California hiring underrepresented groups in renewable energy industry

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Clean Energy Jobs-

By Carol Zabin and Robert Collier

As California policymakers speed up the state’s switch to renewable energy, a key question is this: Do the much-touted new green jobs actually go to a diverse cross-section of the state’s workforce, or are disadvantaged communities left out?

According to data obtained and analyzed by researchers at University of California Berkeley’s Labor Center, the answer is that in recent years, a significant share of strong, career-track jobs in the construction of renewable energy power plants statewide have, in fact, gone to low-income residents and people of color.

Our recently issued report shows that the joint union-employer apprenticeship programs used in these projects have played an important role in diversifying California’s clean energy workforce.

In Kern County, local data shows that 43 percent of entry-level electrical workers on solar power plant construction lived in communities designated as disadvantaged by the California Environmental Protection Agency, while 47 percent lived in communities with unemployment rates of at least 13 percent.

Kern County electrical apprentice pay schedules show a clear progression toward the middle class. Current first-year apprentices start at $16.49 per hour plus full benefits and receive wage increases as they move through their five-year training program. Graduates become journey electricians earning more than $40 per hour.

Statewide, the picture is similar. Among the 16 union locals of electricians, ironworkers, and operating engineers that have built most of California’s renewable energy power plants, about 60 percent of new apprentices were people of color.

Diversity varied by trade. Latinos, who make up one-third of the state’s labor force, represented 53 percent of new apprentice ironworkers, 34 percent of electrical workers, and 23 percent of operating engineers. While African-Americans are 6 percent of the statewide labor force, they made up 4 percent of new apprentice electricians, 6 percent of ironworkers, and 9 percent of operating engineers.

The presence of military veterans in these programs also was higher than in California’s workforce as a whole. While veterans are only 4 percent of statewide workers, they comprised 9 percent of new electrical apprentices, 6 percent of ironworkers, and 12 percent of operating engineers.

The weak point in these apprenticeship programs, as with the rest of California’s construction industry, was the participation of women, ranging from only 2 percent to 6 percent among the three trades.

All told, the track record shows that California has made progress toward broadening access for disadvantaged workers to good jobs in the clean energy economy. But this diversity has not been automatic. A key driver of progress is the fact that most renewable energy plants were built under project labor agreements, which ensure union wage and benefit standards and free training for low-skilled workers through state-certified apprenticeships. Recruitment efforts by unions and the projects’ locations were also important since many renewable power plants are in counties such as Kern that have high unemployment and concentrations of low-income communities.

Looking forward, job access in the clean energy industry can be advanced by adopting specific programs such as publicly funded pre-apprenticeship training and local-hire provisions, in combination with project labor agreements.

Additional progress is likely if state lawmakers approve SB 100, which would commit California electricity providers to obtain 100 percent of their power from clean energy sources by 2045. This would drive further growth of renewable energy construction, which in turn would create more jobs and more openings in state-certified apprenticeship programs. The net result would be an important step forward along California’s path to meeting its climate challenge while simultaneously broadening access to middle-class jobs.

About the Authors
Carol Zabin and Robert Collier are director and policy specialist, respectively, of the Green Economy Program at the Center for Labor Research and Education at UC Berkeley.

Source: startrends.xyz

 

ADP Foundation Awards Grant For Mujeres De Hace Program

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The ADP Foundation Provides Grant to HACE’s Latina Women’s Leadership Program

The Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement will bestow multiple scholarships with grant to expand the women’s leadership program in new key cities.

Latina professionals will have greater access to the Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement’s (HACE) women’s leadership program, thanks to a grant received from the ADP® Foundation. Many women who would otherwise be unable to afford the full tuition for the program will be able to benefit from full or partial scholarships in the fall. “The scholarships awarded will be instrumental in achieving a bigger reach in newer markets we have expanded to, such as Atlanta and San Francisco,” says Laurin Bello, HACE Program Manager, “the support ADP has given us makes them an invaluable partner for HACE as they continue to help us reach Latina professionals.”

