California hiring underrepresented groups in renewable energy industry

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Clean Energy Jobs-

By Carol Zabin and Robert Collier

As California policymakers speed up the state’s switch to renewable energy, a key question is this: Do the much-touted new green jobs actually go to a diverse cross-section of the state’s workforce, or are disadvantaged communities left out?

According to data obtained and analyzed by researchers at University of California Berkeley’s Labor Center, the answer is that in recent years, a significant share of strong, career-track jobs in the construction of renewable energy power plants statewide have, in fact, gone to low-income residents and people of color.

Our recently issued report shows that the joint union-employer apprenticeship programs used in these projects have played an important role in diversifying California’s clean energy workforce.

In Kern County, local data shows that 43 percent of entry-level electrical workers on solar power plant construction lived in communities designated as disadvantaged by the California Environmental Protection Agency, while 47 percent lived in communities with unemployment rates of at least 13 percent.

Kern County electrical apprentice pay schedules show a clear progression toward the middle class. Current first-year apprentices start at $16.49 per hour plus full benefits and receive wage increases as they move through their five-year training program. Graduates become journey electricians earning more than $40 per hour.

Statewide, the picture is similar. Among the 16 union locals of electricians, ironworkers, and operating engineers that have built most of California’s renewable energy power plants, about 60 percent of new apprentices were people of color.

Diversity varied by trade. Latinos, who make up one-third of the state’s labor force, represented 53 percent of new apprentice ironworkers, 34 percent of electrical workers, and 23 percent of operating engineers. While African-Americans are 6 percent of the statewide labor force, they made up 4 percent of new apprentice electricians, 6 percent of ironworkers, and 9 percent of operating engineers.

The presence of military veterans in these programs also was higher than in California’s workforce as a whole. While veterans are only 4 percent of statewide workers, they comprised 9 percent of new electrical apprentices, 6 percent of ironworkers, and 12 percent of operating engineers.

The weak point in these apprenticeship programs, as with the rest of California’s construction industry, was the participation of women, ranging from only 2 percent to 6 percent among the three trades.

All told, the track record shows that California has made progress toward broadening access for disadvantaged workers to good jobs in the clean energy economy. But this diversity has not been automatic. A key driver of progress is the fact that most renewable energy plants were built under project labor agreements, which ensure union wage and benefit standards and free training for low-skilled workers through state-certified apprenticeships. Recruitment efforts by unions and the projects’ locations were also important since many renewable power plants are in counties such as Kern that have high unemployment and concentrations of low-income communities.

Looking forward, job access in the clean energy industry can be advanced by adopting specific programs such as publicly funded pre-apprenticeship training and local-hire provisions, in combination with project labor agreements.

Additional progress is likely if state lawmakers approve SB 100, which would commit California electricity providers to obtain 100 percent of their power from clean energy sources by 2045. This would drive further growth of renewable energy construction, which in turn would create more jobs and more openings in state-certified apprenticeship programs. The net result would be an important step forward along California’s path to meeting its climate challenge while simultaneously broadening access to middle-class jobs.

About the Authors
Carol Zabin and Robert Collier are director and policy specialist, respectively, of the Green Economy Program at the Center for Labor Research and Education at UC Berkeley.

Source: startrends.xyz

 

4 Questions Candidates Should Ask During a Job Interview

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Hispanic woman in interview

It’s a great time to be searching for jobs and exploring different opportunities. And ideally, that’ll mean going on lots of interviews.

Now, you’re surely aware that as part of the interview process, you’ll be asked a number of questions about your work experience, skills, and goals. But at some point during each conversation, you’ll most likely also be asked to come up with questions of your own. And that’s where a lot of job candidates find themselves stumped. Rather than let that happen, go in prepared with a list of insightful questions that show you’ve put thought into the role at hand. Here are a few you can start with.

1. How has the company evolved over the past few years?

Generally speaking, it’s best to work for a company that’s been showing signs of growth. And a good way to figure out whether the employer you’re applying to falls into that category is to see how it’s changed over the past few years. Ideally, your interviewer will give you insight as to how the company has progressed and developed its staff and product or service line. As a follow-up question, you might also ask how the company has adapted to recent challenges to get a sense of how it operates. Not only are these thoughtful questions, but they’re ones whose answers will inform your decision of whether to accept a job offer if you get one.

