5 Reasons to Consider a STEM Major

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By Erin Fox

As you begin to investigate what major you should pursue, you might find yourself drawn to a STEM major. STEM majors are diverse, challenging, and offer a wide array of opportunities. From to biochemists to ocean engineers and meteorologists to applied mathematicians, colleges are preparing students in these programs for future work in exciting careers.

There are many reasons to choose a STEM major.

  • Graduates have flexibility within their profession to pursue multiple career paths
  • Average starting compensation outpaces careers in other fields
  • High level of personal and job satisfaction
  • Graduates make a positive contribution to society. Most importantly? Once students have finished their education, career opportunities abound.

Graduates can look forward to:

  1. Future Opportunities
    Pursuing a STEM major will allow you a wide variety of future opportunities after graduation. For example, pursuing an engineering major opens many doors; a graduate can seek a career in such diverse fields as chemical engineering, computer science, or environmental science. A meteorology major can seek work in a variety of venues – graduates may work in a research capacity for a private company, such as Boeing, while others may pursue work for a government entity, such as NASA or NOAA. Some may choose to work in television broadcasting.
  1. Flexibility
    There are many different areas of specialization within any STEM major. When a student graduates with a strong undergraduate degree, she is preparing herself for any future changes in her chosen field. It is impossible to predict what the future holds. Consider Aerospace Engineering – from day one, students are immersed in hands-on opportunities, such as thermal energy, mechatronics, and rocket propulsion. These experiences not only prepare students for the current workforce but also give them the tools and skills necessary to help evolve their field of study far into the future.
  1. Compensation
    STEM careers are among the highest in initial compensation for recent graduates. According to the American Engineering Association, these graduates earn 87 percent more than the average salary of a non-STEM graduate. Specifically, the average starting salary for mechanical engineering graduates is $58,392 and computer scientists start, on average, at $61,205.
  1. Job and Personal Satisfaction
    Career Cast, an online employment site dedicated to targeted job information, published a list of the Top 10 Best Jobs based on job satisfaction. Based on their research, 8 of the top 10 jobs were within STEM fields. Included in this list are software engineer, mathematician, statistician, computer systems analyst, meteorologist, and biologist.
  1. Societal Impact
    Everyday life is constantly affected by professionals from STEM programs. Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics play a role in everything from creating new ways to promote aquaculture to the design of a bridge by a civil engineer. Being on the cusp of modern technology and using a STEM education benefits the world and has an important impact on both local, national, and global matters.

Many universities are proud of their world class education offered in all of their STEM programs. These programs have been developed to not only properly educate but also strategically prepare graduates for the future workforce. Considering an undergraduate degree in a STEM area of study not only meets a student’s current educational needs but will also help shape his future career and contributions.

Source: adastra.fit.edu

4 Questions Candidates Should Ask During a Job Interview

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Hispanic woman in interview

It’s a great time to be searching for jobs and exploring different opportunities. And ideally, that’ll mean going on lots of interviews.

Now, you’re surely aware that as part of the interview process, you’ll be asked a number of questions about your work experience, skills, and goals. But at some point during each conversation, you’ll most likely also be asked to come up with questions of your own. And that’s where a lot of job candidates find themselves stumped. Rather than let that happen, go in prepared with a list of insightful questions that show you’ve put thought into the role at hand. Here are a few you can start with.

1. How has the company evolved over the past few years?

Generally speaking, it’s best to work for a company that’s been showing signs of growth. And a good way to figure out whether the employer you’re applying to falls into that category is to see how it’s changed over the past few years. Ideally, your interviewer will give you insight as to how the company has progressed and developed its staff and product or service line. As a follow-up question, you might also ask how the company has adapted to recent challenges to get a sense of how it operates. Not only are these thoughtful questions, but they’re ones whose answers will inform your decision of whether to accept a job offer if you get one.

2. What has your experience been like working for this company?

Asking your interviewer about his or her personal experience working for the company you’re applying to is a good way to gain insight as to what your own experience might entail. It also shows that you’re taking an interest in your interviewer, and that you value his or her opinion.