The Mujeres de HACE program, a leadership program designed to help high-potential Latina professionals grow and develop in their careers, has successfully graduated over 800 women. The grant will allow HACE to serve 15-30 additional Latina professionals across the U.S., including Atlanta, GA; Chicago, IL; Dallas, TX; Houston, TX; Minneapolis, MN; McLean, VA; New York, NY; San Francisco, CA and Miami, FL.

“HACE would like to thank the ADP Foundation for their generous support,” said Patricia Mota, HACE President and CEO. “On average, Latinas are reported to earn 55 cents to the dollar compared to their Caucasian male counterparts, that is at least 20 cents below Caucasian women. Furthermore, Latina professionals are constantly balancing traditional cultural norms with workplace norms, which simultaneously creates unique opportunities and barriers to advancement.  With this grant, HACE will be able to impact the lives of more Latina professionals across the country, helping to close the wage and opportunity gaps that ultimately hurt our communities and the overall economy.”

Mujeres de HACE has proven to help close the wage and opportunity gaps, with over 80% of women reporting a raise, promotion or both within a year of participating in the program. After completing the program, many women join leadership boards, fundraise for program scholarships to support other women and even start their own businesses.

Continue onto HACE Online to read the complete article.

Meet PepsiCo’s Next CEO: Ramon Laguarta

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Spaniard joined PepsiCo in 1996 and rose through the ranks in Europe; ‘the future is not going to be easy,’ he recently told staff.

Ramon Laguarta took away an important lesson in 2015 when PepsiCoInc. PEP +1.45% ended a failed joint venture to sell yogurt in the U.S.: You need to go small before you go big.

Now the 54-year-old is set to take the helm of PepsiCo as the maker of Lay’s potato chips and Mountain Dew continues to expand its offerings in response to rapidly shifting consumer tastes.

“We need to think [carefully] about moving into a new space where we’re probably not as competent as our core categories,” Mr. Laguarta, who takes over as CEO for Indra Nooyi on Oct. 3, said in an interview.

“We’re trying to do multiple testings in countries around the world,” he said. “When we see if something is working, then we scale it up.”

Mr. Laguarta is a native of Barcelona who speaks English, Spanish, French, German, Greek and Catalan. He has an M.B.A. from Spain’s ESADE business school and worked at Chupa Chups SA, a candy company based in Spain, before joining PepsiCo in 1996.

He rose through the ranks of the European operations, becoming head of PepsiCo’s Europe and sub-Saharan Africa business. Last year he was tapped as Ms. Nooyi’s No. 2 and relocated to the U.S. from Geneva with his wife, Maria. They have three sons.

Mr. Laguarta broadened the company’s beverage portfolio in Europe, promoting a sugar-free version of Pepsi called Pepsi Max, as consumers moved away from sugary sodas. It’s now a billion-dollar brand, and his favorite cola.

Continue onto the Wall Street Journal to read the complete article.

How This Mompreneur Turned A Tight Budget And Doubt Into A Successful Cotton Candy Business

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When we no longer fear failure, we often open ourselves up to our best ideas. 

For Lucia Rios, the decision to become an entrepreneur was one of survival. Although she had never considered business ownership before, she needed something to do—a creative outlet, a place to funnel her attention as a mother with post-partum depression. So one day, she assessed her small budget like she would any family purchase and started to scheme up potential products. She ultimately decided on cotton candy. It required little overhead, had room for creativity and seemed, at the very least, an exciting change.

Now, a few years later, that side hustle has turned into Rios’ full-time gig, complete with facilities, staff and a long client list. Christened TWISTED, Rios’ business caters some of California’s largest events and partners with brands like USA Network. In this interview, Rios explores the growth of TWISTED, why she’s on a mission to increase Latina visibility in business ownership and the influences of motherhood on her new identity as an entrepreneur.

Jane Claire Hervey: How would you describe who you are and what do you do?

