Google announces literary activities to help kids evaluate and analyze media as they browse the Internet

LinkedIn
Mom and daughter looking at tablet together

Google is pleased to announce the addition of 6 new media literacy activities to the 2019 edition of Be Internet Awesome. Designed to help kids analyze and evaluate media as they navigate the Internet, the new lessons address educators’ growing interest in teaching media literacy.

They were developed in collaboration with Anne Collier, executive director of The Net Safety Collaborative, and Faith Rogow, PhD, co-author of The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy and a co-founder of the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Because media literacy is essential to safety and citizenship in the digital age, the news lessons complement Be Internet Awesome ’s digital safety and citizenship topics.

Overview of new activities:
1. Share with Care: That’s not what I meant!
● Overview: Students will learn the importance of asking the question: “How might others interpret what I share?” They’ll learn to read visual cues people use to communicate information about themselves and to draw conclusions about others.

2. Share with Care: Frame it
● Overview: Students will learn to see themselves as media creators. They’ll understand that media makers make choices about what to show and what to keep outside the frame. They’ll apply the concept of framing to understand the difference between what to make visible and public online and what to keep “invisible.”

3. Don’t Fall for Fake: Is that really true?
● Overview: Students will learn how to apply critical thinking to discern between what’s credible and non-credible in the many kinds of media they run into online.

4. Don’t Fall for Fake: Spotting disinformation online
● Overview: Students will learn how to look for and analyze clues to what is and isn’t reliable information online.

5. It’s Cool to Be Kind: How words can change a picture
● Overview: Students will learn to make meaning from the combination of pictures and words and will understand how a caption can change what we think a picture is communicating. They will gain an appreciation for the power of their own words, especially when combined with pictures they post.

6. When in Doubt, Talk It Out: What does it mean to be brave?
● Overview: Students will think about what it means to be brave online and IRL, where they got their ideas about “brave” and how media affect their thinking about it.

Expanding resources to families
YMCA
We teamed up with the YMCA across six cities to host bilingual workshops for parents to help teach families about online safety and digital citizenship with Be Internet Awesome and help families create healthy digital habits with the Family Link app. The workshops, designed for parents, coincide with June’s National Internet Safety Month and come at the start of the school summer holidays.

Continue on here to read more.

Labels Don’t Define Who You Are

LinkedIn
group of professional Latinx employees

By Mona Lisa Faris

While it’s not a new word, we’re hearing “Latinx” more and more. Politicians are using the word more frequently—in fact, during the first Democratic debate this year, Senator Elizabeth Warren used it in her opening remarks.

Since its conception, “Latinx” is now a “hot” label. What does “Latinx” mean, and why is there so much controversy surrounding it? Basically, “Latinx” is a gender-neutral term used in lieu of “Latino” or “Latina” to refer to a person of Latin-American descent. Using the term “Latinx” to refer to all people of Latin-American descent has become more common as members in the LGBTQ+ community and its advocates have embraced the label.

The word was created as a gender-neutral alternative to “Latinos,” not only to better include those who are gender fluid but also to push back on the inherently masculine term used to describe all genders in the Spanish language.

I have to agree with George Cadava, director of the Latina and Latino Studies program at Northwestern University, when he said, “Latinx is an even further evolution that was meant to be inclusive of people who are queer or lesbian or gay or transgender.”

The U.S. Census Bureau still uses “Hispanic” and defines it as the “heritage, nationality, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before arriving in the United States.” For the past 30 years, we here call ourselves HISPANIC Network Magazine to encompass Latin, Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Chicano, and any Spanish-speaking country.

As we’re sensitive to all the different cultures and labels, we have something for everyone. We are proud to bring you the powerful, beautiful and talented Puerto Rican Afro-Latina—La La Anthony. Read our interview with this superstar and how she uses philanthropy to power her causes.

Don’t let the labels stop you from voting, reading this magazine or being who you who you are. Until the next word comes, remember, labels don’t define who you are.