3. What’s the company culture like?

You want to enjoy going to work, and a company whose culture promotes a pleasant environment is generally one worth pursuing. It’s always smart to ask about company culture during an interview because it can give you great insight into what your days might be like. Ask how the typical day goes for the average employee, and what steps the company takes to foster collaboration and teamwork. Along these lines, don’t hesitate to ask whether employees generally manage to maintain a decent work-life balance. While the answer might vary on a case-by-case basis, you should try to get a general sense of whether employees get enough personal time or are pushed too hard to always be available for work purposes.

4. What made the last person who filled this role successful?

Assuming you’re not the first person to land the position at hand, it pays to ask what made the previous employee good at what he or she did. Was that person a strong project manager? Was he or she a risk-taker? Asking this question shows you’re invested in being successful yourself.

The last thing you want to do during a job interview is come off as apathetic or unprepared. Before you sit down to meet with a prospective employer, jot down some important questions to ask in advance, or use the ones we’ve discussed here.

Continue on to YahooNews to read the complete article.

Cara Santana Joins Glamsquad As Their Global Engagement Officer After Her Success With The Glam App

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Actress and former CEO of The Glam App, Cara Santana, has joined Glamsquad as their Global Engagement Officer. The longtime actress founded The Glam App after struggling to find on demand beauty services during filming in more remote locations where services were not easily accessible. After exiting her own on demand beauty platform, Santana has recently joined the Glamsquad team to bring a fresh perspective to their scaling business model. She shares how she went from a Hollywood start to entrepreneur.

Yola Robert: You have pursued acting since the age of fifteen, but have always loved the world of business.  How did you shift from the acting world into the business world? 

Cara Santana: My fiancé is also an actor so I would end up getting a lot of attention on what I was wearing to events or red carpets when I was with him. He encouraged me to start a blog to keep meaningful conversation ongoing with women from around the world. I loved helping women feel like luxury was accessible. Eventually, I started working with brands as a digital influencer and that was my first foray into the business world.

Robert: The idea for The Glam App came to you when you were shooting Salem in Shreveport, Louisiana. What white space in on demand beauty did you discover while you were there?

Santana: I had arrived in Shreveport with only 24 hours to get rid of my acrylic nails, fake eyelashes and long ombre hair extension. I didn’t have transportation, they wouldn’t send anyone to me and I had no idea who I would even go to in the area. I thought to myself, “Gosh, this must be a problem that women find themselves in all the time.” I wanted to find a way to give accessibility to luxury beauty services at any time. As an actress I have developed relationships with so many hair stylists and makeup artists so it made sense to create an equally advantageous platform for not only a consumer of beauty, but also a provider of beauty. That was the catalyst to launching.

Robert: Being the founder and CEO of The Glam App was your version of business school. How was your experience going to business school in real life?

Santana: It was a long journey of trial and error. If I had known everything I was going to encounter and all the struggles that would have come my way, I probably wouldn’t have launched a business.

Robert: What advice do you have for women out there who are thinking about starting a business?

Santana: Firstly, You have to be super passionate about what you are doing. Secondly, surround yourself with people that are better at doing things than you are. I think the reason why The Glam App was so successful was because I hired people with my weaknesses as their strengths. Thirdly, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

This Latina Started A Studio With Her Family And Became One Of NYC’s Top Trainers In The Process

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Samantha Ortiz started a business before even realizing she started a business. A couple of times a week, her sister and her sister’s best friend would find themselves in the Ortiz family living room getting ready to be led in a workout by Samantha. Thanks to social media and personal referrals,what started with just the three of them slowly grew into more structured classes — and this was the beginning of Triple Threat Bootcamp, or the Ortiz family business.

“I outgrew my parents’ living room,” explained Samantha Ortiz. “I had to start running bootcamp classes in public parks and [eventually] I rented a small studio on the 3rd floor of a building, but [even that] still didn’t feel like home to me. I had this image in my head of having a fitness studio designed with monkey bars, a slam wall, a view overlooking Brooklyn, equipment all around the room and a place where my clients could call home. A few months after renting the small studio, my family and I were driving up Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn and as we stopped at a light, I looked up and saw a “for rent” sign. We called and the rest is history.”

Samantha’s mother, Aileen Ortiz, who now serves as President and CEO of TTB, never doubted the why behind her daughter’s decision because she related to it herself.