2. What has your experience been like working for this company?

Asking your interviewer about his or her personal experience working for the company you’re applying to is a good way to gain insight as to what your own experience might entail. It also shows that you’re taking an interest in your interviewer, and that you value his or her opinion.

3. What’s the company culture like?

You want to enjoy going to work, and a company whose culture promotes a pleasant environment is generally one worth pursuing. It’s always smart to ask about company culture during an interview because it can give you great insight into what your days might be like. Ask how the typical day goes for the average employee, and what steps the company takes to foster collaboration and teamwork. Along these lines, don’t hesitate to ask whether employees generally manage to maintain a decent work-life balance. While the answer might vary on a case-by-case basis, you should try to get a general sense of whether employees get enough personal time or are pushed too hard to always be available for work purposes.

4. What made the last person who filled this role successful?

Assuming you’re not the first person to land the position at hand, it pays to ask what made the previous employee good at what he or she did. Was that person a strong project manager? Was he or she a risk-taker? Asking this question shows you’re invested in being successful yourself.

The last thing you want to do during a job interview is come off as apathetic or unprepared. Before you sit down to meet with a prospective employer, jot down some important questions to ask in advance, or use the ones we’ve discussed here.

Continue on to YahooNews to read the complete article.

5 Reasons to Consider a STEM Major

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By Erin Fox

As you begin to investigate what major you should pursue, you might find yourself drawn to a STEM major. STEM majors are diverse, challenging, and offer a wide array of opportunities. From to biochemists to ocean engineers and meteorologists to applied mathematicians, colleges are preparing students in these programs for future work in exciting careers.

There are many reasons to choose a STEM major.

  • Graduates have flexibility within their profession to pursue multiple career paths
  • Average starting compensation outpaces careers in other fields
  • High level of personal and job satisfaction
  • Graduates make a positive contribution to society. Most importantly? Once students have finished their education, career opportunities abound.

Graduates can look forward to:

  1. Future Opportunities
    Pursuing a STEM major will allow you a wide variety of future opportunities after graduation. For example, pursuing an engineering major opens many doors; a graduate can seek a career in such diverse fields as chemical engineering, computer science, or environmental science. A meteorology major can seek work in a variety of venues – graduates may work in a research capacity for a private company, such as Boeing, while others may pursue work for a government entity, such as NASA or NOAA. Some may choose to work in television broadcasting.
  1. Flexibility
    There are many different areas of specialization within any STEM major. When a student graduates with a strong undergraduate degree, she is preparing herself for any future changes in her chosen field. It is impossible to predict what the future holds. Consider Aerospace Engineering – from day one, students are immersed in hands-on opportunities, such as thermal energy, mechatronics, and rocket propulsion. These experiences not only prepare students for the current workforce but also give them the tools and skills necessary to help evolve their field of study far into the future.
  1. Compensation
    STEM careers are among the highest in initial compensation for recent graduates. According to the American Engineering Association, these graduates earn 87 percent more than the average salary of a non-STEM graduate. Specifically, the average starting salary for mechanical engineering graduates is $58,392 and computer scientists start, on average, at $61,205.
  1. Job and Personal Satisfaction
    Career Cast, an online employment site dedicated to targeted job information, published a list of the Top 10 Best Jobs based on job satisfaction. Based on their research, 8 of the top 10 jobs were within STEM fields. Included in this list are software engineer, mathematician, statistician, computer systems analyst, meteorologist, and biologist.
  1. Societal Impact
    Everyday life is constantly affected by professionals from STEM programs. Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics play a role in everything from creating new ways to promote aquaculture to the design of a bridge by a civil engineer. Being on the cusp of modern technology and using a STEM education benefits the world and has an important impact on both local, national, and global matters.

Many universities are proud of their world class education offered in all of their STEM programs. These programs have been developed to not only properly educate but also strategically prepare graduates for the future workforce. Considering an undergraduate degree in a STEM area of study not only meets a student’s current educational needs but will also help shape his future career and contributions.

Source: adastra.fit.edu

Cara Santana Joins Glamsquad As Their Global Engagement Officer After Her Success With The Glam App

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Actress and former CEO of The Glam App, Cara Santana, has joined Glamsquad as their Global Engagement Officer. The longtime actress founded The Glam App after struggling to find on demand beauty services during filming in more remote locations where services were not easily accessible. After exiting her own on demand beauty platform, Santana has recently joined the Glamsquad team to bring a fresh perspective to their scaling business model. She shares how she went from a Hollywood start to entrepreneur.

