attended one of the 35 accredited TCUs.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “All of us who have worked with tribal colleges and universities since their founding in 1968 recognized that these place-based, culturally-rooted institutions transformed lives and communities. Through the support of Strada Education Network and a partnership with Gallup, we are able to provide the data to back this up. Our graduates tell the story of our success as tribal institutions. More support for tribal colleges and universities would expand this transformative experience to more Native and rural citizens.”

The Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey report is the result of a survey of 5,000 American Indian College Fund scholars to gather information about the value of an education rooted in Native American values. The survey was funded by a grant to the American Indian College Fund by the Strada Education Network.

To download a copy of the report, please visit https://collegefund.org/inside-the-college-fund/gallup-american-indian-college-fund-survey-report-tcu-alumni-outperform-other-college-graduates-affordable-culturally-relevant-tribally-chartered-institutions-help-students-launch-community-caree.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) National Convention is Coming to Albuquerque in September

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USHCC National Convention logo

The USHCC National Convention coming to Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 29th – October 1st, is the largest networking venue for Hispanic businesses in America.

For over a generation, the USHCC has served as the nation’s leading Hispanic Business organization, working to bring more than 4.37 million Hispanic owned businesses to the forefront of the national economic agenda.

The National Convention brings together Hispanic business owners, corporate executives and members of more than 200 local Hispanic chambers of commerce from across the country.

It offers the opportunity to establish strategic long-lasting business partnerships, through dialogue, networking, workshops, and more.

Business Matchmaking:
Matchmaking sessions are designed to provide a platform for Hispanic Business Enterprises (HBEs) to meet and engage in new business opportunities by introducing their companies and services to participating corporations. Tailored to help HBEs from across the country to meet with top corporations awarding contracts, the USHCC Business Matchmaking facilitates one-on-one meetings for Hispanic-owned businesses with procurement officials from industries ranging from energy, telecom, financial services and more.

There is no additional cost to attend the Matchmaking, a separate registration is required.

Business Matchmaking will take place on Tuesday, October 1st from 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM.

New this year is the added Supplier-Ready program component to prepare all Business Matchmaking participants with educational webinars from supplier diversity professionals and helpful tips to maximize their business matchmaking experience.

View highlights from last year’s convention below:

Continue on to ushcc.com to read more.