“America’s Top 50 Organizations for Multicultural Business Opportunities” Announced

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Today, OMNIKAL announced “America’s Top 50 Organizations for Multicultural Business Opportunities”,  known as the “Omni50.”

The Omni50 represent the top 50 U.S. organizations who are awarding the most business to the growing culturally diverse marketplace. These same organizations are also successfully appealing to the growing millennial generation, which, by 2020, will be the largest diverse market segment in America (a market segment that is forcing brands to evolve from minority/diversity paradigms to inclusion).

Apple Inc. was named the #1 Organization for Multicultural Business Opportunities in the United States. Other companies at the top of the winners list include: Walmart Inc., Northrop Grumman Corporation,AT&T Inc., IBM, The Coca-Cola Company, Bank of America, Raytheon Company, Verizon, General Motors Company, Time Warner Inc., PepsiCo Inc., United Parcel Service, Cisco Systems, Inc., Colgate-Palmolive Company, Altria Group and The Kroger Company.

Who are the Omni50?

The Omni50 represents the voice of OMNIKAL’s 2,100,000 members. The list is circulated by over 1000 organizations, which reaches millions of consumers every year. Since 1999, it has become a highly valued metric of excellence in reaching the diverse and inclusive majority marketplace.

The Omni50 Awards is the most recognized honor for diversity and inclusion in the country.  These award-winning companies truly differentiate themselves in the marketplace in a time when inclusion has become one of the most important goals of every organization. It is also at a time when public recognition is key to ongoing financial, ethical, social and cultural success.

“The inclusion practices of the “Omni50” Awardees have changed the course of our current economy and as a result, the world as we know it” said Kenton Clarke, CEO of OMNIKAL. “The changing multicultural and multi-generational landscape of our country has demanded this evolution. OMNIKAL is proud to have been a force in the business world for such positive change. Our mission and goal is to equalize, broaden and level the playing field for both brands and an increasingly varied vendor/supplier marketplace.”

Top Honors for Top Organizations Who Do the Right Thing

Most “top” lists honor companies for traditional economic growth, shareholder returns and similar metrics; however, the Omni50 awards are an indicator of which organizations provide the best business opportunities to the increasingly inclusive majority marketplace. This, in turn, influences more organizations, as they compete for market share in multicultural and multigenerational communities.

The Business Power of Inclusion

As the culturally diverse market gains more buying power, corporations have to focus their efforts on rebranding and reorganizing to avoid losing market share and to remain current and relevant.

The Omni50 list has therefore become the most critical guide for businesses as well as consumers. “As a business owner, I appreciate the business we receive from corporate buyers; and in turn, when I buy either personally or for my company, I am more likely to buy from the same companies that support my business or are supporting businesses like mine,” said Kathy Steele, principle of Red Caffeine headquartered in Elmhurst, Illinois.

About OMNIKAL

OMNIKAL was founded in 1999. Now the Nation’s largest inclusive business organization, OMNIKAL promotes entrepreneurship and the belief that entrepreneurs create real world solutions to today’s business and economic challenges. By fostering deeper and broader collaboration between business owners and entrepreneurial support organizations, the OMNIKAL network fuels healthier ecosystems through job creation, professional development and drives innovation resulting in strong economic growth.

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Click here to see the full list of companies

This Latina VP Believes This One Trick Will Help Build A Diverse Pipeline

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Carly Sanchez has led with a people first mindset since the beginning of her career in higher education, now as the Executive Vice President and Head of Talent Acquisition Strategy and Delivery at Wells Fargo she is able to scale her impact.

“[My role] encompasses the leadership of all team member hiring globally for positions across Wells Fargo at all levels, with an emphasis on targeted recruiting for diverse segments,” explains Sanchez. “I serve as the primary liaison to the Chief Diversity Officer for all human capital diversity issues.”

As a Latina, Sanchez understands the impact of having the right structures in place that would help facilitate not only the hiring of a diverse talent pool, but also its retention.

“I think it is critical for Latinas to serve as sponsors and actively engage in identifying and sponsoring talent for positions to advance careers of those coming through the ranks,” shares Sanchez.

