Three traits you need to get hired at Google, Amazon and other top companies

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Group of Tech Employees

Every year, LinkedIn measures the activity of its more than 500 million users to get insight on the companies in the U.S. people most want to work for.

This year, employers in tech, media and finance dominate the list, with Amazon taking the top spot. But to land a job at companies like Netflix, Google, or Amazon — which received 5,000,000 resumes for roughly 12,000 open jobs last year alone — bestselling management author and CNBC contributor Suzy Welch warns that it will take more than skills and experience.

“Earning a spot at one of these companies,” Welch tells CNBC Make It, “is like winning the lottery.”

To stand out from the competition, Welch says you’ll need a sterling resume — and these three traits:

1. Passion for the company’s mission
Welch says that in order to score a job at one of LinkedIn’s top companies, you must show in your interview that you understand and believe in the company’s mission and values.

“Your interview has to prove you have deep familiarity with the company’s heart and soul, its past and future,” she says. “And you need to make it clear that you are mission-driven.”

Show hiring managers that you don’t “work to live,” but, instead, that you “live to work, in particular, for a company with a purpose.”

2. Intensity
If you’re a laid back person, Welch says working for one of today’s leading companies may not be for you. Recruiters, she says, are looking for people “with intensity to spare.”

“Tesla is a company where, ‘excellence is a passing grade,'” she says. “Facebook wants its people to ‘be bold and move fast.'”

Welch says top employers want confident candidates full of ideas and energy.

“Bring your A-game to your interview,” she says, “as in, Type-A.”

3. Humanity
Yes, most top employers are looking for candidates with industry experience, but to really stand out, Welch says you’ll also need to demonstrate love for your customers, colleagues and employees.

“Top companies use their interviews to look for empathy, kindness, collegiality and authenticity,” she says. “They want to see your humanity, with a capital ‘H.'”

Getting a job at one of the most sought-after companies in America is no easy feat, but Welch says that if you show the right balance of skills and personality, you’ll have a pretty good chance of scoring a position “not only at the Amazons and Googles of the world, but just about anywhere you’d care to work.”

Read the complete article and more from Yahoo here.

María Celeste Arrarás Joins Las Vegas Walk Of Stars

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Maria Celeste

MIAMI – April 19, 2018 – The host of Telemundo’s “Al Rojo Vivo” news magazine, María Celeste Arrarás, will soon add her name to the Las Vegas Walk of Stars. She is the first person born in Puerto Rico to receive this honor, held by a select group of superstars such as Juan Gabriel, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, Luis Miguel, Vicente Fernández and Jenni Rivera.

María Celeste’s star will be unveiled in a special ceremony on Tuesday, April 24, and installed in its permanent sidewalk home for public viewing the following day, Wednesday, April 25.

“I owe this star to each and every one of the individuals who have stood alongside me during my career, and especially to the viewers who accompany me from home every day,” María Celeste acknowledged.

Emmy-award winning journalist and investigative reporter María Celeste Arrarás is one of the best-known figures in Spanish-speaking television.  The lead anchor of “Al Rojo Vivo con María Celeste,” one of the most acclaimed news magazines on Hispanic television, she has also served as guest anchor of “Noticias Telemundo” and NBC’s “Today Show,” and as a contributor to “Dateline” and “NBC Nightly News.”  She has appeared on the cover of People en Español more than 14 times and graced the front of Newsweek’s special issue on “Women and Leadership: The Next Generation.”  She has been profiled in numerous prestigious publications, among them The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Washington Post and The Miami Herald.

María Celeste began her television career as a local reporter for Puerto Rico’s Canal 24 in 1986.  She was hired by Telemundo’s New York affiliate and in 1994 went on to work for “Primer Impacto” on Univision, rejoining Telemundo as anchor of “Al Rojo Vivo” in 2002.

Her career is distinguished by a number of prestigious awards, including three Emmys™ and the Rubén Salazar Award for Excellence in Journalism.

About NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises:

NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises is a world-class media company leading the industry in the production and distribution of high-quality Spanish-language content to U.S. Hispanics and audiences around the world. This fast-growing multiplatform portfolio is comprised of the Telemundo Network and Station Group, Telemundo Deportes, Telemundo Global Studios, Universo, and a Digital Enterprises & Emerging Business unit. Telemundo Network features original Spanish-language entertainment, news and sports content reaching 94% of U.S. Hispanic TV households in 210 markets through 27 local stations, 51 affiliates and its national feed. Telemundo also owns WKAQ, a television station that serves viewers in Puerto Rico.