Yola Robert: You have pursued acting since the age of fifteen, but have always loved the world of business.  How did you shift from the acting world into the business world? 

Cara Santana: My fiancé is also an actor so I would end up getting a lot of attention on what I was wearing to events or red carpets when I was with him. He encouraged me to start a blog to keep meaningful conversation ongoing with women from around the world. I loved helping women feel like luxury was accessible. Eventually, I started working with brands as a digital influencer and that was my first foray into the business world.

Robert: The idea for The Glam App came to you when you were shooting Salem in Shreveport, Louisiana. What white space in on demand beauty did you discover while you were there?

Santana: I had arrived in Shreveport with only 24 hours to get rid of my acrylic nails, fake eyelashes and long ombre hair extension. I didn’t have transportation, they wouldn’t send anyone to me and I had no idea who I would even go to in the area. I thought to myself, “Gosh, this must be a problem that women find themselves in all the time.” I wanted to find a way to give accessibility to luxury beauty services at any time. As an actress I have developed relationships with so many hair stylists and makeup artists so it made sense to create an equally advantageous platform for not only a consumer of beauty, but also a provider of beauty. That was the catalyst to launching.

Robert: Being the founder and CEO of The Glam App was your version of business school. How was your experience going to business school in real life?

Santana: It was a long journey of trial and error. If I had known everything I was going to encounter and all the struggles that would have come my way, I probably wouldn’t have launched a business.

Robert: What advice do you have for women out there who are thinking about starting a business?

Santana: Firstly, You have to be super passionate about what you are doing. Secondly, surround yourself with people that are better at doing things than you are. I think the reason why The Glam App was so successful was because I hired people with my weaknesses as their strengths. Thirdly, don’t be afraid to ask for help.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

This Latina Started A Studio With Her Family And Became One Of NYC’s Top Trainers In The Process

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Samantha Ortiz started a business before even realizing she started a business. A couple of times a week, her sister and her sister’s best friend would find themselves in the Ortiz family living room getting ready to be led in a workout by Samantha. Thanks to social media and personal referrals,what started with just the three of them slowly grew into more structured classes — and this was the beginning of Triple Threat Bootcamp, or the Ortiz family business.

“I outgrew my parents’ living room,” explained Samantha Ortiz. “I had to start running bootcamp classes in public parks and [eventually] I rented a small studio on the 3rd floor of a building, but [even that] still didn’t feel like home to me. I had this image in my head of having a fitness studio designed with monkey bars, a slam wall, a view overlooking Brooklyn, equipment all around the room and a place where my clients could call home. A few months after renting the small studio, my family and I were driving up Flatbush Avenue in Brooklyn and as we stopped at a light, I looked up and saw a “for rent” sign. We called and the rest is history.”

Samantha’s mother, Aileen Ortiz, who now serves as President and CEO of TTB, never doubted the why behind her daughter’s decision because she related to it herself.

“I was motivated by the vision of seeing the three of us using our talents and skills to bring a healthy lifestyle to others,” shared Aileen. “My interest in healthy living began 26 years ago and I instilled that in my girls from a young age.”

The duo is rounded out by Christine Ortiz, Samantha’s sister and the studio’s Operation Manager and co-owner.

“We have always believed in health and wellness,” shared Christine Ortiz. “Combining fitness and nutrition was a no brainer once Samantha became a trainer. We wanted to impact more people in our community and be pioneers of female fitness entrepreneurship.”

With their mother at the helm, the studio has grown to be a staple in their Brooklyn neighborhood and has provided a platform for others to experience Samantha’s training style. This year, for a second year in a row, Classpass (the flexible fitness membership app) recognized Samantha as one of its top fitness instructors in New York City.

The recognition serves to underscore how Samantha’s mission behind TTB has simply been amplified as its grown.

“I was inspired to open Triple Threat Bootcamp because motivating others to be the best versions of themselves has always been my passion,” says Samantha Ortiz. “I felt like it was my mission to bring fitness and health to my community.”

Below Samantha shares more insight on what it has been like running a business with her mom and sister, what advice she has for other Latinas, and what she would do differently.

Vivian Nunez: What advice do you have for any Latinas who are looking to break into fitness and the business world?