Selena Gomez Surprises Students at Her Texas Middle School: ‘Know That Anything’s Possible

LinkedIn
Selena Gomez hugs a surprised in classroomstudent at her old middle school

Selena Gomez went back to her roots and surprised students at her old middle school in Texas.

On Monday, the award-winning artist went back to where it all began at Danny Jones Middle School in Mansfield, Texas, stopping by her old stomping grounds to encourage current students and reconnect with some of her past teachers.

“Hello, students at Danny Jones Middle School. This is Selena Gomez talking to you,” the 27-year-old said over the intercom, in a video shared by the school on the Mansfield Independent School District’s website.

According to the school, Gomez had returned to her hometown to film for a new documentary about her childhood.

“This trip, I wanted to take my best friend Courtney, and also some of my people from my label, just to show them where I grew up and how proud I am of where I’m from,” Gomez explained. “Some of my teachers I got to see again, and they were part of my life for so long.”

While the former Disney Channel star greeted students in a montage of videos — taking selfies and granting hugs —  her seventh-grade basketball coach recalled the type of student the singer was when she walked the halls.

“As a student, Selena was so humble and she was very kind,” Gray said. “She had a really kind, soft spirit. Hard, hard worker. Real humble. Just a real neat kid.”

Gray also described the day Gomez told her she was withdrawing from school to move to Florida and pursue her acting career. “I remember the day that she was leaving Jones,” Gray recalled. “She said ‘Oh I’m just going to Florida.’”

“And I said ‘How come?’ She said, ‘Oh I’m just going to be in a little Disney film.’” Gray added. “I said, ‘Oh. OK.’ Because sometimes middle school kids kind of exaggerate.”

Continue on to People to read the complete article.

4 Podcasts for Your Daily Commute

LinkedIn
young woman driving with window down and smiling

Get the scoop on jobs, lifestyle, and more! Podcasts have taken the world by storm.

Instead of listening to music on the way to and from work, most people are listening to their favorite podcasts.

Many cover topics like true crime, comedy, sports and recreation, society and culture, and arts and business.

“Podcast” was formed by combining “iPod” and “broadcast”.

Many different mobile applications allow people to subscribe and to listen to podcasts.

Check out these podcasts that give you business advice and teach you about food, family, history, and more.
 

Mucho Success

Mucho Success: Advice and Success Secrets for Latinos

How can Latinos become more successful? Learn the secrets of the most influential people and apply them to your life. Join corporate executive, entrepreneur, and business coach José Piñero as he interviews fascinating leaders and brings inspiring stories, lessons, and advice to empower and elevate Latinos.

Source: The Cultivation Company

Wait, Hold Up

Wait, Hold Up!

This podcast is for everyone trying to live their best lives but need some support, encouragement, and most importantly, dope girlfriends. Jess and Yarel are there to hash out their own real-life moments as well as get into those ‘wait, hold up!’ moments with their guests! Each episode offers something new, whether they’re diving into topics like careers, spirituality, personal development, or wellness.

Source: Wait, Hold Up! Podcast

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch provides a digital media platform that reflects the intersectionality between queer, Latinx, and Spanglish voices in an Anglo-dominated podcast world. FavyFav and Babelito approach the topics of identity, food, family, and history in a responsible yet humorous way.

Source: Latinos Who Lunch

Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina is an interview podcast hosted by Alicia Menendez and executive produced by Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. Menendez said, “Less than a year ago, when we first launched Latina to Latina, we produced what the two of us wanted and needed: a space for Latinas to talk about their lives and professional journeys. What we’ve learned from our listeners is that they wanted and needed this more than we even imagined. Yes, they are looking for inspiration, but we routinely hear that the sense of belonging and community is what keeps them listening week after week.”

Source: Latina to Latina

40th College Television Awards Submission Period Begins Sept. 5

LinkedIn
College Television Awards logo

The Television Academy Foundation Awards Ceremony Celebrates Student-Produced Programs From Colleges Nationwide. The submission period for the Television Academy Foundation’s 40th College Television Awards is Sept. 5 through Oct. 3, 2019.

