One-Year or Two-Year MBA: Is There a Simple Answer?

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There are now literally hundreds of MBA programs available worldwide. Evaluating an MBA today is roughly the equivalent of talking about a car—one needs more specific details to really understand how one program compares to another.

In the same way that there is often little in common between a small sports car and a large SUV, MBA programs come in many variations. Indeed, there are many comparative factors to consider, including a program’s standing in global rankings, academic design, specializations, entry requirements, delivery mode, or, most relevant to this discussion, its duration.

MBAs have become diversified products, catering to segmented clientele’s needs. Upon exploring whether a two-year MBA program is superior to a one-year program, there is, unfortunately, no simple answer to suit all circumstances.

Internships and career changes

The first argument in support of a two-year MBA program pertains to the job market. Even within a two-year program, students are under pressure, as they juggle academics with career-prep workshops. Most programs begin in August and employers arrive on campus as early as September to recruit, both for summer internships and full-time jobs. Many students say that they are unsure of the field in which they wish to specialize, yet are asked to commit to a job search within a chosen industry almost immediately.

In a two-year MBA program, this issue is actually less problematic. Students complete internships first and are then provided with additional opportunities to engage with employers the following autumn. Moreover, some students accept full-time jobs with the same employer, usually during the last two weeks of their summer internship. Most remain in the same industry, but move laterally to a different employer and/or to a different job category. Finally, some realize that the chosen industry was not for them and move to a different one altogether, typically seeking a different field of specialization in their MBA. Given the duration of the program, students will have one more round of campus recruitment and a full eight months of courses left, making such transitions possible and easy to make. We have found that students enter the next round of recruitment better prepared, more aware of their strengths and weaknesses, as well as their goals and aspirations.

A two-year MBA program allows more time to build a strong foundation

The second argument in support of a two-year MBA program relates to academics. To acquire in-depth knowledge, one needs time flexibility to build their schedule, as well as to digest and integrate content. While knowledge can often be acquired relatively quickly, developing competency requires more time. One needs to read, apply the material, build presentations, study, write exams, and experience the use of the material in real life.

One aspect that most professors will likely agree on is that the faster one is forced to learn something, the faster this material will be forgotten. A two-year MBA program allows more time to build a strong foundation, as well as to consider and select options within a given field. More time allows for more informed choices, and more informed choices translate to a more adapted education.

The third and final strength of a two-year MBA program is its resilience to errors. Students may not be aware of the different choices that exist in management education or on the management job market. If a student begins his or her studies in marketing and either struggles academically or lacks interest, there is time to reorient. As mentioned previously, if a student completes an internship and does not appreciate the practical aspects of a field, there is still time to change direction. Finally, it is also noteworthy to mention that a key advantage of an MBA is the networking opportunities that it brings. However, it can be more challenging to build lasting relationships over a more condensed period of time.

Value of one-year vs. two-year MBA may hinge on your circumstances

To summarize, the value of a two-year MBA program over a shorter one is essentially a matter of “it depends.” As a rule of thumb, the more removed an applicant is from the world of management at the time of admission, the more he or she should contemplate the two-year degree. The strength of a two-year program is the additional time that it affords to build expertise, explore the job market, and validate both academic and career choices. In my opinion, ideal candidates for such a program would be international students, as well as those seeking a career change, such as engineers, lawyers, teachers, artists and others who are interested in a management career and/or in relocating to a different country.

However, the closer one is to the world of management, the stronger the argument in favor of a one-year MBA. Those looking to move up in their career are the target clientele. Career climbers are less likely to feel the need to acquire knowledge of the job market, or to build strong foundations in management. Thus, students who meet this profile will likely be well-served by a one-year degree. This is why, after all, MBA programs of varying durations exist in the first place, as they are built to adapt to different clienteles and their respective needs.

Nevertheless, as the saying goes, the proof is often in the pudding. Indeed, this is probably the strongest argument of all: When given a choice to go faster, our well-informed students choose to take more time!