The goal is to ensure that those who are talented and qualified have the opportunity to walk through the right doors and feel like they belong.

“I gain the greatest satisfaction from helping identify diverse talent and enabling their future path through education as an admissions officer and now through facilitating opportunities for career advancement through recruiting, hiring and D&I work,” says Sanchez.

Below Sanchez shares more about her day-to-day work, what her hopes are for Latina peer mentorship, and her advice to all who are navigating corporate ladders.

Vivian Nunez: How would you define your career’s mission and how do you implement it on a day to day? 

Carly Sanchez: My career mission is to optimize opportunities for talented individuals that will allow and enable them to maximize that talent in an environment that is conducive and values a diversity of perspectives and backgrounds. On a day to day level, my role now is less focused on individual positions for which we are hiring (although I still do stay involved in that) and now more focused on designing a strategy and organizational structure that will enable the businesses and functions at Wells Fargo to attract and promote the best most diverse mix of talent to support the work.

Nunez: How do you ensure that hiring is as diverse as possible? 

Sanchez: Outreach and sourcing of diverse talent pools is critical, building the pipelines in advance of the opening of a position. This enables us to build diverse candidate slates for review and increases opportunities for selection in an equitable process. Our team partners with many diversity focused organizations to build talent pools, targets potential sources of talent (for example, working with military bases for hiring of transitioning military etc.), partners with HR partners and hiring managers to identify where we may have greater opportunity to increase diversity at all levels of the organization, and consults on issues related to D&I including how Unconscious Bias can negatively impact our commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce.

Nunez: What advice do you have for Latinas who are looking to break into spaces that are predominantly white? 

Sanchez: Mentoring and sponsorship can be critical as Latinas look to bring their talent to different challenging environments.  Identifying individuals who can help you learn more about the role and meet individuals working in these organizations is ideal. It is also important to research and educate oneself about the organization, including developing a detailed understanding of the mission, the day to day work and any available information on the organization. This demonstrates your true interest and commitment when you have an opportunity to connect.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

The iGen iEverything Train is Coming, but Are You Ready?

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iGen

Technology is being consumed at an ever increasing rate causing executives, managers, and process improvement experts on the factory floor to re-define the methods of training and dissemination that have become obsolete.

Critical skills and tribal knowledge are being lost as boomers retire and training plans for new employees fall short of preparing workers for the sophistication of the new manufacturing environment.

Move over millennials, here comes the IGen! Born between 1995 and 2005 this group of tech savvy natives is the next cohort and are just now entering the workforce. IGen, or Gen Z as they are often referred, have grown up in a world of social media where Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter reign supreme. These kids are a force to be reckoned with and require access to information in ways that are familiar, immediate, and actionable. Our success depends on them because as the IGen goes, so goes the manufacturing industry, the nation, and the world.

Alliance Resource Group, in partnership with Sify Technologies has pulled together experts from manufacturing, academia and automated methodologies to develop a solution that addresses the manufacturing challenge of this next generation and identifies the key components of a successful framework including content management, dissemination methodology, scalability, and integration with current learning management systems. These components constitute a micro-learning strategy that facilitates current and future state requirements.

Alliance Resource Group (ARG), is a service disabled veteran owned business located in Newport Beach California. With a foundation in resource management, recruiting, and consulting, ARG provides services to small and medium size companies throughout the United States.

View the ARG White Paper here! Better be prepared for total process transformation if you want to remain competitive.

A-Rod In Paradise: Swinging For Redemption Through Baseball And Business

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Even as Alex Rodriguez sits contemplating a platter of raspberries at the Four Seasons in Austin, he is chasing something. The day before, in preparation for his new gig as an ESPN Sunday Night Baseballanalyst, he visited three teams at spring training in Arizona. Today in Texas, he gave a keynote address at South by Southwest titled “Baseball, Business and Redemption” with CNBC chairman Mark Hoffman. And later he’ll jet home to Miami to spend time with his two daughters before heading to Tampa to see the Yankees in his role as special advisor.