“I was motivated by the vision of seeing the three of us using our talents and skills to bring a healthy lifestyle to others,” shared Aileen. “My interest in healthy living began 26 years ago and I instilled that in my girls from a young age.”

The duo is rounded out by Christine Ortiz, Samantha’s sister and the studio’s Operation Manager and co-owner.

“We have always believed in health and wellness,” shared Christine Ortiz. “Combining fitness and nutrition was a no brainer once Samantha became a trainer. We wanted to impact more people in our community and be pioneers of female fitness entrepreneurship.”

With their mother at the helm, the studio has grown to be a staple in their Brooklyn neighborhood and has provided a platform for others to experience Samantha’s training style. This year, for a second year in a row, Classpass (the flexible fitness membership app) recognized Samantha as one of its top fitness instructors in New York City.

The recognition serves to underscore how Samantha’s mission behind TTB has simply been amplified as its grown.

“I was inspired to open Triple Threat Bootcamp because motivating others to be the best versions of themselves has always been my passion,” says Samantha Ortiz. “I felt like it was my mission to bring fitness and health to my community.”

Below Samantha shares more insight on what it has been like running a business with her mom and sister, what advice she has for other Latinas, and what she would do differently.

Vivian Nunez: What advice do you have for any Latinas who are looking to break into fitness and the business world?

Samantha Ortiz:I love to remind my fellow Latinas that anything is possible. Being Latina in the fitness industry and owning a fitness studio with your family (mom and sister) isn’t normal by any means but that’s what I love about it. You don’t have to follow the crowd, you can create your own lane. Don’t be afraid to go after what fuels your soul. Even if you don’t know everything, you will learn along the way. Life is about taking chances and learning from every experience. Last piece of advice, network. Go to events, reach out to people who are in your field of work. There’s nothing like being surrounded by like minded people.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

The Institute for Educational Leadership Launches Rise Up for Equity Campaign to Eliminate Barriers to Equity in Education and Workforce Development

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Latino Education News

The Institute for Educational Leadership (IEL) announced the launch of Rise Up for Equity, a digital and grassroots campaign to prepare, support, and mobilize leaders to eliminate systemic barriers to equity in education and workforce development.
This so everyone – especially transition-age youth and families in communities with inequitable opportunities across the United States – has the opportunity to succeed and lead independent lives.

“IEL incentivizes communities to innovate and prepares and supports local and state leaders to improve opportunity and outcomes, and close gaps in access and achievement in education and workforce development in under-resourced communities,” said Johan Uvin, President of IEL. “To us, equity is about creating more opportunities for success in education and workforce development for children, youth, adults and families, particularly in communities where that opportunity is lacking due to systemic and structural reasons.”

IEL’s strategy intends to help alleviate poverty and its impact and to contribute to creating new gateways to prosperity. Today 15 million children, or 21 percent of all children live in families with incomes below the federal poverty threshold, and 51 percent of students across U.S. public schools are low income.[1] Childhood poverty is associated with negative outcomes in adulthood, such as lower academic achievement, employment rates, and poorer health.

For more information about how you can Rise Up for Equity to support leaders so all children, young adults, and communities can succeed, visit www.riseupforequity.com or join the conversation on social media using #RiseUpforEquity.

[1] According to the 2016 fact sheet of the National Center for Children in Poverty (NCCP)

One female engineer shatters space’s glass ceiling

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How one woman overcame adversity and found success in space.

Diana Trujillo has always looked to the stars.

Growing up in Colombia during the 1980s, a place and time known for its civil unrest, she would stargaze to escape from the danger in her country. “I knew there had to be something better than this,” she recalls, adding, “Somewhere better than where I was.”

It’s that yearning which pushed Trujillo to immigrate to the United States with only $300 in her pocket, receive a degree in aerospace mechanics and biomechanics, and become one of the first Hispanic women to break into the aerospace industry.

Today, Trujillo oversees dozens of engineers and spearheads crucial projects, including a rover mission to Mars to explore the Gale Crater with one of the most technologically advanced rovers ever built.