Author-Steve Fortin

Cmd-It Announces 2019 Richard A. Tapia Award Winner Cristina Villalobos

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Cristina Villalobos, Tapia award winner, poses in a gray blazer and red blouse

CMD-IT recently announced the recipient of The Richard A. Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science and Diversifying Computing is Cristina Villalobos, the Myles and Sylvia Aaronson Professor in the School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences at the University of Texas Rio Grande Valley and Founding Director of the Center of Excellence in STEM Education.

The Richard A. Tapia Award is given annually to an individual who is a distinguished computational or computer scientist or computer engineer and who is making significant contributions to civic areas such as teaching, mentoring, advising, and building and serving communities. The individual is also one who demonstrates extraordinary leadership in increasing the participation of groups who are underrepresented in the sciences.

“Cristina Villalobos is a leading mathematician in the fields of optimization, optimal control and modelling,” said Valerie Taylor, CMD-IT CEO and President.  “Throughout her career she has significantly impacted different applications areas through her research in optimization; impacting areas such as the treatment of eye disease and the design of antennas.  In addition, Cristina has focused on strengthening STEM academic programs, providing resources for the academic and professional development of students and faculty, and increasing the number of underrepresented students attaining STEM degrees.  She has been a leader in student mentoring, increasing the number of Hispanic students pursuing PhD’s in mathematics.”

The Richard A. Tapia award will be presented at the 2019 ACM Richard Tapia Celebration of Diversity in Computing Conference. Themed “Diversity: Building a Stronger Future,” the Tapia Conference will be held September 18-21, in San Diego, California.  The Tapia Conference is the premier venue to bring together students, faculty, researchers and professionals from all backgrounds and ethnicities in computing to promote and celebrate diversity in computing. The Tapia Conference is sponsored by the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM) and presented by the Center for Minorities and People with Disabilities in IT (CMD-IT).

The Tapia conference sponsors include Diamond Sponsor Qualcomm, Platinum Sponsors Caltech, Cornell Computing and Information Science, Georgia Tech, JP Morgan Chase & Co, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Rice University, Stanford University Computer Science, STARS Computing Corps, Two Sigma, University of California Berkeley, University of California San Diego Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, and University of Michigan. Gold Sponsors include Atlassian, Blendoor, Capital One, Cisco, CRA, Georgia Tech Research Institute, Google, Harvey Mudd College, Kennesaw State University, University of Maryland, College Park, University of North Carolina Charlotte and Virginia Tech. Gold Government Supporters include Argonne National Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratory.

The early bird pricing for the Tapia Conference ends July 8th. For more information and to register for the Tapia Conference, visit tapiaconference.org.

About CMD-IT

The vision of CMD-IT is to contribute to the national need for an effective workforce in computing and IT through inclusive programs and initiatives focused on minorities and people with disabilities. CMD-IT’s vision is accomplished through its mission to ensure that underrepresented groups are fully engaged in computing and IT, and to promote innovation that enriches, enhances and enables underrepresented communities. For more information, please visit cmd-it.org.

Google announces literary activities to help kids evaluate and analyze media as they browse the Internet

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Google is pleased to announce the addition of 6 new media literacy activities to the 2019 edition of Be Internet Awesome. Designed to help kids analyze and evaluate media as they navigate the Internet, the new lessons address educators’ growing interest in teaching media literacy.

They were developed in collaboration with Anne Collier, executive director of The Net Safety Collaborative, and Faith Rogow, PhD, co-author of The Teacher’s Guide to Media Literacy and a co-founder of the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Because media literacy is essential to safety and citizenship in the digital age, the news lessons complement Be Internet Awesome ’s digital safety and citizenship topics.

Overview of new activities:
1. Share with Care: That’s not what I meant!
● Overview: Students will learn the importance of asking the question: “How might others interpret what I share?” They’ll learn to read visual cues people use to communicate information about themselves and to draw conclusions about others.

2. Share with Care: Frame it
● Overview: Students will learn to see themselves as media creators. They’ll understand that media makers make choices about what to show and what to keep outside the frame. They’ll apply the concept of framing to understand the difference between what to make visible and public online and what to keep “invisible.”

3. Don’t Fall for Fake: Is that really true?
● Overview: Students will learn how to apply critical thinking to discern between what’s credible and non-credible in the many kinds of media they run into online.