“I’m totally grateful for where I am today and do not take anything for granted,” the 42-year-old Rodriguez says. “And I felt that once I owned all of that and started digging myself out of this black hole, I wanted to come out a different person.”

What Rodriguez is chasing these days is redemption–and in the wake of his 2016 retirement, he’s finding it by analyzing baseball and business. He debuted as a commentator for Fox last year before adding the ESPN job, remarkably coexisting with rival networks. Rodriguez also oversees A-Rod Corp, which includes real estate investments (13,000 units across ten states), conditioning companies (from UFC-branded gyms to TruFusion, a kettle-bells-and-hot-yoga outlet) and startups (with stakes in Josh Kushner’s health insurance company, Oscar, as well as the ride-sharing service Didi and the eSports team NRG). He’s even made savvy moves with his own real estate, selling his Miami Beach mansion for $30 million in 2013 (double what he paid) before building his dream home in Coral Gables.

His real-life investing expertise landed him a guest spot on ABC’s Shark Tank in 2017, becoming the show’s first Hispanic shark. This year he’s displaying his coaching skills on CNBC’s Michael Strahan-produced Back in the Game, in which Rodriguez creates a financial plan for Joe Smith, a former No. 1 NBA draft pick who squandered career earnings of $61 million. Says Hoffman: “It’s an opportunity to educate, which is also at the core of Alex’s redemption story.”

For Rodriguez, the curriculum began at birth. His father, Victor, ran a shoe store in New York City before moving his clan to the baseball-obsessed Dominican Republic and then to Miami. “I’ve always had passion and a dream to be both mainly a baseball player and a businessman,” Rodriguez says. “That’s what my father was, and I wanted to be like him.”

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Deborah Frutos-Smith’s Journey at GSK

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GSK-Deborah-Frutos

Deborah Frutos-Smith is currently Senior Marketing Director for Global Recruitment at (GlaxoSmithKline) GSK. Deborah started her career as a Management Associate in GSK’s Management Development Program. Following completion of the program, she assumed the role of Senior Financial Analyst for US Pharmaceuticals.

Later, she became Manager for Specialty Products with responsibility for identifying and evaluating business development opportunities for late stage products. She continued her development when she became Senior Manager for Strategic Planning & Chief of Staff to the President of US Pharmaceuticals. In this capacity, she was responsible for merger alignment efforts between SmithKline Beecham and GlaxoWellcome.

When she was appointed Director of Planning & Project Management, she was tasked with developing and maintaining systems for financial monitoring and reporting of integration synergies post merger. During her career journey at GSK, Deborah was also assigned to the role of Director of GSK Branding & Reputation accountable for identifying opportunities to shape the business environment to support GSK’s commercial strategy. She then was appointed Sr. Director for the State Advocacy & Alliance Development team, where she helped support GSK’s policy efforts by developing identifying opportunities to align with nonprofit organizations to advance healthcare legislation on behalf of patients.

Deborah has an MBA with a major in marketing from Temple University and a Bachelor of Science in Business & Administration with a major in finance from Drexel University. Her favorite pastime is kicking the soccer ball or playing baseball with playing baseball with her two children, Liam, 11, and Aidan, 9.

Sell Yourself and Your Brand

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Creating a personal brand helps employers see your uniqueness

Why take the time to develop a personal brand? See how you can stand out to employers.

  • In a tough job market, you need to stand out. Besides helping you identify your personal strengths, having a brand can pull your resume to the top of the pile, make you shine in interviews, and leave your LinkedIn readers positively wowed.
  • Corporations take great care to develop a brand that defines their product. Brands help inspire trust and commitment in consumers; if you apply similar thinking to your personal brand, you can distinguish your value in a way that inspires an employer’s interest in you.
  • With so many marketing options, you need to be consistent. Use your brand in all your job search communications, including your cover letter, in interviews, and in thank-you notes. Your LinkedIn and other social media should clearly reflect you and your professional brand.
  • Most work is project based. Your brand is a shorthand description of what you bring to a team or to the table for projects.