Telemundo Deportes is the designated Spanish-language home of two of the world’s most popular sporting events: FIFA World Cup™ through 2026 and the Summer Olympic Games through 2032. Telemundo Global Studios is the company’s domestic and international scripted production unit including Telemundo Studios, Telemundo International Studios, Telemundo International, as well as all of the company’s co-production partnerships.  As the #1 media company reaching Hispanics and millennials online, the Digital Enterprises & Emerging Business unit distributes original content across multiple platforms, maximizing its exclusive partnerships with properties such as BuzzFeed, Vox, and Snapchat. Through Telemundo Internacional, the largest U.S.-based distributor of Spanish-language content in the world; and Universo, the fastest growing Hispanic entertainment cable network, the company reflects the diverse lifestyle, cultural experience and language of its expanding audience. NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises is a division of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast Corporation.

Sell Yourself and Your Brand

LinkedIn

Creating a personal brand helps employers see your uniqueness

Why take the time to develop a personal brand? See how you can stand out to employers.

  • In a tough job market, you need to stand out. Besides helping you identify your personal strengths, having a brand can pull your resume to the top of the pile, make you shine in interviews, and leave your LinkedIn readers positively wowed.
  • Corporations take great care to develop a brand that defines their product. Brands help inspire trust and commitment in consumers; if you apply similar thinking to your personal brand, you can distinguish your value in a way that inspires an employer’s interest in you.
  • With so many marketing options, you need to be consistent. Use your brand in all your job search communications, including your cover letter, in interviews, and in thank-you notes. Your LinkedIn and other social media should clearly reflect you and your professional brand.
  • Most work is project based. Your brand is a shorthand description of what you bring to a team or to the table for projects.

So, are you ready to start thinking—or rethinking—your personal branding strategy?

Consider several of your best work experiences and how you contributed to them. What skill or characteristic is reflected in your best work stories? How did you use it? With what result? Ask yourself: “Why do people like to work with me or employ me?” What earns you compliments or accolades? What do people depend on you for?

Here are some examples to get you started:

  • Are you friendly and always the one to organize social events at work? Your brand could include “an inveterate team builder and initiator.”
  • Do you take unusual care to ensure details are thoroughly thought through and accurate? Your brand could be “willing to take on the precision that scares others away.”
  • You might be an outstanding supervisor who makes operations flow and brand yourself “a problem-solver who excels at developing talent.”

You can identify your signature characteristics yourself or work with a career coach or counselor to help you identify them. It’s a good idea to ask for some feedback on your ideas from a few trusted friends or colleagues before you go public with your brand to avoid a mismatch of how you see yourself and how you may come across to others.

Source: careeronestop.org

Casting Call Opportunity for Small Business Owners!

LinkedIn
Hispanic Business Owner

Vitamin Enriched, a real people casting company, is working with Chase to find small business owners who are Chase Ink customers. They are casting an exciting advertising campaign that will feature small business owners in their business locations.

They are specifically looking for businesses located in and around New York tri-state area, Los Angeles, Austin/Houston, Portland (Oregon), and New Orleans. The ideal businesses will have a brick and mortar or some other physical location. Those who are selected are paid $1,000 for a one day shoot at their business location.

Maybe you own a restaurant, are a farmer or an artisan. Maybe you’ve just opened a B&B, are an architect or design clothing. Whatever it is, they want to hear about how you are keeping your business successful and how you are using your Chase Ink card for your business.

Skype audition interviews: Late May – Auditions take about 20 minutes

Callback: Early June via video chat

Shoot: Shoot dates are taking place in July. If selected, it would be a one day shoot at your place of business.

For the complete details visit the website here

NOT A LALCC MEMBER YET?

About LALCC
Since 2009, the Los Angeles Latino Chamber of Commerce (LALCC) has advocated for and promoted the economic development of Greater Los Angeles’ Latino-owned businesses, which now number more than 300,000. The chamber’s economic development services include procurement, access to capital, certification, technical and other business assistance. Among other issues, its policy and advocacy efforts are focused on public and private minority procurement, community reinvestment and development, Latino public policy, international trade and small business funding. LALCC is a 501(c)(3) and 501(c)(6) nonprofit organization. For additional information about the chamber, visit lalcc.org.

USA Today’s New Publisher Is Gannett Veteran Maribel Wadsworth

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usa today publisher

USA Today has chosen one of its own to lead its highest ranks. Maribel Perez Wadsworth, a two-decade veteran of the company, will take the paper’s reins as its new publisher. Up until now, Wadsworth was president of the entire USA Today network, in addition to overseeing its content strategy. She’ll continue leading those efforts in her new role.