Lucia Rios: I am Lucia Rios-Hernandez, the sweet creator of TWISTED, a gourmet cotton candy company that caters events with live, on-the-spot-twisting, as well as pre-packaged, ready-to-eat treats. I am a mom of two kiddos, a wife, a daughter, a mom-prenuer, a feminist, a person of color and, somedays, Mary Poppins.

Hervey: TWISTED has significantly grown since its launch date. What have been some of your most exciting projects and/or clients over the last few years?

Rios: As corny as it sounds, each and every project and client has been amazing, and I don’t take any order or job for granted. I started this as a way to heal from my post-partum depression, as a way to be a better mother to my daughter and son, so each person that supports this business supports me through this journey. However, I will always—always—cheer on the network called WE ALL GROW LATINA. It was one of my first big events and it changed my life in more ways than one. I was able to get an understanding of what networking meant. I met many amazing women and mothers who have since become my  friends. I was able to get my first corporate client and many others since.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Walmart Supports Future Leaders Through $2 Million in Funding to the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute

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Latinos at office meeting

BENTONVILLE, Ark. – July 24, 2018 – Today, Walmart announced $2 million in grants to organizations working to expand internship opportunities for diverse youth populations, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation, Inc. (CBCF) and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI).

The grants build on previous Walmart funding to the two nonprofits, bringing the company’s total investment to more than $6 million over the last several years. The funding will help provide career pathways on Capitol Hill for students and young professionals through education and hands-on experience in the nation’s capital.

At Walmart, our commitment to diversity and inclusion spreads beyond our stores and out into the communities where our associates and customers live. Through relationships with organizations like CHCI and CBCF that reflect the diversity of American society, we can open the door to help more young people build a career in public service and expand the pipeline of talent on Capitol Hill and beyond by providing our future leaders with the tools needed for success.

– Julie Gehrki, vice president of programs at Walmart

At a time when people of color currently make up less than 20 percent of U.S. lawmakers (Pew Research Center), these grants come at a critical moment. Although diverse populations represent approximately 36 percent of the population, only 7.1 percent are senior staffers in the Senate, according to the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies.

The CBCF will receive a three-year, $1 million grant to help prepare college students and young professionals for careers in public policy and advocacy. The funding will provide exposure to the development and implementation of national policies – from Capitol Hill to federal field offices – as well as support intern housing, monthly stipends, professional development and leadership training.

A three-year, $1 million grant to the CHCI will provide Latino undergraduates with paid summer or spring Congressional internships. Through Walmart’s support, students will gain valuable work experience, benefit from a strong leadership development curriculum, participate in a community service project and interact with professionals and industry leaders in Washington, D.C.

“The CBCF is committed to increasing diversity on Capitol Hill and in the public sector by creating a new generation of informed and engaged citizens and leaders,” said Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Chair, CBCF Board of Directors. “Internships are a critical component toward building a career in public policy. Through Walmart’s continued support and dedicated partnership, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation has successfully increased the number of scholars who have access to the intern-to-staffer pipeline.”

“Walmart has led the way as the Founding Partner for CHCI’s Congressional Internship Program by significantly investing in our nation’s future leaders,” said Rep. Joaquín Castro, chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute. “We value Walmart’s support of CHCI’s mission to address underrepresentation of Latinos on Capitol Hill by providing transformative experiences and the critical skills needed to embark on careers in public service.”

Walmart has a long history supporting diversity and inclusion to create equal access to opportunity. Recently, Walmart and the Walmart Foundation granted nearly $4 million to organizations helping to promote access, equity and inclusion among diverse populations. The funding was part of the Foundation’s Diversity & Inclusion competitive grant competition, which provides support to initiatives with measurable impact on and demonstrated reach into diverse communities including African Americans, Hispanic/Latino, Native American, Asian American and Pacific Islander, women and girls, the LGBTQ community and individuals with disabilities.

For more information on Walmart’s commitment to diversity and education, please visit corporate.walmart.com/global-responsibility/opportunity/diversity-and-inclusion.