So, are you ready to start thinking—or rethinking—your personal branding strategy?

Consider several of your best work experiences and how you contributed to them. What skill or characteristic is reflected in your best work stories? How did you use it? With what result? Ask yourself: “Why do people like to work with me or employ me?” What earns you compliments or accolades? What do people depend on you for?

Here are some examples to get you started:

  • Are you friendly and always the one to organize social events at work? Your brand could include “an inveterate team builder and initiator.”
  • Do you take unusual care to ensure details are thoroughly thought through and accurate? Your brand could be “willing to take on the precision that scares others away.”
  • You might be an outstanding supervisor who makes operations flow and brand yourself “a problem-solver who excels at developing talent.”

You can identify your signature characteristics yourself or work with a career coach or counselor to help you identify them. It’s a good idea to ask for some feedback on your ideas from a few trusted friends or colleagues before you go public with your brand to avoid a mismatch of how you see yourself and how you may come across to others.

Source: careeronestop.org

Casting Call Opportunity for Small Business Owners!

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Hispanic Business Owner

Vitamin Enriched, a real people casting company, is working with Chase to find small business owners who are Chase Ink customers. They are casting an exciting advertising campaign that will feature small business owners in their business locations.

They are specifically looking for businesses located in and around New York tri-state area, Los Angeles, Austin/Houston, Portland (Oregon), and New Orleans. The ideal businesses will have a brick and mortar or some other physical location. Those who are selected are paid $1,000 for a one day shoot at their business location.

Maybe you own a restaurant, are a farmer or an artisan. Maybe you’ve just opened a B&B, are an architect or design clothing. Whatever it is, they want to hear about how you are keeping your business successful and how you are using your Chase Ink card for your business.

Skype audition interviews: Late May – Auditions take about 20 minutes

Callback: Early June via video chat

Shoot: Shoot dates are taking place in July. If selected, it would be a one day shoot at your place of business.

For the complete details visit the website here

NOT A LALCC MEMBER YET?

About LALCC
Since 2009, the Los Angeles Latino Chamber of Commerce (LALCC) has advocated for and promoted the economic development of Greater Los Angeles’ Latino-owned businesses, which now number more than 300,000. The chamber’s economic development services include procurement, access to capital, certification, technical and other business assistance. Among other issues, its policy and advocacy efforts are focused on public and private minority procurement, community reinvestment and development, Latino public policy, international trade and small business funding. LALCC is a 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(6) nonprofit organization. For additional information about the chamber, visit lalcc.org.

USA Today’s New Publisher Is Gannett Veteran Maribel Wadsworth

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usa today publisher

USA Today has chosen one of its own to lead its highest ranks. Maribel Perez Wadsworth, a two-decade veteran of the company, will take the paper’s reins as its new publisher. Up until now, Wadsworth was president of the entire USA Today network, in addition to overseeing its content strategy. She’ll continue leading those efforts in her new role.

Wadsworth joins USA Today’s newly appointed editor-in-chief, Nicole Carroll, in a move that puts women in three of the company’s top leadership positions, including executive editor Patty Michalski. The new publisher says she plans to focus on expanding the outlet’s digital growth and doubling down on investigative and enterprise journalism. Wadsworth began her career as a beat reporter for the Rockford Register Star, a role she said is still very much part of her DNA. “Once a reporter, always a reporter,” she says.

Wadsworth’s background at the USA Today network included building digital products and helping the company’s innovation efforts. “We’ve grown our consumer revenues pretty significantly,” she says. She plans to continue that with her new role as publisher. USA Today, she says, has been experimenting with many different revenue models. It has a few audio projects–including serialized podcasts–on the horizon, as well other skirmishes in video, mobile, and membership.

EXPLORING NEW REVENUE MODELS

As I wrote a few months ago, membership and subscriptions have resurfaced as a promising revenue engine for the journalism business. Companies like the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Financial Times have shifted resources toward these offerings as a way to offset declines in advertising revenue. Wadsworth, too, is looking into this option. “We’re beginning to develop our plans for digital subscription models,” she tells me.