Wadsworth joins USA Today’s newly appointed editor-in-chief, Nicole Carroll, in a move that puts women in three of the company’s top leadership positions, including executive editor Patty Michalski. The new publisher says she plans to focus on expanding the outlet’s digital growth and doubling down on investigative and enterprise journalism. Wadsworth began her career as a beat reporter for the Rockford Register Star, a role she said is still very much part of her DNA. “Once a reporter, always a reporter,” she says.

Wadsworth’s background at the USA Today network included building digital products and helping the company’s innovation efforts. “We’ve grown our consumer revenues pretty significantly,” she says. She plans to continue that with her new role as publisher. USA Today, she says, has been experimenting with many different revenue models. It has a few audio projects–including serialized podcasts–on the horizon, as well other skirmishes in video, mobile, and membership.

EXPLORING NEW REVENUE MODELS

As I wrote a few months ago, membership and subscriptions have resurfaced as a promising revenue engine for the journalism business. Companies like the Washington Post, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and the Financial Times have shifted resources toward these offerings as a way to offset declines in advertising revenue. Wadsworth, too, is looking into this option. “We’re beginning to develop our plans for digital subscription models,” she tells me.

Many media companies have also been beleaguered by recent changes to Facebook’s algorithm, which have resulted in traffic declines. For Wadsworth, this predicament underscores a common strategic pitfall in which outlets come to rely too heavily on a single distribution channel. “We try very hard to not think or be driven by platforms specifically,” she says. “We want to make sure that what we’re doing is following our audience.

Another program Wadsworth finds promising is the ad-free option on USA Today’s app–as well as its push into franchised media programs. The newspaper’s video channel, Humankind, “has grown really nicely, to over a billion video video streams last year,” she says. Which is all to say that she believes that the national newspaper is building a stronger, less platform-dependent business model.

“We’re doing more and more experimentation,” she says.

Gannett, USA Today’s parent company, has been feeling squeezed by the pressures of the industry. Over the last few years, the company has reported sinking revenues as the print advertising market continues to plummet. “There’s no question that revenues overall have been under pressure over the last many years,” says Wadsworth. “At the same time,” she adds, “we’ve had a clear focus on revenue diversification.”

Read the complete article on Fast Company.

12 Surprising Interview Tips

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Interview Tips

You’re almost there. Your resume landed you an interview and now it’s time to seal the deal. So what’s the best way to prepare?

To find the answer, I looked back on my interviews, sifted through research, and most importantly, asked employees from today’s most coveted companies. I tried to find deep insights beyond the typical “sit up straight!” and “dress to impress!” tips we hear too much.

Below you’ll find the 12 best tips to help before, during and after your interview.

BEFORE

 1.    Research Earnings Calls, Quarterly Reports & Blog Posts

In today’s world, content is king. Goldman Sachs publishes quarterly reports, Microsoft records its earning calls, and every startup has a blog.

With so much out there, I’m baffled that few of us look past the company’s homepage. It’s like we’re writing an essay on The Odyssey without quoting a single passage from the book.

Example: If you’re interviewing with Google, here’s two ways to answer: “What’s Google’s biggest opportunity in the next 5 years?”

  • Weak: “I think wearable technology will be big because Google Glass and Apple Watch represent a new trend that shows…”
  • Strong: “Call me geeky, but I was listening to Google’s quarterly earnings call and was blown away by the fact that display advertising hit over $5 billion in the past few years. Therefore, I think that…”

Neither answer is wrong, but the latter says much more. It shows you’ve done your homework and give answers rooted in data.

2.   Use Google Alerts

Keeping up with company news is hard, especially if you’re interviewing with multiple places at once. That’s why Google Alerts is a savior; it’s a tool that emails you anytime a new story appears for a specific term. That way, you learn about current events without searching for them.

 Example: If you’re applying to Creative Artists Agency, follow these steps:

  1. Go to www.google.com/alerts
  2. Type in “Creative Artists Agency”
  3. Put in your email address if you’re not already logged in to Gmail

Soon enough, you’ll get updates on CAA and have more ammo for your interview.

3. Use Social Sweepster To Clean Your Facebook & Twitter

Nowadays, 91% of employers search your social media for any red flags. While most people tell you to watch every single thing you upload, there’s a much easier solution. Use Social Sweepster, an app that detects pictures of red solo cups, beer bottles, and other “suspicious” objects. It even detects profanity from your past posts! Now, that’s f%$king awesome!