About Walmart

Walmart Inc. (NYSE: WMT) helps people around the world save money and live better – anytime and anywhere – in retail stores, online, and through their mobile devices. Each week, nearly 270 million customers and members visit our more than 11,700 stores under 65 banners in 28 countries and eCommerce websites. With fiscal year 2018 revenue of $500.3 billion, Walmart employs approximately 2.3 million associates worldwide. Walmart continues to be a leader in sustainability, corporate philanthropy and employment opportunity. Additional information about Walmart can be found by visiting corporate.walmart.com, on Facebook at facebook.com/walmart  and on Twitter at twitter.com/walmart.

8 In-Demand Skills That Will Complement Any Resume

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Hispanic Businesswoman

By Megan Ruesink

You know it’s time for a change—a pay bump and a position where you feel more like an actual professional—but you’re not quite ready to commit to pursuing one career over another. That’s okay.

There are still some things you can be doing to invest in your future right now.There are plenty of skills to learn and implement into your life that may help you when you’re finally ready to apply for that new job or join that program. Take a look at what these employers, business leaders, resume professionals and more are saying about skills to learn that will help you grow and complement your future resume.

4 in-demand ‘soft’ skills

“Future professionals—no matter the field they are entering—need to focus on soft skills that are easily transferable to any position,” says Rothbauer-Wanish, owner of Feather Communications.

Take a look at these four “soft” skills that can help you grow as a person and bolster your resume for nearly any career.

  1. Relationship-building

“Recruiters and hiring managers consistently seek those employees who can relate well to a variety of co-workers, partner with customers, establish ongoing relationships and demonstrate exceptional communication skills,” says Rothbauer-Wanish.

No matter the career you pursue, it’s a safe bet that you’ll end up working with others. This doesn’t mean you have to be best friends with everyone you interact with, but the ability to understand and relate with others is an important foundational skill.

  1. Communication

Communication skills—both written and oral—are also desirable traits among potential employees. Every career requires communication. Whether it’s responding to client emails, collaborating with teammates or presenting in front of team leads, the ability to communicate clearly and concisely is an important skill to possess and refine. If you’re looking to improve your communication ability, organizations like Toastmasters are a great way to get yourself into form.

  1. Critical thinking

Critical-thinking ability is a universally useful skill—practically every job requires you to evaluate situations and make decisions that might not always have a clear right answer. The ability to weigh evidence and project potential outcomes will play a key role in your ability to perform well in nearly any role—whether it’s as a nurse or financial advisor. While this ability isn’t something that can be honed with the snap of your fingers, there are strategies you can employ to refine your critical-thinking skills over time.

  1. Adaptability

Adaptability is important to both small and large companies, says James Kemper, president of W.H. Meanor & Associates.

“Due in part to greatly improved communication and data collection capabilities, events that would take months or even years to develop are reduced to weeks and days,” he says. “So it is important in your resume that you can demonstrate how you’ve encountered or were tasked to resolve challenging situations that may not have been in your scope of understanding, and how you dealt with them.”

4 in-demand ‘hard’ skills

Obviously, when it comes to your future resume, you’ll need industry-specific skills to jump out at those reading it. But in the for now, as you figure out what you really want to do, why not work on some “hard skills” that will look good on a nearly every resume and likely play some part in your future career.

  1. Coding

“In a technology-driven world, having technological skills are highly sought after. The basics of Microsoft Office are a necessity,” says Ajay Prasad, founder and president of GMR Web Team. “But other skills, such as coding, can be very attractive. Even in positions where you don’t expect to need to know coding, it can still come in handy.”

Prasad uses the example of an HTML newsletter or email in need of edits or a website that could use a little tweaking. Knowing some codes in these areas can easily be put to good use. Additionally, coding skills can be used to automate simple repetitive tasks—which can be a huge time saver.