Samantha Ortiz:I love to remind my fellow Latinas that anything is possible. Being Latina in the fitness industry and owning a fitness studio with your family (mom and sister) isn’t normal by any means but that’s what I love about it. You don’t have to follow the crowd, you can create your own lane. Don’t be afraid to go after what fuels your soul. Even if you don’t know everything, you will learn along the way. Life is about taking chances and learning from every experience. Last piece of advice, network. Go to events, reach out to people who are in your field of work. There’s nothing like being surrounded by like minded people.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Under Alex Gallardo, New Artistic Direction For Sony Music US Latin

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At a time when Latin music is experiencing unprecedented popularity and Sony leads the Latin category in U.S. market share, according to Nielsen Music, Nir Seroussi’s unexpected exit from Sony Music U.S. Latin — on Jan. 18, after four years as president and another four as managing director — came as a surprise to the Latin music community. Sony did not give a reason for the change, although both the label and Seroussi said they were parting on amicable terms.

But the announcement of Alex Gallardo, 43, as the division’s new president puts an artist favorite at the helm of the company and reinforces its commitment to investing in A&R.

“Sony Music Latin Iberia is the home of the artists and will always be. It’s my most important flag,” Afo Verde, Sony Music Entertainment’s chairman/CEO of Latin America, Spain and Portugal tells Billboard. “[Alex] is a consummate professional, musician, A&R, lover of music and all of its creative process from start to finish.”

Gallardo, who spent six years as senior vp A&R for all of the company’s regions and is known as firm and even, will oversee a staff of nearly 100. “What’s important is to understand artists, their needs and motivations, and to create the best environment possible for their creativity to flow,” he says. And his appointment was met with praise from many in the artist community. In a statement, Shakira called Gallardo a “professional” who is “in touch with the musical landscape and understands artists,” while Ricky Martin says, “His focus, knowledge and passion makes artists trust the process.”

To read the complete article, continue on to Billboard.

This Latina Went From Product Development To A Frida-Focused Online Pop-Up Store

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For Tatiana Figueiredo a career in entrepreneurship wasn’t the end goal. Figueiredo was building a career in product development across tech companies when she started an Instagram for fun. Her intention behind the Instagram page was to celebrate Frida and her contributions to her own Latinidad, over time the Instagram page has garnered thousands of followers and now serves as a marketplace for Frida-inspired artwork.

“I learned as a product manager that the most important skill is not knowing everything but knowing where to find the information you need and then learn it quickly,” shares Figueiredo. It’s a huge deal to just know that the answer is not necessarily to hire an expert but instead to spend a few days nerding out to learn something..

Her tech background and exposure to the startup world has helped her navigate an entirely different career than she expected. Her understanding of her parents’ expectations of her has also helped her make peace with the guilt that came with leaving her steady job.

“My parents sacrificed everything to move to this country for my sister and I. Then, when it feels like everything is going well with my career, I’m making good money, moving up fast, all of a sudden I declare that I’m going to quit and [to pursue a passion project because] “I’m not fulfilled in my current work”. That’s just not something my family will ever be able to relate to. What has helped me is to put all that first-generation guilty energy into doing my best making sure the things I’m building are successful. I owe them that.”

Below Figueiredo shares advice for Latinas who are teetering between a traditional job and wanting to pursue their own passions, what inspired her to focus on Frida, and how she balances consulting with building up the brand.

Vivian Nunez: What red flags would you encourage others to look for when it comes to career transitions? 

Tatiana Figueiredo: I think the idea of “going all in” is romanticized too much. Whether you’re going into entrepreneurship or just want to transition to another job, do the work for the transition while you’re still grounded in a job – and a paycheck. From my experience this is better than just quitting and starting from scratch for a lot of reasons. First, you don’t want to put too much financial burden on your next opportunity from day one. If it’s something you’re doing on the side at first, you’ll have more time and energy to figure it out without money pressures. Also, creatively, you’ll have time to expand your focus and have fun if you think of it as just a side project. And most importantly, you might have a great idea but you might actually hate working on it. By doing it on the side for a while you’ll be able to tell if it’s something that gives you the kind of energy you’re looking for. Same when looking for a new job: talk to the people doing it, ask about their day-to-day, try to live a day in your new life and see if it’s what you really want.

Nunez: What inspired you to use Frida as the center for your new brand? 