“Too many recruiters reject candidate because of something they found on their social platforms” Social Sweepster CEO Tom McGrath says. “We help you create the first impression on your own terms.”

4. Schedule For Tuesday at 10:30 AM

According to Glassdoor, the best time to interview is 10:30 AM on Tuesday. Remember, your interviewer has a world of responsibilities beyond hiring. They’re responding to emails, balancing projects, and meeting tons of other candidates so it’s crucial to consider when they’ll be in the best mental state to meet you.

10:30 AM Tuesday is the sweet spot because you:

  • Avoid the bookends. On Mondays and Fridays, employees gear up for the week or wind down. By the same token, avoid the first or last slots of any workday.
  • Avoid lunchtime. Immediately before noon, your interviewer may be too hungry to concentrate; immediately after, they may be in a food coma.

But there’s a caveat. Research shows it’s best to take the earliest interview slot “in circumstances under which decisions must be made quickly or without much deliberation because preferences are unconsciously and immediately guided to those options presented first.”

Bottom line: if the firm is hiring for a job starting in a few months, try to interview late morning between Tuesday through Thursday. If the firm is hiring immediately, grab the earliest slot.

5. Craft Your “Story Statement”

 Though most interviews start with the same prompt (“tell me about yourself” or “walk me through your resume”), we blow it off with boring answers like:

I studied [major X] because I really care about making a difference in [industry Y] as you can see through my last job at [company Z]…

This answer is like tearing out the first 200 pages of your autobiography. You leave out everything that gives meaning to why you want this job in the first place. What was your moment of epiphany? How did your childhood influence you? Why does this job move you? Most people don’t answer these questions. They start and end with their professional experience, leaving little to inspire the interviewer.

Next time, use what I call a “Story Statement,” which is a Cliff Notes of your autobiography.

Example: Here’s an amazing Story Statement that Teach For America fellow Kareli Lizarraga used for her interviews.

“I grew up in California and Arizona after immigrating to the United States when I was four years old. Since neither of my parents went to college, I relied on my high school teachers to help me apply to top universities. With their support, I was able to attend the University of Pennsylvania. Then I spent a summer at a Washington DC law firm, which represented low-income students and helped me realize that my passion lay within creating educational opportunities for all.

I decided to become a teacher because I see myself so deeply reflected in the stories of so many students in your schools – and that’s why I’m so excited about the opportunity to interview with you today. Like my teachers did for me, I want to impact the next generation of students by supporting them and understanding the experiences they’re facing.”

A Story Statement shows that you’re a person, not just a professional.  It also makes it easy for your interviewer to predict the next chapter of your story. For Kareli, Teach For America is a logical next step. Of course, if she interviewed for Apple, she may change her Story Statement to include an early experience with her first computer and talk about how her passion for tech grew from there. For a Bain interview, she could mention how she started problem solving at a young age and now wants to do it on a big scale.

Chances are, we’ve all had experiences we can connect to where we’re trying to go. It’s just a matter of selecting the right ones to tell our story. That said, if you struggle to craft your Story Statement for a particular interview, you might be applying for the wrong job.

6. Wear a Subtle Fashion Statement

We already know dressing well makes a difference. But what if we took our attention to detail a step further? That’s exactly what Morgan Stanley analyst Julio German Arias Castillo did for his interviews.

“Wear something that represents your culture or background,” he says. “In my case, I always wear a pin of the Panamanian flag on my suit lapel. Most of my interviewers ask about it so it becomes a chance to discuss my upbringing and love of my homeland.”

Julio created a conversation starter with his clothing. Depending on the company, you can be more playful: wear a bracelet from your recent travels to India, a tie with a quirky pattern, or — if you can pull it off — a small mockingjay pin if you’re a Hunger Games fan. As long as it’s subtle and tasteful, your fashion statement can build rapport through fun conversations about your hometown or mutual love for Katniss Everdeen.

Continue on to Forbes.com to read tips 7-12 and more great career/business articles

The great Goya family

LinkedIn

Since its humble beginnings in 1936, Goya Foods has expanded worldwide while keeping family values at its core.