  1. Data analysis

“A lot of today’s jobs revolve more and more around data,” says Bradley Shaw, president and CEO of SEO Consulting Inc. “And even in jobs like content marketing or customer support, you’ll be dealing with some data on a regular basis. Showing a future employer that you’ve used data to make decisions at work in another industry, or even to do something like grow your social media can go a long way.”

While not every job in the world will require a deep statistical analysis of data, being able to identify trends and interpret changes in data can help you make informed decisions.

  1. Software skills

Gaining software skills within your area of study or industry can be helpful skills for your future career and a great way to pad your resume.

“If you want to obtain a job in accounting, get training in accounting software packages; if you want to get into HR learn as many Human Resources Information System (HRIS) software packages as possible,” says Dawn Boyer, PhD, author and consultant.

  1. Budgeting

The ability to set and adhere to a budget is a versatile and valuable skill. While the benefits of being able to manage a budget are much more obvious for business-related careers, there’s still good reason to develop budgeting skills. For one, budgeting is a great skill for your personal life. But beyond that, even careers that have very little to do with business or money management have the potential for you to reach a management position that may require careful management of finances.

About Rasmussen College

Rasmussen College is a regionally accredited private college that is dedicated to changing lives and the communities it serves through high-demand and flexible educational programs. Since 1900, the College has been committed to academic innovation and empowering students to pursue a college degree. Rasmussen College offers certificate and diploma programs through associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in seven schools of study including business, health sciences, nursing, technology, design, education and justice studies.

Source: rasmussen.edu/student-life/blogs/college-life/in-demand-skills-to-complement-any-resume/

Starting a Business? Steps every entrepreneur needs to know

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Woman Opening A Store

Confused about the planning, legal and regulatory steps you should follow? Did you know that home-based businesses are required to hold permits to operate legally in most states? What about incorporation? Many new businesses assume they need to incorporate or become an LLC from the get-go—but the truth is, more than 70 percent of small businesses are owned by unincorporated sole proprietors (although even this group is required to register their businesses).

So, variables aside, there are still some fundamental steps that any business needs to follow to get started. Below are steps that can help you plan, prepare, and manage your business—while taking care of the startup legalities. Not all these steps will apply to all businesses, but working through them will give you a sense of what needs your attention and what you can check off.

Write a Business Plan

Yeah, yeah, you know you should write a business plan whether you need to secure a business loan or not. The thing is, a business plan doesn’t have to be encyclopedic and it doesn’t have to have all the answers. A well-prepared plan—revisited often—will help you steer your business all along its growth curve. Try to think of your business plan as a living, breathing project, not a one-time document. Break it down into mini-plans—one for marketing, one for pricing, one for operations, and so on.

Get Help and Training

Starting a business can be a lonely endeavor, but there are lots of free in-person and online resources  that can help advise you as you get started. Check out what‘s offered at your Small Business Development Centers; SCORE, at score.com (which offers free mentoring services); Women’s Business Centers, your local U.S. Small Business Association (SBA) office, or the US Business Leadership Network® (USBLN®).

Choose Your Business Location

Where you locate your business may be the single most important decision you make. Many factors come into play such as proximity to suppliers, the competition, transportation access, demographics, and zoning regulations.

Understand Your Financing Options

You may choose to bootstrap, fall back on savings, or even keep a full-time job until your business is profitable, but if you are looking for an external source of financing, these resources explain your options.

Decide on a Business Structure

Going it alone or forming a partnership? Thinking of incorporating? What about an LLC? How you structure your business can reduce your personal liability for business losses and debts. Some choices can give you tax benefits. To help you determine the right structure for your business, the SBA can provide an overview of your options, information on how to file the necessary paperwork in your state, and the tax implications of your decision.

Register Your Business Name (“Doing Business As”)

Registering a “Doing Business As” name or “trade name” is only needed if you name your business something other than your personal name, the names of your partners, or the officially registered name of your LLC or corporation.

Get a Tax ID

Not every business needs a tax ID from the IRS (also known as an “Employer Identification Number” or EIN), but if you have employees, run a business partnership, a corporation or meet certain IRS criteria, you must obtain an EIN from the IRS. You’ll also need to start paying estimated taxes to the IRS; visit irs.gov for more about this process.