4. Don’t Fall for Fake: Spotting disinformation online
● Overview: Students will learn how to look for and analyze clues to what is and isn’t reliable information online.

5. It’s Cool to Be Kind: How words can change a picture
● Overview: Students will learn to make meaning from the combination of pictures and words and will understand how a caption can change what we think a picture is communicating. They will gain an appreciation for the power of their own words, especially when combined with pictures they post.

6. When in Doubt, Talk It Out: What does it mean to be brave?
● Overview: Students will think about what it means to be brave online and IRL, where they got their ideas about “brave” and how media affect their thinking about it.

Expanding resources to families
YMCA
We teamed up with the YMCA across six cities to host bilingual workshops for parents to help teach families about online safety and digital citizenship with Be Internet Awesome and help families create healthy digital habits with the Family Link app. The workshops, designed for parents, coincide with June’s National Internet Safety Month and come at the start of the school summer holidays.

Continue on here to read more.

Nine higher ed institutions awarded ‘Seal of Excelencia’ for success with Latino students

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WASHINGTON — Nine institutions of higher learning across the country on Thursday received the first “Seal of Excelencia” for what the group handing out the award says is a commitment to Latino students and a demonstrated ability to serve them.

Deborah Santiago, CEO and co-founder of the group, Excelencia in Education, a nonprofit based in Washington that analyzes and measures institutions’ Latino enrollment and graduation rates, said the award was intended to establish “high standards of expectation that show an institution is truly serving Latinos.”

“They are trendsetters in what we think more institutions across the country need to be doing to make sure our Latino students in higher education are served well,” she said of the winners. “The seal sets a high standard and benchmark on what it means — and not just on enrollment.”

The group narrowed the winners down from an original list of 100 institutions.

“We look at several areas and at positive momentum in those areas: Are you enrolling Latinos? Are you retaining these students? Are you transferring them in or out? Are you supporting them financially? Are you graduating them? Do you have faculty and staff that represent them?” Santiago said.

“Are you partnering with community organizations and feeder schools to better prepare students, and are you working with the families on what is expected of the students. What percentage of faculty is Latino? What about administrators? Do you embrace your institution as one serving Latinos, and is it open and inviting to Latino students?” Santiago told NBC News.

One of the institutions that was recognized was Austin Community College, with 11 campuses serving more than 40,000 students; more than 45 percent of freshmen are Hispanic.

Dr. Virginia Fraire, Austin Community College’s vice president of student affairs, said, “The seal is an affirmation of what we do — we create an atmosphere for Latinos to thrive.”

“We serve students who may be the first in their families to go to college, and we have a very strong support network, with tutoring and coaching, and it’s a culture that we’re trying to create for students who may not be familiar with navigating the terrain to feel at home and feel that there is somebody here to help them be successful,” Fraire said.

Jodi González, from the Austin suburb of Kyle, Texas, said that her son Michael, who graduated this month from a nontraditional high school with a majority Latino student body, is heading to ACC in the fall in part because the college went out of its way to reach out to students like him.

“I liked that they have that kind of outreach in high school, not like some other schools such as UT that are basically waiting for people to come to them and are not doing any outreach,” she said, referring to the University of Texas. “ACC has a lot of options and different career paths, and there is exposure to all that. It’s a better fit for him because he would get swallowed up in a more traditional and large university setting,” she said.

In addition to ACC, the other institutions are:

Arizona State University
California State University Channel Islands
El Paso Community College
Florida International University
Grand Valley State University
South Texas College
University of Arizona
University of Texas El Paso

Continue on to NBC News to read the complete article.

The World’s Largest MBA Tour hosted by QS

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The World’s Largest MBA Tour hosted by QS is coming to a city near you! Attendees will have the opportunity to speak face-to-face with representatives from dozens of top international and local business schools and get all of their MBA-related questions answered!

Earn a salary boost, gain valuable leadership skills, or change industries altogether; the possibilities are endless with an MBA! This is a unique opportunity to meet face-to-face with top local and international business schools such as Brown University, NYU, INSEAD, and many more (check your local event page for a full list of participating schools).