Whether as a small store in lower Manhattan or as an international company with more than 4,000 employees, Goya Foods has always kept family values at heart. In fact, the Unanue family refers to their employees, surrounding communities, customers, suppliers, and business partners as “la gran familia Goya,” or “the great Goya family,” said Bob Unanue, the company’s president and CEO. “We are the largest Hispanic-owned food company in the United States and the premier source for authentic Latin cuisine, but we are not just a food company,” he said. “We have become a part of families and tables across the world. We have a tremendous sense of responsibility to our society ‘family,’ and as we have grown, our commitment to family grows even stronger.” Toby Babeuf, regional vice president for Wells Fargo in Summit, New Jersey, said, “When you visit Goya, you’re humbled by the magnitude of its international operations and family-oriented management style.”

From humble beginnings to a worldwide expansion

The family has grown quite a bit over its 81-year history. Unanue’s grandparents, Prudencio Unanue and his wife Carolina, started the company in 1936 as a small shop on Duane Street in Manhattan. Today, Goya Foods has 26 corporate, manufacturing, and production facilities in the U.S., Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic, and Spain. The company employs more than 4,000 people worldwide and manufactures and distributes more than 2,500 products.

“The history and story of Goya is as much about the importance of family and values as it is about achieving the American dream and helping to cultivate the Latin culture in the United States,” Unanue said.

Over the years, Goya Foods has relocated from its original storefront in New York City to its current, newly constructed headquarters in Jersey City, New Jersey. In recent years, Goya has also expanded its manufacturing and distribution centers in Texas, California, and Georgia.

And while Goya Foods has undergone many changes and expansions over the years, it has remained a Wells Fargo customer for 40 years.

“Wells Fargo has supported Goya’s growth and expansion with financing and treasury services to support our evolving business requirements and opportunities,” Unanue said. “Our banking service providers from Wells Fargo have always been proactive in offering and delivering services to support Goya’s needs. They have demonstrated an interest in understanding our business and delivering quality service and advice.”

As the company looks ahead to the future, Unanue said, Goya Foods is looking for opportunities in new and evolving distribution channels and growth through acquisition, joint ventures, and alliances.

Continue onto Wells Fargo to read more about the Goya Family.

Latinas on the Rise

LinkedIn
Ana Bermudez

The number of Latinas in powerful positions is rising every day. This fast-growing segment of the population is showing how tech savvy they’ve become, how they can handle any job, and how hard they are working to increase opportunities for others. The women here hold positions that have not historically been held by Latinas, yet they are rising to the top of their fields.

Ana Bermudez, TAGit™ CEO

Ana Bermudez, pictured left, is the CEO of TAGit™, the mobile app that TV viewers use to buy items from their favorite TV shows. TAGit is a tech platform where TV, entertainment, retail, and commerce converge to monetize media, ads, and product placement.

Founded in 2013, TAGit is leading the way in monetizing media with the patent-pending tech solution it created. Through its platform, TAGit offers access to a robust portfolio of retailers, including Target. TAGit has won numerous awards from various tech and diversity organizations and was selected to participate in the first group of the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, and the first group of the NMSDC Emerging Young Entrepreneurs Program.

Ana is a proud Fighting Irish, and holds a bachelor’s degree in Finance from the Mendoza College of Business at the University of Notre Dame. She is passionate about serving her community, promoting STEM and higher education in under-served and under-represented communities.

Ana recently served as Chairman of the Stanford Latino Entrepreneur Leadership Program Alumni Council, and as an Advisor of the University of Notre Dame Council–Institute for Latino Studies.

Source: TAGit

Ilia Calderón, co-anchor on Noticiero Univision

Ilia Calderon-Latina on the Rise
(Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)

Univision News, the award-winning news division of Univision Communications Inc. (UCI), the leading media company serving Hispanic America, has designated Ilia Calderón as the new co-anchor of Univision Network’s flagship evening newscast, Noticiero Univision. She also serves as co-host of Univision’s primetime newsmagazine, Here and Now.

Calderón is the first Afro-Latina to anchor an evening newscast for a major broadcast network in the United States. She had formerly achieved a similar milestone in her native Colombia, where she was the first black woman to ever host a national news program in that country, CMI News.

With a distinguished 20+-year career in broadcast journalism, Calderón has received many prestigious recognitions, including an Emmy award. She is known across Latin America and the U.S. for her direct journalistic style, thorough coverage of major news events, and incisive interviews with global celebrities and political leaders.

Born to a bi-racial and culturally diverse family in the Chocó region of Colombia, Calderón launched her journalism career in 1994 as the anchor of a local newscast in the country’s second largest city, Medellín. She is now based in Miami.