Many media companies have also been beleaguered by recent changes to Facebook’s algorithm, which have resulted in traffic declines. For Wadsworth, this predicament underscores a common strategic pitfall in which outlets come to rely too heavily on a single distribution channel. “We try very hard to not think or be driven by platforms specifically,” she says. “We want to make sure that what we’re doing is following our audience.

Another program Wadsworth finds promising is the ad-free option on USA Today’s app–as well as its push into franchised media programs. The newspaper’s video channel, Humankind, “has grown really nicely, to over a billion video video streams last year,” she says. Which is all to say that she believes that the national newspaper is building a stronger, less platform-dependent business model.

“We’re doing more and more experimentation,” she says.

Gannett, USA Today’s parent company, has been feeling squeezed by the pressures of the industry. Over the last few years, the company has reported sinking revenues as the print advertising market continues to plummet. “There’s no question that revenues overall have been under pressure over the last many years,” says Wadsworth. “At the same time,” she adds, “we’ve had a clear focus on revenue diversification.”

Read the complete article on Fast Company.

Three traits you need to get hired at Google, Amazon and other top companies

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Group of Tech Employees

Every year, LinkedIn measures the activity of its more than 500 million users to get insight on the companies in the U.S. people most want to work for.

This year, employers in tech, media and finance dominate the list, with Amazon taking the top spot. But to land a job at companies like Netflix, Google, or Amazon — which received 5,000,000 resumes for roughly 12,000 open jobs last year alone — bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch warns that it will take more than skills and experience.

“Earning a spot at one of these companies,” Welch tells CNBC Make It, “is like winning the lottery.”

To stand out from the competition, Welch says you’ll need a sterling resume — and these three traits:

1. Passion for the company’s mission
Welch says that in order to score a job at one of LinkedIn’s top companies, you must show in your interview that you understand and believe in the company’s mission and values.

“Your interview has to prove you have deep familiarity with the company’s heart and soul, its past and future,” she says. “And you need to make it clear that you are mission-driven.”

Show hiring managers that you don’t “work to live,” but, instead, that you “live to work, in particular, for a company with a purpose.”

2. Intensity
If you’re a laid back person, Welch says working for one of today’s leading companies may not be for you. Recruiters, she says, are looking for people “with intensity to spare.”

“Tesla is a company where, ‘excellence is a passing grade,'” she says. “Facebook wants its people to ‘be bold and move fast.'”

Welch says top employers want confident candidates full of ideas and energy.

“Bring your A-game to your interview,” she says, “as in, Type-A.”

3. Humanity
Yes, most top employers are looking for candidates with industry experience, but to really stand out, Welch says you’ll also need to demonstrate love for your customers, colleagues and employees.

“Top companies use their interviews to look for empathy, kindness, collegiality and authenticity,” she says. “They want to see your humanity, with a capital ‘H.'”

Getting a job at one of the most sought-after companies in America is no easy feat, but Welch says that if you show the right balance of skills and personality, you’ll have a pretty good chance of scoring a position “not only at the Amazons and Googles of the world, but just about anywhere you’d care to work.”

Read the complete article and more from Yahoo here.

The great Goya family

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Since its humble beginnings in 1936, Goya Foods has expanded worldwide while keeping family values at its core.

Whether as a small store in lower Manhattan or as an international company with more than 4,000 employees, Goya Foods has always kept family values at heart. In fact, the Unanue family refers to their employees, surrounding communities, customers, suppliers, and business partners as “la gran familia Goya,” or “the great Goya family,” said Bob Unanue, the company’s president and CEO. “We are the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States and the premier source for authentic Latin cuisine, but we are not just a food company,” he said. “We have become a part of families and tables across the world. We have a tremendous sense of responsibility to our society ‘family,’ and as we have grown, our commitment to family grows even stronger.” Toby Babeuf, regional vice president for Wells Fargo in Summit, New Jersey, said, “When you visit Goya, you’re humbled by the magnitude of its international operations and family-oriented management style.”