At the event, you will be able to get all of your MBA-related questions answered under one roof as well as network with alumni and fellow attendees. Attendees will also be able to get their resume reviewed by a professional, a professional LinkedIn headshot taken, test prep resources, and so much more – all for FREE. And if that’s not enough, by attending the event, you’ll also gain access to scholarships worth up to $7 million that will help you succeed and get that MBA you’ve been dreaming of!

Additionally, the Toronto and New York events will both have a Women in Leadership workshop!

Take advantage of this partnership between Diversity Comm and QS and register for FREE to attend an upcoming event in your city!

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Get to Know the Scientist of the Year: Dr. Clarise R. Starr

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Dr. Clarise R. Starr—2018 HENAAC award winner for scientist of the year—is a supervisory biological scientist in the Aeromedical Research Department of the Air Force Research Laboratory, 711th Human Performance Wing, United States Air Force School of Aerospace Medicine, located at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

As the Deputy Division Chief, she is responsible for the research portfolios for the division. She leads and performs research in biological surveillance, human performance optimization, and force health protection against biological threats. Dr. Starr also serves as the laboratory director for the biological select agent and toxin research mission.

Dr. Starr discusses her career and offers her words of wisdom.

HISPANIC Network Magazine (HNM): What motivated you to become a microbiologist?

Dr. Clarise Starr (CS): I was always fascinated by the way a virus could mutate and the potential impact of outbreaks on mankind. I read the Hot Zone by Richard Preston and the Coming Plague by Laurie Garrett when I was in college, and I was determined to play some kind of role in preventing the end of the world by these pathogens.

HNM: What advice would you give other women interested in pursuing a career in STEM?

CS: Find good mentors and a good tribe to encourage you, especially when you are frustrated, because the path to a STEM career is not always easy, but it is very well worth it. I have been fortunate to have good mentors from grade school all the way to present day that I can bounce ideas and thoughts off of, and I think that has been part of my success. If you are interested in science, tell your teachers, your Girl Scout leaders, your family, anyone, and ask if they know any scientists whom you can talk to. Talk to as many as you can and then find opportunities to participate in science when you’re in high school, either through science fairs, internships or summer programs if they are available. Science fairs sometimes are judged by people in the community who have a science background, so those are easy networking opportunities. The more people you can talk to about what your interests are, the more insight you can get about types of schooling you need and jobs that are out there that you may never thought required your interests or skill sets.

ACT Center for Equity—Free Webinar on Using American Indian College Fund’s Guidebook for Native Americans

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Education professionals working with Native American high school students can attend a free webinar on Monday, June 3 at 2 p.m. EDT, introducing Native Pathways: A College-Going Guidebook, a new, culturally relevant guidebook for college-going Native students published by the American Indian College Fund. Practitioners can register for the event on the ACT’s web site, Students, school counselors, and others can download a free copy of the Native Pathways: A College-Going Guidebook on the College Fund’s web site.. Hard copies may be available for some high schools. Please send an email to nativepathways@collegefund.org for more information.

The guidebook was created as part of the Native Pathways to College Program, also funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. The College Fund launched the program to meet the needs of tribal communities and in response to the college-going and completion crisis amongst Native American and Alaska Native students. Research shows the national rate of all students going to college within six months of graduating from high school is 70%. For Native American and Alaska Native students, those numbers are closer to 20%.

The webinar, hosted by the College Fund and ACT’s Center for Equity in Learning, will:

  • describe the need for a guidebook tailored to Native students;
  • provide an overview of guidebook content related to how to get into college, choose a school, pay for it, and what to expect the first year in a way that speaks to Native cultures;
  • demonstrate how practitioners can use the guidebook in daily work with students.

The College Fund knows that education improves the lives of individuals, their families, and entire communities, yet merely providing scholarships to help students pay for college is not enough for Native students to succeed. It is critical to include Native students in conversations regarding educational equity. This new Native Pathways guidebook is a great starting point to guide practitioners in their conversations. The College Fund initiated the program to create a college-going culture, working with high school students, first-year, students, and two-year college students seeking to continue their education at a four-year school. With a $2.5 million grant renewal from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, the College Fund will continue to increase college access and success.