Each year hundreds of graduate and undergraduate students, representing colleges and universities nationwide, submit their media projects to television’s most prestigious student competition—the Television Academy Foundation’s College Television Awards.

The College Television Awards honors achievement in student-produced programs and will feature stars from today’s top television shows presenting awards to winners at the red-carpet awards ceremony.

Emulating the Emmy® Awards selection process, entries for the College Television Awards are judged by Television Academy members. Top honors and a $3,000 cash prize will be presented to winning teams in eight categories: drama, comedy, animation, nonfiction, promotional, news, sports and variety. The College Television Awards also includes two additional, donor-supported, categories: the Seymour Bricker Humanitarian Award and the Loreen Arbus Focus on Disability Scholarship.

In addition to the awards ceremony, the nominees will take part in a three-day television summit hosted by the Television Academy Foundation. The summit, designed to enhance professional development, will feature panel discussions, studio tours and networking opportunities with industry executives and Academy members.

The College Television Awards often serves as an entry point for a career in television for nominees and winners. Past alumni have worked as editors, writers, producers and other positions on programs including Ray Donovan, The Handmaid’s Tale, Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan, CBS This Morning, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Grey’s Anatomy, 60 Minutes, Empire and many more.

For additional information, visit TelevisionAcademy.com/CTA.

To read the complete article continue on to The Patch.

Recognizing Hispanic Heritage

LinkedIn
Hispanic Heritage Month

From September 15 to October 15 in the United States, people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the group’s heritage and culture.

Monday, September 16 is Mexican Independence Day. Early on the morning of September 16, 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla summoned the largely Indian and mestizo congregation of his small Dolores parish church and urged them to take up arms and fight for Mexico’s independence from Spain.

His El Grito de Dolores, or Cry of Dolores, which was spoken—not written—is commemorated on September 16 as Mexican Independence Day.

Hispanics constitute 17.6% of the nation’s total population.

By 2060, the Hispanic population is projected to increase to 119 million.

As we celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, we recognize some of the contributions to trending Hispanic lifestyle, business and entertainment.

 

Eva Longoria Presents Eva’s Kitchen
Actress, New York Times bestselling cookbook author, and Texas-native Eva Longoria continued her partnership with FoodStory Brands, a family-owned Arizona-based company, to bring her recipes to life. Longoria collaborated with FoodStory Brands’ Fresh Cravings to create an authentic, fresh-tasting, Texas-inspired salsa, Eva’s Kitchen Cantina Style Salsa. Source: Fresh Cravings
Selena Gomez Tackles Swimwear
Selena Gomez is taking on a new title: swimwear designer. Gomez, already a notable fashion designer with her Coach line, teamed up with former assistant Theresa Marie Mingus and swimwear line Krahs. Gomez created the “Selena” suit, a high-waisted bottoms and bra-style top that was partially inspired by her kidney transplant scar. She also contributed a one-piece zip-up suit. Source: teenvogue.com
Gaby Natale Makes History With 4th Consecutive Daytime EMMY Nomination
Triple Daytime EMMY® winner Gaby Natale made history last spring when the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences nominated the SuperLatina host to a fourth consecutive Daytime EMMY® Award in the Outstanding Daytime Talent in a Spanish Language Program category. Source: AGANAR Media
Emilio and Gloria Estefan Receive 2019 Gershwin Prize
Husband-and-wife team Emilio and Gloria Estefan were the recipients of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. The honorees represent two firsts for the prize – they are the first married couple and first recipients of Hispanic descent to receive the award. Source: blogs.loc.gov
Hispanic Audiences Drove ‘La Llorona’ To $26.5M.