We recently sat down with Trujillo to discuss resilience, the future of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), and her advice for thriving in a male-dominated industry. Here’s an excerpt of the conversation, edited and condensed for clarity:

Q:| You went from being a Hispanic immigrant who didn’t speak English to one of the country’s top female engineers. How did you turn what many would consider an adversity into an asset for your career?

It was an asset the whole time—I needed to decide how I would see it. My upbringing has taught me that you never give up. I’m not shy of asking what I want to do. I don’t run away from the problem; I run toward the problem. It’s something my peers find very valuable, because they know I’m going to grab any problem by the horns.

Q:| What’s been the biggest challenge in your career so far and what did you do to overcome it?

Honestly, the biggest challenge has been to get over myself. I often text my husband saying, “Oh, man, I’m in a meeting with 17 people and I’m the only girl.” So what if I’m the only girl? It doesn’t make me less capable. I’m all about having more women in the workforce, and having more women of color in the workforce. So, when there aren’t any other women in the room, I need to do my best and let other women in. If I’m too preoccupied about being the only one, I won’t perform.

Q:| What advice do you have for women to get over themselves, own a room, and own their place at the table?

It’s not about you; it’s about the goal. You need to focus on the goal. Nobody’s going to argue with you if your discussion is all about the goal. When the goal is bigger than you, it’s doesn’t matter who sets it because it’s for the greater good of the team.

Continue onto JP Morgan Chase to read the complete article.

Is college the only path? Picking the education that’s best for you

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Is college the best choice for you?

For generations, high school students like you have been told that a college degree is the route to success and financial security. But it’s not the only way to go: in fact, while it may seem like all your friends are heading off to college, a large number of high school graduates—about 30 percent—don’t take the college path.

Finding happiness and success in your career should start with evaluating your goals, personality and interests because—luckily—you have options.

With costs rising, college can be a huge investment, and like any good investment you need to understand the risk, costs and potential value you can gain. Explore these higher education paths—and some tips for calculating the return on investment (ROI) of your education:

Depending on your course of study, a vocational training program can pay for itself within eight months of graduation—far quicker than a four-year degree. Lynnette Khalfani-Cox

A four-year college:

A four-year college degree is the most common—and one of the most lucrative—routes to take after high school. But even with a four-year degree, much of your ROI depends on what you choose to study: before picking a major, think about how much money you’ll need to fork over and the salary you can expect after you graduate.

Many online tools or apps, like the JA Build Your Future app from Junior Achievement USA, or College Scorecard from the US Department of Education, can give you a good idea of the ROI on your college degree. They factor in average debt, starting salary information, and more, and work with community colleges, as well as four-year colleges and universities.

  • Tuition: According to the College Board, the total in-state cost of attendance at a public four-year college averages $25,290 per year. At a private, nonprofit university, the cost is almost double that—$50,900 annually. That means the overall price tag is roughly $100,000-$200,000. Not surprisingly, 65 percent of college grads earning four-year degrees in 2017 ended up with student loans; their average amount of college debt topped $29,650.
  • Salary: The upside of paying higher tuition at a four-year school is that you’ll likely end up making more money. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the median earnings for college grads with a four-year college degree is $61,724 annually. And salaries can go even higher, depending on the career you choose. People with advanced degrees typically earn bigger salaries—$1,512 weekly, or $78,624 yearly. Then again, advanced degrees also translate into extra tuition—another cost that you’ll need to factor into your ROI calculation. To avoid that extra cost, consider a bachelor’s degree with high earning potential for recent graduates like chemical or electrical engineering, which report salaries in the $70,000 – $75,000 range for recent grads.

Community college:

The National Center on Education Statistics shows that almost twice as many people attend two-year community colleges as those who attend four-year colleges and universities. At a community college, you can earn an associate’s degree after taking coursework in a general major—like business, biology, or communications—or in a specific vocational field, like nursing, criminal justice, or early childhood education. This coursework can prepare you for a bunch of careers, including medical assistant, police officer, oil and gas operator, or software or website developer.