About the ACT Center for Equity in Learning

At ACT, we believe that talent and potential are widely distributed across society, and that the circumstances of a child’s birth should not determine their college and career opportunities.

ACT Center for Equity in Learning aims to help underserved learners and working learners (individuals who are employed while also learning new skills in pursuit of greater success) achieve education and career success.

Through purposeful investments, employee engagement, and thoughtful advocacy efforts, the Center for Equity in Learning supports innovative partnerships, initiatives, campaigns, and programs that help young people succeed in education and the workplace.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Looking for a STEM Job? Head to These States

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Milken Institute’s 2018 State Technology and Science Index, a biennial assessment of states’ capabilities and competitiveness in a tech-focused economy, ranked the top ten states to pursue a STEM career.

  1. Massachusetts
  2. Colorado
  3. Maryland
  4. California
  5. Utah
  6. Washington
  7. Delaware
  8. Minnesota
  9. New Hampshire
  10. Oregon

“The success stories of states profiled in this year’s index reflect sustained efforts to not only build but to maintain their ecosystem,” said Kevin Klowden, executive director of the Milken Institute Center for Regional Economics. “Making the changes that are necessary to perform well on the State Technology and Science Index can contribute to stronger long-term economic performance.”

Massachusetts benefitted from the presence of major research universities, the availability of venture capital, entrepreneurial expertise, and a tech-oriented workforce, according to the report. The state was first in three of the index’s five composite indexes and finished third in another. Massachusetts continues to strengthen its position in tech and science by increasing public funding of neuroscience research, cybersecurity innovation, and startup development.

Utah’s move to fifth was driven by tech-sector employment growth – the fastest in the nation – averaging 4.3 percent annually. The state also had the most university graduates with degrees in science and engineering – 15.4 per 1,000 students. Utah stood out for the success of its universities in spinning research into commercial ventures.

Delaware rose to seventh from tenth, strengthened by an increase in venture capital invested in technology companies. The Legislature authorized a 25 percent tax credit for small companies (those with fewer than 25 employees) engaged in research and development in specific high-tech fields. The state ranks fifth in the number of business startups with 53.4 per 1,000 residents.

The State Technology and Science Index provides a benchmark for policymakers to evaluate their state’s capabilities and formulate strategies for improving STEM education, attracting businesses, and creating jobs in the tech sector. Indices considered in the report include the number of patents issued and doctoral degrees granted in each state.

“Investing in human capital and developing a STEM workforce is crucial for regional economies that want to attract large technology companies and the jobs they bring,” explains Minoli Ratnatunga, Milken Institute’s director of regional economics research.

In addition to the index, the report offers case studies that examine issues such as non-compete contracts that limit employee mobility, along with access to higher education in building a vibrant, adaptable workforce.

Drawing on this data, the report recommends four steps policymakers can take to improve their state’s competitiveness:

Increase scholarships and other financial aid to lower the cost of higher education for in-state students who plan STEM careers.

Better align STEM curriculums to make it easier for students to transfer credits from lower-cost two-year colleges to four-year institutions.

Encourage partnerships between higher-education institutions and private companies to provide students with work experience to improve workforce readiness and job placement.

Make employee noncompete laws less restrictive to encourage a freer exchange of ideas and talent among tech companies.

The index draws on data from government and private sources dating from 2015 to 2017, including the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the National Science Foundation, the Small Business Administration, the American Community Survey, and Moody’s Analytics.

Source: milkeninstitute.org

How Concierge Parenting Services Can Help Prepare Kids for College

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College admissions issues has been stealing the headlines. From the college admission scandal, where wealthy people allegedly paid to help their kids get accepted to high ranking colleges, to the talk of adding diversity scores to help boost some SAT/ACT tests, the news is filled with the challenges that those wanting to go to a good college may face.

Some parents are opting to take an approach that is more tailored to helping the child become prepared to excel and get into the college of their choice. This new approach, called concierge parenting services, aims to provide a customized plan to take the child to the next level, by identifying their fullest potential and capitalizing on it.