From humble beginnings to a worldwide expansion

The family has grown quite a bit over its 81-year history. Unanue’s grandparents, Prudencio Unanue and his wife Carolina, started the company in 1936 as a small shop on Duane Street in Manhattan. Today, Goya Foods has 26 corporate, manufacturing, and production facilities in the U.S., Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Spain. The company employs more than 4,000 people worldwide and manufactures and distributes more than 2,500 products.

“The history and story of Goya is as much about the importance of family and values as it is about achieving the American dream and helping to cultivate the Latin culture in the United States,” Unanue said.

Over the years, Goya Foods has relocated from its original storefront in New York City to its current, newly constructed headquarters in Jersey City, New Jersey. In recent years, Goya has also expanded its manufacturing and distribution centers in Texas, California, and Georgia.

And while Goya Foods has undergone many changes and expansions over the years, it has remained a Wells Fargo customer for 40 years.

“Wells Fargo has supported Goya’s growth and expansion with financing and treasury services to support our evolving business requirements and opportunities,” Unanue said. “Our banking service providers from Wells Fargo have always been proactive in offering and delivering services to support Goya’s needs. They have demonstrated an interest in understanding our business and delivering quality service and advice.”

As the company looks ahead to the future, Unanue said, Goya Foods is looking for opportunities in new and evolving distribution channels and growth through acquisition, joint ventures, and alliances.

Continue onto Wells Fargo to read more about the Goya Family.

What to wear to work

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Work Attire Tips

For six months, Edward Rangel excelled as a waiter at a Red Robin in Bellevue, Washington. Customers and supervisors might occasionally notice the small religious inscriptions he had tattooed around his wrists, but no one complained about them, and they didn’t interfere with his duties serving food.

Then a new manager started at the franchise. Displeased by the tattoos, the boss told Rangel to conceal the ink, citing company policy. Rangel explained his belief that covering the tattoos violated his Kemetic faith and asked the company to accomodate his religion. Management refused to make an exception on the grounds that changing its dress code policy would undermine its “wholesome image.” So Rangel was fired.

That’s when the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission stepped in, filing a suit to defend Rangel’s right to an accomodation. Red Robin eventually agreed to settle the case, paying Rangel $150,000 and making policy changes to protect the rights of other employees.

Choosing work attire poses a perennial puzzle. Companies often have both explicit dress code policies and unspoken rules about the unofficial office dress code, but as Rangel’s story demonstrates, those rules can’t infringe on workers’ rights. And just because an outfit is allowed at the office doesn’t necessarily mean it will make a good impression on your boss or clients.

What’s legal at work?

Companies are legally allowed to implement and enforce a dress code as long as it is reasonable and tied to a legitimate business purpose, says J.J. Conway, an attorney who specializes in employment law.

What’s appropriate for the office?

Choosing appropriate work attire depends on your industry, company and specific job function. The key consideration? “Dressing for your audience,” says Jacqueline Whitmore, etiquette expert and founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach.

People who work in creative fields, like media, advertising, entertainment or cosmetology, may have more freedom to express their personalities in their clothing, Whitmore says. In those careers, bright colors, funky accessories and innovative hairstyles may be acceptable or even expected.

Conversely, employees in conservative fields like wealth management or a government agency often must dress more formally, sometimes in suits.

No matter your general industry, your company will likely have written or unwritten corporate culture rules for what to wear to work. Figuring out what’s acceptable may take research and a bit of inference. When you first go into an office for a job interview, make sure to look at what your interviewer and the other employees are wearing and take mental notes.

After you’re hired, if your workplace lacks a written dress code policy, or if you want more clarification, it’s best simply to inquire with the human resources department, says Edward Yost, manager of employee relations and development at the Society for Human Resource Management.

“Ask the questions rather than blindly roll the dice and send the wrong message,” he says.

Even if your company has a general set of guidelines, what you should wear depends on your particular job responsibilities. People who work in customer service jobs, for example, should dress for the comfort of their clients and in ways that project competence, Whitmore says.