Figueiredo: I studied a little art history in high school and college and always thought Frida was the most unique artist we studied. In those classes, I think she was literally the only female artist we focused on. I was immediately drawn to her work and her life. I researched all I could about her, watched the documentaries, read her diary. While I was learning about Frida in Art History, I was also studying Latin American History and Spanish. It was through all these things that I began to connect my experience as an immigrant from Brazil to the broader experience of women in Latin America and Latinas in the US. Frida’s story and voice was always inspiring to me because of her mix of strength and vulnerability that was so familiar to me because I saw it in the women of my family.

But I didn’t intend to make her the center of a brand at first. I didn’t think I was even starting a brand. I started the Instagram as a side project while I was winding down a bigger work project. I had been saving images I saw on Instagram and figured I’d just post them kind of as a public art board. It was just for fun. After I started I realized the lack of women artists I saw in Art History years earlier was still a thing. Even on Instagram, the big art accounts post male artists 90% of the time. So I made it a rule that we would only post non-male artists. It was from there and through the Instagram account that I met a few women artists to partner with for a pop up shop and the brand grew from there.

Nunez: How has your Latinidad inspired your career? 

Figueiredo: Where I’m from – and in many Latin American countries – entrepreneurship is not something cool that some people get to do, it’s how people survive. I come from a family where everyone runs a business. My parents always ran businesses, my aunts and uncles all had their hustles, it seemed like I was always around someone trying to create a new thing to make money. In Portuguese and Spanish there’s not even a cool word for it like “entrepreneurship.” As varied as it has become, my career still seems like an internet version of what my grandparents started (because they had to).

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

A Latino Wine Company Is Challenging Perceptions in Washington, D.C.

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Politics aside, Washington, D.C., has undergone a remarkable transition in recent years. Its dining scene has evolved from cookie-cutter steakhouses and chain restaurants (plus a reliable handful of Ethiopian-American destinations), to boldly creative bars and restaurants showcasing culinary influences from the Mid-Atlantic and around the world.

The wine scene is evolving, too. Until quite recently, there were very few places Washingtonians could go to learn more about “New World” wine from places like ArgentinaChile, and Uruguay, and be able to take home a bottle to enjoy with their family and friends.

Enter Grand Cata, A Latino Wine Company.

For owners and friends Julio Robledo and Pedro Rodriguez, opening a specialty wine store presented an opportunity to raise awareness about the diversity of Latin American wine. It was also chance to embrace their cultural identity and improve the representation of Latin America across the city.

“We met in late 2007, working for a Latino-focused non-profit organization,” Robledo says. “For both of us, wine has always been our passion. I remember growing up as a kid in Chile, seeing a bottle of wine would mean happiness — at family barbecues, holidays, birthdays and so on. Through a bottle of wine, we can tell a story, share how we grew up, and, in a way, bring part of our family here to the city.”

To read the complete article, continue on to Vinepair. 

The Hispanic consumer has a major impact on the 2019 U.S. markets

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If one thing is clear as we start 2019, it’s that America is changing. According to a Claritas report (registration required), in the United States today, there are 131 million multicultural Americans, making up 37.5% of the U.S. population, with Hispanics accounting for the largest portion at 19.6%.

Minority groups now represent the majority of the population in more than 400 U.S. counties. There can be no doubt that America is becoming multicultural and that Hispanics are a significant part of this change.

Although some brands are starting to face the facts, there is a still a long way to go before advertisers understand the U.S. Hispanic market and unlock its potential.

What’s Changed

From the enormous success of Black Panther and Crazy Rich Asians to the rising popularity of Hispanic celebrities like Cardi B, America has changed a lot in the past year. We’ve seen advancement in film representation, a resurgence in cultural and political movements, and the continued popularity and application of technology like smart homes and streaming media. And 2019 will be no different, with these changes impacting not only the people living in the U.S. but also brands across industries that will have to evolve with the changing American landscape.

According to 2017 estimates from the Census Bureau, there are over 58.9 million Hispanics living in the United States, and by 2030, U.S. Hispanics are expected to reach more than 72 million. More than that, this growth doesn’t just mean more Hispanics, it also means a transformation of the Hispanic market.

Hispanic consumers today are not the same as Hispanic consumers from years back. They are now the youngest ethnic group in America with the median age being 28. Realizing their youth is crucial for advertisers as it influences their media consumption habits, the technology they use, their abundance in prime spending years, and much more. Hispanics — especially in the younger age groups of the U.S. population — are also increasingly more diverse than older Americans. As a matter of fact, almost half of the U.S. millennial population will be multicultural by 2024 (registration required).