  • Tuition: Community colleges are usually a lot less expensive than four-year schools: according to the College Board the total cost of attendance at a public, two-year community college averages $17,580 per year for in-district commuter students. That includes tuition, fees, room and board, books, supplies, and transportation costs. Overall, that works out to $35,160 for a two-year associate’s degree. That’s about $66,000 less than what you would spend on in-state tuition and fees at a four-year public college.
  • Salary: The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that people with a two-year degree earn a median salary of $825 a week or $42,900 annually. And while this salary might limit your ability to live in some quickly growing cities, there are a number of cities where you can live comfortably on less than 50,000 per year.
  • For some jobs requiring a two-year degree, the payoff is even higher. Air traffic controllers make a median income of $122,410, while dental hygienists average $72,910 and paralegals make $49,500.

Vocational training:

Vocational training, sometimes called technical training programs or trade schools, might be a good option if you prefer working with your hands, want to avoid a desk job, and only want to take training and instruction that is directly related to your future career. These programs commonly lead students into careers in hands-on trades like construction, metal work, masonry, and photography.

  • Tuition: The average cost for a vocational training program is $33,000 over a two year period, but many students can complete their vocational schooling in less than two years—especially those that enroll full-time in a trade school.
  • Salary: Salaries for hands-on trades vary widely, but jobs like installation, maintenance, and repair have median earnings of $950 a week, or $49,400 annually. With that kind of salary, your vocational training will pay for itself in just 8 months after your work start date.

Continue onto JP Morgan Chase to read the complete article.

How to Write an Impressive Cover Letter From Scratch in 30 Minutes

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You know enough to regularly update you resume—so if you find a job posting you’re interested in, you’re halfway through the application process.The other half, of course, is your cover letter. If you have some time and are just rusty, you can make a game plan to write a draft, then take a break, and come back to it with fresh eyes.

But if you see the deadline to apply is just 30 minutes away, you don’t have any time to spare. Here’s how to write a cover letter that will bolster your application—in just half an hour. (And if you need to revamp your resume or prep for interview in the same amount time, look here and here.)

Minutes 1 Through 10: Write Down Your Main Points

Maybe it’s just me, but I often struggle the most on the opening line of a cover letter. I know I shouldn’t lead with “My name is…,” and I want something that’ll grab the hiring manager’s attention. But my quest for the perfect beginning can lead me to spend 15 minutes (or more) typing and deleting the same line over and over. (And at that rate, my 30-minute cover letter would be all of two sentences.)

So, skip the intro if need be, and just start writing about why you’re a great fit for the open position. Don’t stress about the very best way to phrase your current responsibilities. Just write down your main points.

Need a prompt? Answer these questions: What do you find most exciting (or interesting) about the position? What relevant experience do you have? What would you bring to the role (and/or company) that’s unique to you?

Definitely make sure to have your resume and the job description open or printed out next to you. That way you can glance over at both and make sure you’re highlighting the right experience.

Minutes 10 Through 20: Add in Examples

OK, so you’ve written out all of reasons why you’re perfect for the job. Now it’s time to make sure you’re on the same page as the hiring manager. How so? Go back to that job description.

Re-read what the position calls for. Did you mention the experience and skills they’ll be screening for? To connect the dots in a way that’s clear—but wouldn’t be confused with a laundry list—add in an example or two.

If the job calls for people skills, swap out the line that reads, “I have excellent people skills” with a line that explains how in previous roles you’ve managed relationships with board members, which taught you about working with opinionated stakeholders. Does the position call for someone with sales experience? An anecdote about how you’ve been in sales since you set up your first lemonade stand when you were seven years old is memorable.

Continue onto Muse to read the complete article.

How to accomplish your biggest career goals this year

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employee meeting

If you’re thinking about going after a salary boost or new position in 2019, you’re not alone.

A December 2018 report from professional services firm Addison Group found that nearly half of job seekers are dissatisfied with compensation at their current job.

In addition, more than half of employees have negotiated their salaries with their employers within the past year, and 2 in 5 job seekers say their employers know they’re actively looking for a new job.

But whether you’re intent on boosting your pay or your job title in the new year, it helps to have a plan, These six steps will help you map out the best route to achieve your career goals in 2019.

1. Define your “what” and “why”

The first step to making your career goal happen is to clearly define it and know why you want it, says Lise Stransky, founder of career coaching firm Careers That Work for You. Think about whether you want to stay with the same company and get a promotion or raise, or move on and try something new.