The Curse of La Llorona beat the $15M–$17M domestic tracking with a $26.5M weekend win largely built on Hispanic audiences turning up at 49 percent. With a release in 71 territories, making it the No. 1 pic abroad and in Latin America, Llorona’s global purse stands at $56.5M. hispanicprblog.com

Dora the Explorer Now Live Action!
The live action version of animated series Dora the Explorer—Dora and The Lost City of Gold—debuted in August. The film stars Eva Longoria, Michael Peña, and Isabela Moner. Source: deadline.com

Affordable, Culturally Relevant Tribally Chartered Institutions Help Native American Students Launch Careers

LinkedIn
American Indian College Fund

Education has been heralded as the “great equalizer,” but today only 14% of Native Americans in the United States ages 25 and older have a bachelor’s degree or higher—less than half of that of other groups.

The key to eliminating this disparity may be tribal colleges and universities (TCUs)— affordable, accredited, culturally relevant higher education institutions chartered by tribes serving Native students on or near Indian reservations. American Indian college graduates who attended TCUs enjoy significant benefits over college students attending other academic institutions, according to a new American Indian College Fund and Gallup survey report titled Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities.

The report shows TCU graduates are creating a unique and community-focused life after graduation, outpacing the efforts of graduates from mainstream academic institutions, as well as possible reasons for that, in the following ways:

TCU graduates are giving back to their communities. Seventy-four percent of TCU graduates surveyed say they have forged careers serving their communities and societies. More than half report a deep interest in the work they do in careers that serve their communities such as education, healthcare, social services, and more. Perhaps because of the ability to do work that they find meaningful, more than half of TCU graduates report they are deeply interested in the work they do (53%) and half (50%) say they have the opportunity to do work that interests them, compared to 38% and 37% of college graduates nationally.

TCU graduates received greater support in college. TCU graduates (43%) are more than twice as likely as American Indian/Alaska Native graduates of non-TCUs (21%) and college graduates nationally (18%) to recall experiencing three critical support measures in college: having a professor who cared about them as a person, having a professor who made them excited about learning, and having a mentor who encouraged them to pursue their goals and dreams. TCU graduates outpace non-TCU American Indian/Alaska Native graduates in all three measures, with the gap between TCU and non-TCU graduates the widest for having professors who cared about them as people (59% vs. 33%, respectively).

TCU graduates are more likely to be debt-free. TCU graduates are more likely to state their education was worth the cost—67% as opposed to 39% of college graduates nationally. Only 3% of TCU graduates took student loans as compared to 19% of students nationally, leaving them debt free as they pursue their preferred careers after graduation. Lack of debt also has a positive impact on college graduates’ financial well-being and that of their families.

TCU graduates are thriving in all aspects of well-being. TCU graduates report nearly twice as much as graduates nationwide that they are thriving financially, socially, and in their communities and careers.

Tribal colleges and universities are geographically and culturally diverse but share common goals such as integrating cultural values and connection to land into curriculum and pedagogy while emphasizing community outreach and education that is rooted in tribal identity and practice. In 2017, over 11% of American Indian students studying at a U.S. two-or four-year public or private not-for-profit postsecondary institution attended one of the 35 accredited TCUs.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “All of us who have worked with tribal colleges and universities since their founding in 1968 recognized that these place-based, culturally-rooted institutions transformed lives and communities. Through the support of Strada Education Network and a partnership with Gallup, we are able to provide the data to back this up. Our graduates tell the story of our success as tribal institutions. More support for tribal colleges and universities would expand this transformative experience to more Native and rural citizens.”

The Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey report is the result of a survey of 5,000 American Indian College Fund scholars to gather information about the value of an education rooted in Native American values. The survey was funded by a grant to the American Indian College Fund by the Strada Education Network.

To download a copy of the report, please visit https://collegefund.org/inside-the-college-fund/gallup-american-indian-college-fund-survey-report-tcu-alumni-outperform-other-college-graduates-affordable-culturally-relevant-tribally-chartered-institutions-help-students-launch-community-caree.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) National Convention is Coming to Albuquerque in September

LinkedIn
USHCC National Convention logo

The USHCC National Convention coming to Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 29th – October 1st, is the largest networking venue for Hispanic businesses in America.

For over a generation, the USHCC has served as the nation’s leading Hispanic Business organization, working to bring more than 4.37 million Hispanic owned businesses to the forefront of the national economic agenda.