“Too often, the approaches taken in schools are failing students. Every child learns differently, so a cookie cutter approach just doesn’t work,” explains Reena B. Patel, a parenting expert, licensed educational psychologist, and author, who offers virtual workshops. “Through concierge parenting services, parents can learn exactly what their child needs to focus on in order to excel. The plan has been tailored to their unique child.”

Recently, Gallup suggested that education in the country takes the opposite approach of standardized tests, which students are being inundated with around the nation. What they suggest is that students need a test that is for them and about them, so that they become better at understanding and developing their own unique talents, which will help them succeed in school and life. This is the goal of concierge parenting, too.

Concierge parenting is service offered by Patel and other professionals in the field, in which they conduct extensive assessment on the child. Here are some of the ways that concierge parenting services can help prepare kids for college:

  • The assessments that are conducted show a child’s strengths, so that they can capitalize on them in order to reach their goals.
  • Parents receive a customized learning profile of their child, which will give insight as to how they best learn and optimize their strengths while developing areas of need. Parents can use that information to ensure that their educational needs are being addressed and how to take their child to the next level of growth.
  • Their learning profile includes such things as the child’s emotional resilience. This is important information, because it sheds light on how well the child will adapt to stressful situations or challenges. They can use the information to help the child learn more coping skills.
  • Parents receive the tools that they need in order to help their child navigate studying, taking tests, and applying for colleges. Rather than guessing how to best go about these things, the information has been tailored to the needs and styles of the individual.
  • Similar to a concierge in a hotel, parents get a tailored approach that is focused on meeting their needs and ensuring their child’s success. By taking advantage of a service like this, parents can learn their child’s strengths then nurture them and focus on excelling those strengths to be the best version of themselves.

“If you want to feel confident about your child’s education and future college acceptance, you can’t go wrong with taking a concierge parenting approach,” added Patel. “The purpose of concierge parenting is to help remove the stress, hurdles, and disappointment that may come later on. It helps your child to set out on their path with a detailed map to help them successfully get there.”

Patel offers several concierge parenting services packages, including being able to tailor a program to meet individual needs and goals. Two of her popular packages are titled Optimal Learning and New Parent. The Optimal Learning package offers a comprehensive assessment, customized report with specific tools to apply, follow up emails to ask questions, comprehensive evaluations to include, but not limited to, intelligence testing, academic testing, social and emotional readiness, and executive functioning testing. The New Parent package focuses on the idea that every baby and child is unique and has a different temperament. It’s ideal for new parents or a parent of a teen. Finding time to address challenges, such as behaviors, or how best to get your baby to sleep is hard. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a service customized just for your family and child? One that is effective and developed by a professional expert.

Each concierge parenting package includes initial consultation to identify concerns and goals, three session observation, modeling, and implementation of expert techniques, and one follow up virtual call after strategies are implemented.

In addition to offering concierge parenting services, Patel is the founder of AutiZm& More. As a licensed educational psychologist and guidance counselor, she helps children and their families with the use of positive behavior support strategies across home, school, and community settings. She does workshops around California, and virtual workshops globally where she provides this information to health professionals, families, and educators. She is also the author of a book that helps children with anxiety coping strategies called “Winnie & Her Worries,” and author of a book about autism awareness and acceptance, called “My Friend Max: A Story about a Friend with Autism.” Both of her books are available on Amazon. To learn more about her services, visit the website at reenabpatel.com.

About Reena B. Patel
Based in the San Diego area, Reena B. Patel (LEP, BCBA) is a renowned parenting expert, guidance counselor, licensed educational psychologist, and board-certified behavior analyst. For more than 20 years, Patel has had the privilege of working with families and children, supporting all aspects of education and positive wellness. She works extensively with developing children as well as children with exceptional needs, supporting their academic, behavioral and social development. She was recently nominated for San Diego Magazine’s “Woman of the Year.” To learn more about her books and services, visit the website at reenabpatel.com, and to get more parenting tips, follow her on Instagram @reenabpatel.

Gallup. It’s time to try the opposite of standardized testing. gallup.com/education/237284

American Indian College Fund Awards More Than $17K of “Think Indian” Grants to Support the Vibrancy of Native American Students Nationwide

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The American Indian College Fund’s “Think Indian” Community Awareness program awarded seven non-profit, accredited colleges and universities with $2,500 grants to promote the vibrancy of Native American students, scholarship, and communities.