Source: corporate.univision.com

Claudia Romo Edelman-Latina on the RiseClaudia Romo Edelman, Rainbow PUSH Coalition award recipient

Claudia Romo Edelman, Special Adviser for UNICEF and Hispanicize 2018 co-chair, was the recipient of the Rainbow PUSH Coalition 2017 Rising Hispanic Leadership Award.

“Claudia is a firm believer in the power of uniting the Latino community and is somebody whose track record and skills are needed to lead Latinos forward,” said Rev. Jesse L. Jackson, Sr. “She has the passion to be that unifying leader the Hispanic community needs.”

Romo Edelman is the Special Adviser to UNICEF, having served as the Global Chief of Public Advocacy at UNICEF since 2014. Romo Edelman is also co-chair of Hispanicize 2018, the national event for Latino trendsetters and newsmakers that will launch a study of Latino diversity in Silicon Valley in 2017.

Romo Edelman, a former Mexican-Swiss diplomat, previously managed communications and advocacy for the Special Adviser for the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and Climate Change in the Executive Office of the Secretary General of the United Nations. Romo Edelman has led PR, brand and marketing for some of the world’s biggest global organizations including the World Economic Forum, the UN Refugee Agency and the Global Fund to fight AIDS, TB and Malaria.

Source: hispanicizewire.com

45 Pieces of Career Advice That Will Get You to the Top

LinkedIn

When it comes to your career, sometimes it feels like you could use all the advice you can get. From picking the “right” career to actually excelling in it, there’s certainly a lot to learn.

And that’s why we’ve gathered our all-time best career advice. From starting out at the bottom of the totem pole to advancing to a more senior position to—who knows?—maybe even branching out to open your own business, we’ve collected 45 of the best tips for whatever stage you’re at in your career.

Working a Not-Quite-Dream-Job

  1. The best career or job is the one in which you’re using the skills you enjoy. But, not every job needs to address all of your passions. Use every job as an opportunity to learn something new and keep an open mind; you may find that you really enjoy something you never imagined would appeal to you.—Miriam Salpeter, Founder of Keppie Careers
  2. Don’t take yourself (or your career) too seriously. Plenty of brilliant people started out in jobs they hated, or took paths that weren’t right at the beginning of their careers. Professional development is no longer linear, and trust that with hard work and a dedication to figuring out what you want to do with your life, you, too, will be OK!—Kathryn Minshew, CEO of The Muse
  3. Every person you meet is a potential door to a new opportunity—personally or professionally. Build good bridges even in that just-for-now job, because you never know how they’ll weave into the larger picture of your life.—Kristina LeonardiCareer Coach
  4. My friend Andre said to me, “You know, Marissa, you’re putting a lot of pressure on yourself to pick the right choice, and I’ve gotta be honest: That’s not what I see here. I see a bunch of good choices, and there’s the one that you pick and make great.” I think that’s one of the best pieces of advice I’ve ever gotten.”—Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!
  5. No matter how low on the totem poll you are or how jaded you’ve become by your to-do list, it’s still important to show up early, wear something sharp, and avoid Facebook like the plague. I discovered that when I acted like a professional, I suddenly felt like my work was a lot more valuable. “Looking the part” boosted my confidence, helped me begin to see myself as a highly capable contributor to the team—and ultimately led the rest of my team to see me in the same light.—Lisa Habersack, Writer
  6. Remember that a job, even a great job or a fantastic career, doesn’t give your life meaning, at least not by itself. Life is about what you learn, who you are or can become, who you love and are loved by.—Fran Dorf, Author and Psychotherapist
  7. If the career you have chosen has some unexpected inconvenience, console yourself by reflecting that no career is without them.—Jane Fonda

Continue onto The Muse to read the complete article.

What to wear to work

LinkedIn
Work Attire Tips

For six months, Edward Rangel excelled as a waiter at a Red Robin in Bellevue, Washington. Customers and supervisors might occasionally notice the small religious inscriptions he had tattooed around his wrists, but no one complained about them, and they didn’t interfere with his duties serving food.

Then a new manager started at the franchise. Displeased by the tattoos, the boss told Rangel to conceal the ink, citing company policy. Rangel explained his belief that covering the tattoos violated his Kemetic faith and asked the company to accomodate his religion. Management refused to make an exception on the grounds that changing its dress code policy would undermine its “wholesome image.” So Rangel was fired.

That’s when the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission stepped in, filing a suit to defend Rangel’s right to an accomodation. Red Robin eventually agreed to settle the case, paying Rangel $150,000 and making policy changes to protect the rights of other employees.