And then think about the underlying, “Why?” Are you looking for career growth or simply more money? What is the need or want that is driving you to pursue these goals? Breaking out that component helps you in two ways: Keeping you motivated to pursue the goal, and understanding whether there is some other way this goal could be fulfilled, she says. For example, if you’re looking for more recognition, but your company can’t offer you a promotion, you may be able to negotiate a new assignment that will better position you for the next opportunity. If a salary increase isn’t possible, you may be able to negotiate remote work opportunities or other perks that have value.

2. Plan your ask around your company’s timing

While the tight labor market means that opportunities and salaries are trending upward, there may be factors that will affect your goals in your situation, says Lisa Quast, founder of Career Woman, Inc. and author of Secrets of a Hiring Manager Turned Career Coach: A Foolproof Guide to Getting the Job You Want. Every Time. For example, your company may be holding off on raises or promotions until the start of its next fiscal year. Or it may have a hiring or raise freeze. Your industry may have cycles that affect when employers are most likely to hire new people. Being aware of such timing can help you plan your goal more effectively, she says.

3. Examine your obstacles

J.T. O’Donnell, founder of Work It Daily, an online learning platform for people interested in building their careers, says that job seekers should dive into examining their negative self-talk to understand the obstacles they face—both real and perceived. “Straight to the negative,” she says. “I know that I’m up against that dang person inside your head 24/7. But I don’t have that luxury.”

Once you examine the reasons you think you can’t accomplish your goal, she can begin to work with you to break down the real issues, and those that are just perceptions to which her clients are clinging, she says. If you’re battling feelings of insecurity, you can begin to break down that negative self-talk so it doesn’t hold you back, she says. If you have a skills gap, you can pursue extra training or take on a stretch assignment to get the experience you need. Quast adds that, sometimes, simply having a plan to get the skills you lack may be enough for an employer to see that you know what you don’t know and are ready to grow into a new role.

4. Assemble the right team

O’Donnell suggests a strategic approach to recruiting the people who can help you accomplish your goals. Create a list of the people who have the careers and skills you admire, including at least three people who represent your definition of “success,” three people in the industry in which you want to work, and three people doing the job you want to be doing. Reach out to these contacts and work on building relationships with them. They each have insight into getting and doing the job that you want.

Mentors and coaches are important, too, O’Donnell says. You want to involve people who will motivate you and keep you accountable to moving forward on your goals, but who also aren’t too invested in you personally that they’re going to lose their objectivity, she says. “For a lot of us, our friends, our family, other people—they don’t have our career in their best interest, and they give terrible career advice,” she says.

5. Treat it like a project

If you were taking on a big new project at work, you would break down what you need have and do to accomplish the assignment successfully. Think about your career in the same way, Stransky says. “You don’t just have a house pop up and it’s done,” she says. First, you need a proper foundation, financing, and building team. “You can’t paint it until you’ve done all those steps, and I would say the same thing is true of trying to make change in a career,” she says.

It may help to create a written plan where you outline the steps you’re going to need to take, as well as notes about obstacles, opportunities, and people who can help you with both, she says.

Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

Creating Visibility and Supportive Campus Environments for Native American Students

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The American Indian College Fund explored how to support higher education’s role in creating safe and welcoming environments and greater visibility for American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) students at a convening it hosted of students, tribal college leaders and leaders from mainstream institutions of higher education (IHE), policy organizations and funders.

What we heard affirmed what we already knew — for Native students to be successful in college the institution must be committed to their inclusion.

Native students shared they want to go to college in an environment where their unique tribal identities are recognized, where their history and current lives are included in the curriculum and in campus life, and where they are visible.

Supporting education equity for Native students takes many forms. Native students at tribal colleges and mainstream institutions have benefited from Johnson Scholarship Foundation’s support of access to higher education through scholarships. The American Indian College Fund works to expand student support to specific ways that higher education institutions can be proactive with inclusion.

Four specific approaches were identified that can have an immediate impact on the experiences of Native students with higher education:

  1. Land acknowledgment: All higher education institutions exist on land that once served as the homeland of one or more tribal nations. Westward expansion, war and removal all impacted the abilities of tribes to situate themselves or have claims on homelands. When land acknowledgment occurs, Native students’ existence and experience is validated. I’ve learned that it is also a good educational exercise because most people don’t know whose homelands they are living on.