Regardless of the particulars of your company dress code or office culture, office clothes should fit well, be clean and cover what children call “private parts.”

“Presentation is the most important,” says Bridgette Raes, personal stylist and author. “No matter what you’re wearing, make sure it’s in good shape, well cared for and you look groomed.”

What is business casual attire?

Many office environments call for business professional or business casual attire. That typically means slacks, khaki pants or modest skirts or dresses; cardigans, blouses or button-down collared shirts; and closed-toe dress shoes. Raes suggests putting thought into work bags, too: “Don’t take the same grubby backpack you carried all over your college campus.”

In terms of what not to wear, it’s important not to distract others with your outfits, Raes says. “You want to make sure you’re standing out for the right reasons,” not because your clothes call attention to you, she explains.

There are two universal “don’ts” for how to dress business casual: no shorts and no flip flops. Beyond that, Raes advises against casual sandals, sweatshirts, any type of “athleisure” wear and clothing that is distressed or ripped. Outfits that are too revealing are not appropriate for the office.

Dress for the job you want

It may sound trite, but experts agree that you should dress for the job you want, not the job you have. Taking clothing cues from your boss could help you attain his or her position in the future.

You never want your manager to question your professional capabilities because of your outfits. Supervisors sometimes have to “fight the stereotype or that silent judgment that’s been formulated” because of what a worker wears, Yost says. “People who don’t work with the individual on a day-to-day basis may see the tattoos, piercings, vintage clothing that’s not your standard business casual, and when they’re up for a promotion, the question will come: ‘How serious are they?'”

This also means to think carefully about what to wear to an interview. It’s important to dress to impress when you’re hoping to get hired, so even if the company usually follows a business casual dress code, consider donning formal business attire. For example, after a period of job seeking, one of Raes’ clients changed the outfit she wore during interviews and saw immediate results: She received three job offers in one week.

The lesson? “When we change how we present ourselves, we send our message more effectively,” Raes says.

What happens if you violate the dress code?

If you had to wear a uniform in school, you’re probably familiar with the impulse to disobey the dress code. And although your boss probably won’t make you stand up in front of your co-workers while she measures the length of your hem, employers may take punitive action against workers who repeatedly violate the office dress code.

There’s usually a “progressive discipline process,” Yost says, meaning that a manager or HR representative may treat a first-time violation as a learning opportunity: “We’re not going to send you home today, but going forward, we would prefer you not wear jeans with rips and holes in them.”

If someone continually flouts the rules, an employer might send him or her home and dock pay. And if the problem continues, the employee may be fired.

What’s appropriate for the office gym?

Office gyms are popular perks, but they are also landmine fields when it comes to clothing. Employees who work out at the company gym should remember that they’ll likely run into their co-workers while putting in miles on the treadmill or lifting weights. Avoid wearing T-shirts with offensive slogans or outfits that are excessively revealing, Raes recommends: “You’re still in the workplace; this is not personal time.”

What’s appropriate for the office holiday party?

Similarly, treat your office holiday party as a work experience that requires appropriate dress. Your boss will take note if you wear anything too revealing or silly.

“You want to continue to send a professional and positive message,” Yost says. “People make silent judgments all the time. They’re not going to come up and tell you, ‘That tie you wore was stupid and I lost a lot of respect for you,’ but it still may be happening in their minds.”

On Halloween, if your workplace permits employees to wear costumes, keep yours reasonable.

What about tattoos and piercings?

Attitudes toward tattoos in the workplace and piercings in the workplace have changed in the past few decades, but not every employer will be happy to see them, Yost says.

“[Tattoos] are generally more accepted than they would have been 10 or 15 years ago,” he says. “However, there are going to be some ‘family-run’ environments, or ‘family-friendly’ environments who may be a little more rigid: ‘Sure you can have your tattoos, but we’re going to ask you to keep them covered while at work.'”

If you’re wondering how to cover up tattoos for work, Yost recommends long-sleeved shirts, strategically placed Band-Aids or applying foundation makeup that’s the same color as your skin tone.

Continue on to money.usnews.com/money/careers to read the complete article.