The National Convention brings together Hispanic business owners, corporate executives and members of more than 200 local Hispanic chambers of commerce from across the country.

It offers the opportunity to establish strategic long-lasting business partnerships, through dialogue, networking, workshops, and more.

Business Matchmaking:
Matchmaking sessions are designed to provide a platform for Hispanic Business Enterprises (HBEs) to meet and engage in new business opportunities by introducing their companies and services to participating corporations. Tailored to help HBEs from across the country to meet with top corporations awarding contracts, the USHCC Business Matchmaking facilitates one-on-one meetings for Hispanic-owned businesses with procurement officials from industries ranging from energy, telecom, financial services and more.

There is no additional cost to attend the Matchmaking, a separate registration is required.

Business Matchmaking will take place on Tuesday, October 1st from 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM.

New this year is the added Supplier-Ready program component to prepare all Business Matchmaking participants with educational webinars from supplier diversity professionals and helpful tips to maximize their business matchmaking experience.

View highlights from last year’s convention below:

Continue on to ushcc.com to read more.

Not Only Does This New Clothing Charge Your Phone, It Can Protect You From Viruses and Bacteria

LinkedIn
man wearing a suit being splashed with water

A new addition to your wardrobe may soon help you turn on the lights and music—all while also keeping you dry, clean, and safe from the latest virus that’s going around.

That’s because Purdue University researchers have developed a new fabric innovation that allows wearers to control electronic devices through their clothing.

Purdue University researchers have developed a new fabric innovation that allows wearers to control electronic devices through clothing.

“It is the first time there is a technique capable to transform any existing cloth item or textile into a self-powered e-textile containing sensors, music players or simple illumination displays using simple embroidery without the need for expensive fabrication processes requiring complex steps or expensive equipment,” said Ramses Martinez, an assistant professor in the School of Industrial Engineering and in the Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering in Purdue’s College of Engineering.

The technology is featured in the July 25 edition of Advanced Functional Materials.

“For the first time, it is possible to fabricate textiles that can protect you from rain, stains, and bacteria while they harvest the energy of the user to power textile-based electronics,” Martinez said. “These self-powered e-textiles also constitute an important advancement in the development of wearable machine-human interfaces, which now can be washed many times in a conventional washing machine without apparent degradation.”

Martinez said the Purdue waterproof, breathable and antibacterial self-powered clothing is based on omniphobic triboelectric nanogenerators (RF-TENGs) – which use simple embroidery and fluorinated molecules to embed small electronic components and turn a piece of clothing into a mechanism for powering devices. The Purdue team says the RF-TENG technology is like having a wearable remote control that also keeps odors, rain, stains and bacteria away from the user.

“While fashion has evolved significantly during the last centuries and has easily adopted recently developed high-performance materials, there are very few examples of clothes on the market that interact with the user,” Martinez said. “Having an interface with a machine that we are constantly wearing sounds like the most convenient approach for a seamless communication with machines and the Internet of Things.”

The technology is being patented through the Purdue Research Foundation Office of Technology Commercialization. The researchers are looking for partners to test and commercialize their technology.

Continue on to Purdue University to read the complete article.

The Latin Business Action Network is recruiting Latinx CEOs for the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative

LinkedIn
Young Hispanic Businesswoman sitting in a office chairin Office

There is an educational opportunity coming up for any Latinx Hispanic-Owned Businesses. If you fit the criteria, you are encouraged to apply.

The Latin Business Action Network (LBAN) is recruiting 75-80 Latinx CEOs for the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative (SLEI); its next session (a cohort 8) will run from October 8 – December 7 at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA.

** You are expected to attend the in-person kick-off weekend on October 12th – October 13th, 2019 at Stanford GSB.

What is the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative-Education Scaling program?

The scaling education program is an immersive seven-week online program providing participants with valuable scaling frameworks, a diversified network of capital providers, business mentorship and a deep understanding of mobilizing resources for sustainable business growth.