To read the complete article, continue on to Forbes.

One female engineer shatters space’s glass ceiling

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How one woman overcame adversity and found success in space.

Diana Trujillo has always looked to the stars.

Growing up in Colombia during the 1980s, a place and time known for its civil unrest, she would stargaze to escape from the danger in her country. “I knew there had to be something better than this,” she recalls, adding, “Somewhere better than where I was.”

It’s that yearning which pushed Trujillo to immigrate to the United States with only $300 in her pocket, receive a degree in aerospace mechanics and biomechanics, and become one of the first Hispanic women to break into the aerospace industry.

Today, Trujillo oversees dozens of engineers and spearheads crucial projects, including a rover mission to Mars to explore the Gale Crater with one of the most technologically advanced rovers ever built.

We recently sat down with Trujillo to discuss resilience, the future of STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics), and her advice for thriving in a male-dominated industry. Here’s an excerpt of the conversation, edited and condensed for clarity:

Q:| You went from being a Hispanic immigrant who didn’t speak English to one of the country’s top female engineers. How did you turn what many would consider an adversity into an asset for your career?

It was an asset the whole time—I needed to decide how I would see it. My upbringing has taught me that you never give up. I’m not shy of asking what I want to do. I don’t run away from the problem; I run toward the problem. It’s something my peers find very valuable, because they know I’m going to grab any problem by the horns.

Q:| What’s been the biggest challenge in your career so far and what did you do to overcome it?

Honestly, the biggest challenge has been to get over myself. I often text my husband saying, “Oh, man, I’m in a meeting with 17 people and I’m the only girl.” So what if I’m the only girl? It doesn’t make me less capable. I’m all about having more women in the workforce, and having more women of color in the workforce. So, when there aren’t any other women in the room, I need to do my best and let other women in. If I’m too preoccupied about being the only one, I won’t perform.

Q:| What advice do you have for women to get over themselves, own a room, and own their place at the table?

It’s not about you; it’s about the goal. You need to focus on the goal. Nobody’s going to argue with you if your discussion is all about the goal. When the goal is bigger than you, it’s doesn’t matter who sets it because it’s for the greater good of the team.

Continue onto JP Morgan Chase to read the complete article.

How to Write an Impressive Cover Letter From Scratch in 30 Minutes

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You know enough to regularly update you resume—so if you find a job posting you’re interested in, you’re halfway through the application process.The other half, of course, is your cover letter. If you have some time and are just rusty, you can make a game plan to write a draft, then take a break, and come back to it with fresh eyes.

But if you see the deadline to apply is just 30 minutes away, you don’t have any time to spare. Here’s how to write a cover letter that will bolster your application—in just half an hour. (And if you need to revamp your resume or prep for interview in the same amount time, look here and here.)

Minutes 1 Through 10: Write Down Your Main Points

Maybe it’s just me, but I often struggle the most on the opening line of a cover letter. I know I shouldn’t lead with “My name is…,” and I want something that’ll grab the hiring manager’s attention. But my quest for the perfect beginning can lead me to spend 15 minutes (or more) typing and deleting the same line over and over. (And at that rate, my 30-minute cover letter would be all of two sentences.)

So, skip the intro if need be, and just start writing about why you’re a great fit for the open position. Don’t stress about the very best way to phrase your current responsibilities. Just write down your main points.

Need a prompt? Answer these questions: What do you find most exciting (or interesting) about the position? What relevant experience do you have? What would you bring to the role (and/or company) that’s unique to you?

Definitely make sure to have your resume and the job description open or printed out next to you. That way you can glance over at both and make sure you’re highlighting the right experience.

Minutes 10 Through 20: Add in Examples

OK, so you’ve written out all of reasons why you’re perfect for the job. Now it’s time to make sure you’re on the same page as the hiring manager. How so? Go back to that job description.

Re-read what the position calls for. Did you mention the experience and skills they’ll be screening for? To connect the dots in a way that’s clear—but wouldn’t be confused with a laundry list—add in an example or two.

If the job calls for people skills, swap out the line that reads, “I have excellent people skills” with a line that explains how in previous roles you’ve managed relationships with board members, which taught you about working with opinionated stakeholders. Does the position call for someone with sales experience? An anecdote about how you’ve been in sales since you set up your first lemonade stand when you were seven years old is memorable.

Continue onto Muse to read the complete article.