The American Indian College Fund’s “Think Indian” Community Awareness program awarded seven non-profit, accredited colleges and universities with $2,500 grants to promote the vibrancy of Native American students, scholarship, and communities.

“Think Indian” was originally created in 2009 as a public awareness campaign to promote the American Indian College Fund and the contributions Native American scholars make to our world. The “Think Indian” campaign was renewed in 2018 to promote the American Indian College Fund’s scholarship and support programs for Native students. The “Think Indian” Community Awareness Grants will support specific efforts of Native-serving colleges and universities, helping them better raise awareness and connect with students and tribal communities.

The following seven higher institutions were awarded grants under the program:

Idaho State University (ISU) – ISU will hold its Bengal Warrior Bootcamp July 25-26, 2019, engaging students in physical and educational challenges. Participants from the Shoshone-Bannock Tribal community will participate in two days of college preparatory workshops and obstacle course drills to prepare them for the future.

Redlands University – Redlands’ Native Student Programs will bring students and community members together this summer to create a mural to inspire Native people to seek higher education. Prospective students will write essays about what it means to “Think Indian” and share their thoughts at a ceremony unveiling this art project.

College of Menominee Nation (CMN) – CMN will reach out to the thousands of attendees of the Menominee Pageant at their annual powwow contest. They will highlight profiles of exceptional Native students and scholarship opportunities in the pageant program and distribute “Think Indian” pageant shirts to further raise awareness.

George Washington University (GWU) – GWU’s Center for Indigenous Politics and Policy will create an indigenous guide to D.C., including a walking tour map and associated mobile application. The guide will highlight sites of importance to Native people throughout our Nation’s capital. GWU will raise general awareness of the tool and incorporate it into their pre-college preparatory program for Native students.

Leech Lake Tribal College (LLTC) – LLTC will implement a multi-platform promotion of the college and scholarship opportunities throughout the summer, inviting prospective students to “Think Indian: Come Find Your Place.” Using targeting info from a community needs survey, they will launch social media posts, flyers, advertisements and banners – creating new content to better reach their audience.

New Mexico State University (NMSU) – NMSU hosts a Dreamkeepers Summer Enrichment Program June 16-28, 2019, for Native American high school students in New Mexico. Student participants will create a landmark mural in Las Cruces, celebrating Native American vibrancy and resiliency. And Native hip-hop artist Tall Paul will deliver an inspirational speech and perform a free concert for their community.

White Earth Tribal and Community College (WETCC) – WETCC will host a Boarding School Awareness Campaign and Healing Event in August to educate and provide a space where Native Americans of all generations can recover from the brutal effects of colonization. WETCC will create a traveling art exhibit, communicating the timeline of boarding schools’ impact – and will host a healing ceremony with a meal and a screening of Iron Horse, a documentary about boarding schools.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

What to Expect From Your First Job Out of College

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You’ve graduated college — congratulations! You are now ready to enter the professional world and start building your career with your first job out of college. The prospect can be very exciting and more than a little intimidating.

Remember how big your college campus seemed when you first arrived as a freshman? You were unfamiliar with the buildings and there were a lot of new people. But by your sophomore and junior year, you had it all figured out. As a senior, you felt as comfortable at college as you did at home.

Get ready to feel like a freshman again. Your first job out of college is a foray into the unknown, but that doesn’t mean you have to go into it completely blind. Here are few things you should expect from your first job after college. But first, what does “entry level” even mean?

What does “entry level” mean in terms of your first job after college?

Just like it sounds, an entry-level job is meant to get your foot in the door at a company. It may not require a lot of the specific skills that are expected of higher-level employees — it’s a training ground for new employees. However, the competition can be steep, so don’t assume you’ll get the first job you apply for just because you have that shiny new degree. You’ll need to think carefully about what you accomplished in college outside of the classroom and frame that properly on your resume. Did you have a part-time job, an internship, or work-study? Perhaps you were the leader of a campus organization. Anything that you can leverage to show that you’ve learned discipline and leadership skills can help give you an edge over the competition.