Register with Tax Authorities

Employment taxes, sales taxes, and state income taxes are handled at the state-level. Visit sba.gov to learn more about your state’s tax requirements and how to comply.

Apply for Permits and Licenses

All businesses, even home-based businesses, need a license or permit to operate. The SBA provides a guide explaining permits and licensing and includes a handy “Permit Me” tool that lets you determine what your permit and licensing needs are, based on your zip code and business type.

The SBA is one of your best resources for establishing, operating and growing your business.

Source: SBA

What makes HISPANIC Network Magazine a top minority magazine?

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latinos looking at iPad

According to the Census Bureau, an estimated 57.5 million Hispanics live in the U.S., accounting for approximately 18% of the country’s population.

This number is expected to rise and with it comes more opportunities to discuss diversity and inclusion in society and the workplace.

Currently, there are more than four million Hispanic-owned businesses throughout the U.S., and their revenues have climbed to more than $700 billion, according to the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. In fact, Hispanic-owned businesses are growing in number at a rate that is 15 times the national rate.

Coming alongside the community in this exciting period of growth is Hispanic Network Magazine, a publication for anyone looking to engage with a minority magazine, latino magazine or hispanic magazine.

HISPANIC Network Magazine is a resource to assist businesses with their multicultural hiring and supplier needs. The goal of the hispanic magazine is to create an environment of teamwork in which Latin Americans and other minorities have access to all applicable business and career opportunities.

The Hispanic community is making strides in education, politics, government and the labor force. They have demonstrated their ability and determination to break barriers and expand their influence. Within the pages of HISPANIC Network Magazine, you will find stories that illustrate the ingenuity and resilience of Hispanic Americans and other minority populations.

HISPANIC Network Magazine has covered ‘Jane the Virgin’ star, Gina Rodriguez and how she balances social responsibility alongside stardom. Read about when Rodriguez decided to put her allotted FYC spend from CBS TV Studios toward paying for the education of an undocumented high school student here.

The magazine has also covered the 35-year-old Air Force veteran who made history by becoming the first openly gay candidate elected to public office in the South Texas town of Del Rio. Read this story online at HISPANIC Network Magazine here.

With sections dedicated to the topics of business, careers, education, entertainment, events, finance, government, health, Hispanic lifestyle and technology, this hispanic magazine provides the latest, most important diversity news, covering virtually every industry, business and profession. This includes up-to-date statistics on workforce diversity, as well as business-to-business trends.

In addition to the latest news and human interest stories that impact the Hispanic community, we offer both recruitment and business opportunities, along with accurate, timely conferences and event calendars.

HISPANIC Network Magazine (HNM) serves as a hub for content that highlights and celebrates the minority community so that those who identify with this population feel supported in their professional and personal endeavors. As a Hispanic American most can appreciate the difficulties their family has endured and most recognize that their experience has molded them into the person they are today.

Latino magazines like HNM understand the importance of community and are proud to spotlight inspiring role models and notable mentors. These are the stories that are going to empower others to create the legacy of diversity and inclusion that HNM stands for.

How to Stand Out on the Job

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Workplaces can be extremely competitive! It can be tempting to rely on gimmicks like flashy clothes or jokes to stand out at work, but this can backfire if you’re looking for a promotion. If you want to get noticed by your superiors at work, the best way to stand out is to conform to your workplace, do quality work, and be a good colleague.

Why Work on Getting Noticed?

You might be the hardest worker in your organization, and the one everyone wants on their team—but, if you’re not in people’s thoughts, then you’ll be passed up for new projects, additional responsibilities, awards, and promotions.

That’s why you need to be visible at work!

Let’s look at some strategies that you can use to get noticed in the workplace.

Developing Specialist Skills

Do you consider yourself a “generalist,” someone who does many different things in different roles, or a “specialist,” someone who is an expert in one or two specific areas?