Choosing work attire poses a perennial puzzle. Companies often have both explicit dress code policies and unspoken rules about the unofficial office dress code, but as Rangel’s story demonstrates, those rules can’t infringe on workers’ rights. And just because an outfit is allowed at the office doesn’t necessarily mean it will make a good impression on your boss or clients.

What’s legal at work?

Companies are legally allowed to implement and enforce a dress code as long as it is reasonable and tied to a legitimate business purpose, says J.J. Conway, an attorney who specializes in employment law.

What’s appropriate for the office?

Choosing appropriate work attire depends on your industry, company and specific job function. The key consideration? “Dressing for your audience,” says Jacqueline Whitmore, etiquette expert and founder of The Protocol School of Palm Beach.

People who work in creative fields, like media, advertising, entertainment or cosmetology, may have more freedom to express their personalities in their clothing, Whitmore says. In those careers, bright colors, funky accessories and innovative hairstyles may be acceptable or even expected.

Conversely, employees in conservative fields like wealth management or a government agency often must dress more formally, sometimes in suits.

No matter your general industry, your company will likely have written or unwritten corporate culture rules for what to wear to work. Figuring out what’s acceptable may take research and a bit of inference. When you first go into an office for a job interview, make sure to look at what your interviewer and the other employees are wearing and take mental notes.

After you’re hired, if your workplace lacks a written dress code policy, or if you want more clarification, it’s best simply to inquire with the human resources department, says Edward Yost, manager of employee relations and development at the Society for Human Resource Management.

“Ask the questions rather than blindly roll the dice and send the wrong message,” he says.

Even if your company has a general set of guidelines, what you should wear depends on your particular job responsibilities. People who work in customer service jobs, for example, should dress for the comfort of their clients and in ways that project competence, Whitmore says.

Regardless of the particulars of your company dress code or office culture, office clothes should fit well, be clean and cover what children call “private parts.”

“Presentation is the most important,” says Bridgette Raes, personal stylist and author. “No matter what you’re wearing, make sure it’s in good shape, well cared for and you look groomed.”

What is business casual attire?

Many office environments call for business professional or business casual attire. That typically means slacks, khaki pants or modest skirts or dresses; cardigans, blouses or button-down collared shirts; and closed-toe dress shoes. Raes suggests putting thought into work bags, too: “Don’t take the same grubby backpack you carried all over your college campus.”

In terms of what not to wear, it’s important not to distract others with your outfits, Raes says. “You want to make sure you’re standing out for the right reasons,” not because your clothes call attention to you, she explains.

There are two universal “don’ts” for how to dress business casual: no shorts and no flip flops. Beyond that, Raes advises against casual sandals, sweatshirts, any type of “athleisure” wear and clothing that is distressed or ripped. Outfits that are too revealing are not appropriate for the office.

Dress for the job you want

It may sound trite, but experts agree that you should dress for the job you want, not the job you have. Taking clothing cues from your boss could help you attain his or her position in the future.

You never want your manager to question your professional capabilities because of your outfits. Supervisors sometimes have to “fight the stereotype or that silent judgment that’s been formulated” because of what a worker wears, Yost says. “People who don’t work with the individual on a day-to-day basis may see the tattoos, piercings, vintage clothing that’s not your standard business casual, and when they’re up for a promotion, the question will come: ‘How serious are they?'”

This also means to think carefully about what to wear to an interview. It’s important to dress to impress when you’re hoping to get hired, so even if the company usually follows a business casual dress code, consider donning formal business attire. For example, after a period of job seeking, one of Raes’ clients changed the outfit she wore during interviews and saw immediate results: She received three job offers in one week.

The lesson? “When we change how we present ourselves, we send our message more effectively,” Raes says.

What happens if you violate the dress code?

If you had to wear a uniform in school, you’re probably familiar with the impulse to disobey the dress code. And although your boss probably won’t make you stand up in front of your co-workers while she measures the length of your hem, employers may take punitive action against workers who repeatedly violate the office dress code.

There’s usually a “progressive discipline process,” Yost says, meaning that a manager or HR representative may treat a first-time violation as a learning opportunity: “We’re not going to send you home today, but going forward, we would prefer you not wear jeans with rips and holes in them.”

If someone continually flouts the rules, an employer might send him or her home and dock pay. And if the problem continues, the employee may be fired.

What’s appropriate for the office gym?

Office gyms are popular perks, but they are also landmine fields when it comes to clothing. Employees who work out at the company gym should remember that they’ll likely run into their co-workers while putting in miles on the treadmill or lifting weights. Avoid wearing T-shirts with offensive slogans or outfits that are excessively revealing, Raes recommends: “You’re still in the workplace; this is not personal time.”