2. Representation in curriculum, at events and functions and in public materials: The history and contemporary experiences of indigenous peoples are usually not represented in curriculum. In addition, many times Native peoples are not onstage or giving presentations and are rarely included in public-facing places like websites and brochures. IHE can examine and modify curriculum to insure inclusion. For example, any American government class that doesn’t include tribal governments as a form of governance in the U.S. should immediately remedy that. When events are organized and representatives of various populations are invited to participate, inclusion of Native speakers should be automatically considered and materials and media should be reviewed to determine if Native student photos and stories are included.

3. Data inclusion: Ensuring the institution’s leadership knows the status of Native students is critical to success, whether it is one student or 400. Often the numbers are used as an excuse for not knowing the status of Native students and for not reporting that status to the public and to enrolled students. This may require extra effort to define who will be included in that population and what reporting will look like, but it is essential to overcoming invisibility.

Continue onto The Johnson Scholarship Foundation to read the complete article.

 

What Your Resume Should Look Like in 2019

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Resumes get a bad rap. We write them begrudgingly, usually during periods of transition, or tumult. We fiddle with phrasing and format, agonizing over how to craft our qualifications into the best resume possible. But it doesn’t have to be this way.

For smart job seekers, resumes are an opportunity — to make a case for their candidacy, to get the salary they’ve earned, and to convince any hiring manager she would be crazy not to hire them.

Yahoo MONEY teamed up with Dana Leavy-Detrick, founder of Brooklyn Resume Studio, to help you become one of those job seekers. Here’s how to write the perfect resume — and a free resume template that you can download and use for your next job interview.

Resume sample-Yahoo MONEY

(Resume design courtesy of Dana Leavy-Detrick; click here for a free downloadable template)

[1] The Best Resume Format

When it comes to resume format and design, opt for a clean layout. A recent study from the job site Ladders found that resumes with so-called F-pattern and E-pattern layouts, which mimic how our eyes tend to scan web pages, hold a recruiter’s attention for longer than those aligned down the center, or from right to left.

There is no one specific “best” font for resumes. You should use the same font style throughout, Leavy-Detrick says, but play with different weights and sizes to draw a recruiter’s eye to key parts of your resume. Sans serif fonts usually work best — Franklin Gothic, Calibri, and Avenir (the last of which we used for the attached template) are three of Leavy-Detrick’s favorites.

[2] Make Your Resume Stand Out

If you’re applying for an investment banking job, a hot-pink resume probably won’t do you any favors. But subtle pops of color, like the orange used here, will work for just about everyone.

“It’s very minimal, and gives a bit of a design element,” Leavy-Detrick says.

If you do use color, “Use it sparingly,” she warns. “Stick to one color, and one color that’s going to print well.”

[3] Add a Skills Section in Your Resume

Lead with the good stuff. The top of your resume should include “critical keywords and a quick snapshot of your core strengths,” Leavy-Detrick says.

Hard skills, tangible attributes that can easily be measured, take precedence here, so highlight them accordingly. If you’re in a tech-driven field, software and programming expertise is what employers want to see on your resume. If you’re in a creative industry, design and communication skills might be your best bet.

[4] Make a Resume That Shows Impact

To prove you’re worth a hiring manager’s time, highlight recent examples of what you bring to the table. Statistics that build upon your skills section are most impactful — bonus points if they show a track record of growth, revenue, and profitability, Leavy-Detrick says.

If you’re drawing a blank, she suggests adding resume skills that can help solve a “problem area” for the company you’re applying to.

“Impact doesn’t always have to be measured by metrics,” she says. “Cultural improvements, special projects, customer growth … anything that showed success can work.”

[5] What to Leave Off a Resume

Be discerning with the content—don’t list salary requirements, use tables or columns, or tick off every job you’ve ever had. The same goes for social media profiles. Unless your Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook feeds are relevant to the job you’re applying for, it’s probably best to leave those off your resume.

“Only include them if they add value in some way,” Leavy-Detrick says. “If you have zero followers, you may not want to advertise that.”

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