New businesses often hire generalists, because they can perform in so many different roles. As organizations grow, however, specialists are often hired to focus on key areas. This may leave the hard-working generalists feeling pushed aside and disempowered.

If you’re a generalist, think strategically about what types of skills your organization needs. Work on building these skills to become a specialist. The more knowledgeable and skillful you become in a particular area, the more likely you are to be noticed for your work.

Remember that organizations also tend to look for people with great “soft skills”—non-technical skills such as creative thinking, emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, communication skills, flexibility, and coaching. These are often as important as professional expertise.

If you’re thinking about becoming a specialist in a certain area, don’t forget to consider these important soft skills. Helping your boss resolve a major conflict within your team will get you noticed just as much as delivering a great presentation or sales report.

Essentially, if you help people out when they need assistance, then people will help you out too.

And if you take the time to build and nurture relationships with the people around you, you’ll build a network of “allies” who can help you get assigned to interesting, significant, or eye-catching projects that might otherwise go to someone else. They may also recommend you to other departments, which can open up opportunities that might not have been available to you without their recommendations.

Build a network of alliances within your department, with other departments, and with the executive team or board. Try to get assigned to teams that involve a wide variety of people. This can help you build your reputation and make important friendships.

Also, build your network outside of office hours. Socializing with colleagues after work often makes everyone feel more relaxed and open to new friendships.

Tracking Your Accomplishments

When you’re working hard, it’s easy to forget all of your achievements over the last 6 to 12 months. This won’t help when it’s time for your performance review.

Keep track of all of your accomplishments within the organization. If clients or colleagues give you compliments, write them down. If the compliment came in an email, print it. If you exceeded last quarter’s sales goals, get the paperwork that proves it.

Put all of these great compliments and achievements in a file and bring the file to your performance review. This gives you hard evidence to prove to your boss what a great job you’re doing. Then, when it’s time to ask for a pay raise or promotion, it may be harder for your manager to say no.

Getting Out of the Shadows

Sometimes, whether intentionally or unintentionally, your manager or colleagues may present your ideas as their own.

However, if you want to get noticed, you must receive credit for your ideas.

If this happens to you, first find out if it’s also happening to anyone else. Often, a colleague or boss “borrows” ideas from several people, not just one. One way to discover this is by simply watching other people’s body language around this person.

If your colleague or manager is taking credit for only your work, but no one else’s, then document it every time it occurs. If practical, “watermark” your work whenever you can (this is a feature in some word processing software packages). If the person claims your ideas as their own in a meeting, gently but firmly correct the misstatement.

Taking on More Responsibilities

You can also get noticed by your manager and other executives by taking on more responsibilities whenever possible.

This doesn’t mean that you should overwork yourself! But if you see a new project or role that will help you expand your skills, take advantage of it. Do this, particularly if it’s one that has high visibility within the organization or has a significant impact on the bottom line.

This is particularly important with innovation and process improvement. Developing a reputation as an innovator or creative thinker can be valuable. If you believe that you have the ability to innovate and think of good ideas then try to get assigned to projects where these skills are valued.

Tip: While you’re doing this, make sure that you continue to do the core parts of your job well. If you fail to do this, you’ll get noticed—but for all the wrong reasons!

More Tips on Getting Noticed

Here are a few more ideas for getting the people you work with to notice you:

  • Make sure you’re visible. Spend a few minutes every day greeting and talking with your coworkers. A simple smile can help tremendously. Also, try to speak to colleagues face-to-face from time to time, instead of sending emails or instant messages.
  • Praise others. If you have a colleague who works as hard as you, then praise the person in front of your manager. Be specific, and sincere, about what the person is doing.
  • Stay updated on your industry. Read trade newsletters or other relevant materials that keep you up-to-date on trends and technology. You never know when this information will be valuable.
  • Find a mentor. Mentors can offer valuable advice and career coaching. The chances are that the mentor has been through the same situations that you’re experiencing and can help you navigate them successfully.
  • Get involved with your organization’s charity events. Volunteering for these activities—like running in a race or coaching a children’s team—can help you build your network within the organization.