What’s appropriate for the office holiday party?

Similarly, treat your office holiday party as a work experience that requires appropriate dress. Your boss will take note if you wear anything too revealing or silly.

“You want to continue to send a professional and positive message,” Yost says. “People make silent judgments all the time. They’re not going to come up and tell you, ‘That tie you wore was stupid and I lost a lot of respect for you,’ but it still may be happening in their minds.”

On Halloween, if your workplace permits employees to wear costumes, keep yours reasonable.

What about tattoos and piercings?

Attitudes toward tattoos in the workplace and piercings in the workplace have changed in the past few decades, but not every employer will be happy to see them, Yost says.

“[Tattoos] are generally more accepted than they would have been 10 or 15 years ago,” he says. “However, there are going to be some ‘family-run’ environments, or ‘family-friendly’ environments who may be a little more rigid: ‘Sure you can have your tattoos, but we’re going to ask you to keep them covered while at work.'”

If you’re wondering how to cover up tattoos for work, Yost recommends long-sleeved shirts, strategically placed Band-Aids or applying foundation makeup that’s the same color as your skin tone.

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“America’s Top 50 Organizations for Multicultural Business Opportunities” Announced

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Today, OMNIKAL announced “America’s Top 50 Organizations for Multicultural Business Opportunities”,  known as the “Omni50.”

The Omni50 represent the top 50 U.S. organizations who are awarding the most business to the growing culturally diverse marketplace. These same organizations are also successfully appealing to the growing millennial generation, which, by 2020, will be the largest diverse market segment in America (a market segment that is forcing brands to evolve from minority/diversity paradigms to inclusion).

Apple Inc. was named the #1 Organization for Multicultural Business Opportunities in the United States. Other companies at the top of the winners list include: Walmart Inc., Northrop Grumman Corporation,AT&T Inc., IBM, The Coca-Cola Company, Bank of America, Raytheon Company, Verizon, General Motors Company, Time Warner Inc., PepsiCo Inc., United Parcel Service, Cisco Systems, Inc., Colgate-Palmolive Company, Altria Group and The Kroger Company.

Who are the Omni50?

The Omni50 represents the voice of OMNIKAL’s 2,100,000 members. The list is circulated by over 1000 organizations, which reaches millions of consumers every year. Since 1999, it has become a highly valued metric of excellence in reaching the diverse and inclusive majority marketplace.

The Omni50 Awards is the most recognized honor for diversity and inclusion in the country.  These award-winning companies truly differentiate themselves in the marketplace in a time when inclusion has become one of the most important goals of every organization. It is also at a time when public recognition is key to ongoing financial, ethical, social and cultural success.

“The inclusion practices of the “Omni50” Awardees have changed the course of our current economy and as a result, the world as we know it” said Kenton Clarke, CEO of OMNIKAL. “The changing multicultural and multi-generational landscape of our country has demanded this evolution. OMNIKAL is proud to have been a force in the business world for such positive change. Our mission and goal is to equalize, broaden and level the playing field for both brands and an increasingly varied vendor/supplier marketplace.”

Top Honors for Top Organizations Who Do the Right Thing

Most “top” lists honor companies for traditional economic growth, shareholder returns and similar metrics; however, the Omni50 awards are an indicator of which organizations provide the best business opportunities to the increasingly inclusive majority marketplace. This, in turn, influences more organizations, as they compete for market share in multicultural and multigenerational communities.

The Business Power of Inclusion

As the culturally diverse market gains more buying power, corporations have to focus their efforts on rebranding and reorganizing to avoid losing market share and to remain current and relevant.

The Omni50 list has therefore become the most critical guide for businesses as well as consumers. “As a business owner, I appreciate the business we receive from corporate buyers; and in turn, when I buy either personally or for my company, I am more likely to buy from the same companies that support my business or are supporting businesses like mine,” said Kathy Steele, principle of Red Caffeine headquartered in Elmhurst, Illinois.

About OMNIKAL

OMNIKAL was founded in 1999. Now the Nation’s largest inclusive business organization, OMNIKAL promotes entrepreneurship and the belief that entrepreneurs create real world solutions to today’s business and economic challenges. By fostering deeper and broader collaboration between business owners and entrepreneurial support organizations, the OMNIKAL network fuels healthier ecosystems through job creation, professional development and drives innovation resulting in strong economic growth.

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Click here to see the full list of companies