Now that you know what “entry level” means, here’s what you should expect when you land the job.

You need to be communicative

The ability to communicate clearly and effectively both in person and in print is an essential part of most businesses. Employers look for that in candidates — especially when it comes to entry-level candidates. An applicant with a strong resume but poor communication skills may lose out to a lesser qualified candidate who knows how to get his or her point across clearly.

Why? Because the same holds true after the person is hired. In today’s workforce, the ability to communicate is crucial. Whether it’s person to person, in meetings, or via email, communication skills are a must-have for employees at any level. But don’t just declare that you’re a good communicator; employers need to see it in action.

Make note of any internships, jobs, or even hobbies that showcased your ability to communicate verbally or otherwise. Most importantly, when you are looking for that entry-level job, make sure that everything they see shows how well you communicate. Your Linkedin bio, other social media, and especially your cover letter should be interesting and clearly get your message across.

If you do all of those well, you’ll set the table for a great first interview.

You won’t get paid a lot

Most entry-level jobs come with entry-level pay. Think carefully before you accept a job offer. This will likely be your pay for the next year. Most employers do not negotiate or give raises after three or six months anymore. On the bright side, while it may not pay as much as you were hoping to make, it’s probably a lot more than you were making in college.

Remember, it’s not about this job; it’s about where this first job out of college can take you. Do you know what you want to be doing in five years? Think about it because employers will ask, and they want to know that you have a plan.

Related: How to Answer “Where Do You See Yourself in 5 Years?”

You won’t get the “fun” tasks

You chose your field of study with certain jobs in mind. However, those jobs are probably at the higher end of the pay scale. For your first job out of college, you will find yourself doing things that may seem menial or beneath you. There are a few reasons for this.

First, as an entry-level employee, you’re at the lower end of the pay scale, therefore the lower-end tasks go to you. Secondly, and this is really important for you to realize quickly, you’re being tested.

If you want to get bigger, more exciting tasks to handle at your new job, you need to knock those trivial ones out of the park. Don’t just shuffle through them. Take care of your assignments and maybe even see if there is a better way to do them. When you show that you can handle these little jobs, and handle them well, you’ll earn the opportunity to get cooler assignments.

You need to embrace variety

Not only will you be doing things that may seem trivial to you, but they may not be relevant to your field of study at all. This can be challenging or even frustrating, but at this stage of your career, you can do yourself a big favor by embracing these diverse tasks. Why? By engaging yourself fully in a variety of jobs, you will give yourself a chance to discover what you really like to do. Maybe what you thought you’d like isn’t what you do best.

In any case, you’ll want to work to the best of your ability at this first job. Even if you find out what you don’t like doing, that can help you guide your career.

Your attitude matters more than ever

In college, you just needed to get your work done and done well. Once you enter the workforce, there’s a lot more to it. It’s not just what you do and how well it’s done — it’s how you do it. Do you roll your eyes when given an undesirable task? Do you pay attention in meetings, or are you zoned out or playing with your phone? Once you have a foothold on your career path, it’s not just about getting the work done, it’s about finding better ways to do it. Always be engaged and enthusiastic.

Does this mean you can’t challenge your boss on certain things? Absolutely not. If you believe you’re being treated unfairly or need a change of scenery, you need to speak up for yourself. Get your thoughts together and have a detailed argument for your points. A good boss respects an employee who is willing to speak up when they have a legitimate complaint.

You have more to worry about than just yourself now

You’ve grown used to being on your own and realizing that the choices you make impact your life. Once you join a new company in your new first job out of college, there’s more to it. It’s not just about you. The choices you make can affect those in your department or even across the whole company.

Sick days are a great example of this. They’re willing to pay you not to come to work when you don’t feel good. How cool is that? However, think about what will happen at work if you do call in sick. Who has to cover for you? Will they have to call someone else in on their day off? Will another worker be responsible for their own job plus yours?

You’re part of a team now, and while it’s okay to use sick days when you’re really sick, you have to be aware of how your choices affect the rest of your team. This same mode of thinking needs to go into every work decision that you make. Your employer needs to know that they can depend on you.

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