For more information about the program go to: lban.us/stanford-latino-entrepreneur-leaders/

There are two visits to Stanford University Graduate School of Business (kickoff weekend and graduation).

Wells Fargo is one of the top sponsors of SLEI (this capacity building program has graduated more than 500 Latinx CEOs since its inception).

If you know or are a scaled Latinx entrepreneur (over $1 Million in annual gross revenues), please visit the recruitment/application page.

How Latinas Play an Important Role in Business

LinkedIn
Carmen Castillo headshot

Carmen Castillo was elected to be Chairwoman of the Board of Directors of the USHCC in 2018. She drives the direction of the USHCC and advocates on behalf of the Hispanic business community.

She is also the President and CEO of SDI International Corp. (SDI), which she founded in Florida in 1992. The company provides its clients with fully scalable global indirect procurement solutions for the tail-end, centered on Procure-to-Pay and Source-to-Pay.

As part of her responsibilities at the firm, Carmen is hands on with the overall coordination of company operations, global advertising, business development and marketing programs, along with proposal strategies and preparation.

What is your favorite aspect of being a Latina business owner?

There are about 26 million Latinas in the U.S., and the number of Latina-owned firms has shown tremendous growth in the past decade, at a rate over 130 percent. It’s a thrilling time: to be able to see the how Latinas—who will be a third of the U.S. population in a couple of decades—are contributing to, and will continue to have an enormous impact on the U.S. economy, and in policy.

We still have a lot of work to do: make sure that more Latinas have a seat at the table, in the boardroom, on ballots; keep identifying and supporting programs and funding sources that are truly inclusive, and enable other Latinas, and all women with equitable access to the tools, networks, education, and funding we need to align our potential with revenue-making opportunities.

What is the secret to building meaningful professional relationships?

Networking is part of my DNA, and I started my business initially to be a sort of matchmaker between companies and recruiters primarily in the IT industry. Going to industry and matchmaking events attuned me to supplier diversity, and that led to a transformation in from a small, Florida-based staffing company into a global procurement process outsourcing leader.

It was the connections, the conversations, the referrals, and the trust that we built from going to diversity council conferences, meetings and lots, and lots of networking events that truly opened the doors that made all the difference to our growth. Networking and making connections, and paying it forward by facilitating introductions are some of the best investments you’ll ever make, and the best favors you’ll do for anyone.

Who is your favorite female entrepreneur or influencer?

I’m lucky to work with a lot of amazing women from all over the world, through my work at SDI and the organizations that I support, and honestly, everywhere I go! It’s hard to point out one woman. I’ve been inspired by women who lead multi-billion-dollar corporations (or kingdoms!) and are as humble and approachable as they are brilliant.

I’ve been blown away by women who’ve survived war, violence, and abuse, and had the resilience to start businesses that brought transformative change to their communities. I know women who keep going, take care of their families, companies, employees and communities in spite of debilitating grief and illness. I can think of many more, and I know that the list can go on and on. Women are unstoppable.

How is the role of women in the workplace changing?

I really believe that most companies are committed to diversity and inclusion, and in the past couple of years we’ve seen a little progress in the amount of women in C-level jobs and in boardrooms, but we’re still mostly underrepresented, globally. What’s changing is the narrative; we’re more vocal about the gender and the hiring gap: women are less likely than men to be hired into a manager position, and more often than not there is only one woman in a group of top executives in any given company. Trends are moving upward, which is encouraging, but the pace is still slow.

Who inspires you?

This is another tough one; there a lot of people whose work and passion really take my breath away, but one of them is José Andrés, and not just because we share a love for cooking! He’s someone who’s really dedicated to giving back. There’s a lot to admire: he started World Central Kitchen right after the earthquake in Haiti, to help the country. He organizes meals for people in need throughout the globe, and his work in Puerto Rico after Hurricane María made him the Humanitarian of the Year—but what really inspired me is that he rose to help, and he never stopped giving. His spontaneous generosity is deeply touching to me.

Source: USHCC