Source: mindtools.com

This Latina VP Believes This One Trick Will Help Build A Diverse Pipeline

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Carly Sanchez has led with a people first mindset since the beginning of her career in higher education, now as the Executive Vice President and Head of Talent Acquisition Strategy and Delivery at Wells Fargo she is able to scale her impact.

“[My role] encompasses the leadership of all team member hiring globally for positions across Wells Fargo at all levels, with an emphasis on targeted recruiting for diverse segments,” explains Sanchez. “I serve as the primary liaison to the Chief Diversity Officer for all human capital diversity issues.”

As a Latina, Sanchez understands the impact of having the right structures in place that would help facilitate not only the hiring of a diverse talent pool, but also its retention.

“I think it is critical for Latinas to serve as sponsors and actively engage in identifying and sponsoring talent for positions to advance careers of those coming through the ranks,” shares Sanchez.

The goal is to ensure that those who are talented and qualified have the opportunity to walk through the right doors and feel like they belong.

“I gain the greatest satisfaction from helping identify diverse talent and enabling their future path through education as an admissions officer and now through facilitating opportunities for career advancement through recruiting, hiring and D&I work,” says Sanchez.

Below Sanchez shares more about her day-to-day work, what her hopes are for Latina peer mentorship, and her advice to all who are navigating corporate ladders.

Vivian Nunez: How would you define your career’s mission and how do you implement it on a day to day? 

Carly Sanchez: My career mission is to optimize opportunities for talented individuals that will allow and enable them to maximize that talent in an environment that is conducive and values a diversity of perspectives and backgrounds. On a day to day level, my role now is less focused on individual positions for which we are hiring (although I still do stay involved in that) and now more focused on designing a strategy and organizational structure that will enable the businesses and functions at Wells Fargo to attract and promote the best most diverse mix of talent to support the work.

Nunez: How do you ensure that hiring is as diverse as possible? 

Sanchez: Outreach and sourcing of diverse talent pools is critical, building the pipelines in advance of the opening of a position. This enables us to build diverse candidate slates for review and increases opportunities for selection in an equitable process. Our team partners with many diversity focused organizations to build talent pools, targets potential sources of talent (for example, working with military bases for hiring of transitioning military etc.), partners with HR partners and hiring managers to identify where we may have greater opportunity to increase diversity at all levels of the organization, and consults on issues related to D&I including how Unconscious Bias can negatively impact our commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce.

Nunez: What advice do you have for Latinas who are looking to break into spaces that are predominantly white? 

Sanchez: Mentoring and sponsorship can be critical as Latinas look to bring their talent to different challenging environments.  Identifying individuals who can help you learn more about the role and meet individuals working in these organizations is ideal. It is also important to research and educate oneself about the organization, including developing a detailed understanding of the mission, the day to day work and any available information on the organization. This demonstrates your true interest and commitment when you have an opportunity to connect.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Cliché Answers to the Most Common Interview Questions

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Hispanic Businesswoman

By Brianna Flavin

The internet offers a massive amount of job interview advice, sample questions and potential responses. When you are trying to land a job, it’s easy to devour this advice in bulk, but that might actually be more detrimental to your career than you realize.

What’s resulted is hiring managers hearing the same cliché responses over and over again. When your objective is to learn about applicants to determine if they will be a good fit for the position, and they all say their biggest flaw is “perfectionism,” it’s frustrating, to say the least.

As a job seeker, you want to do your homework and come to the interview prepared to answer the most common interview questions. But how can you avoid sounding like an echo of every other candidate?

“The preferred response to any question is one that is honest and upfront,” says staffing and onboarding coach Jen Teague. Ideally, your circumstances, interests and aspirations will factor into every answer, leaving your interviewer with a clear and accurate impression of who you are.

To get you started in the right direction—and to help you steer clear of some responses that could leave a bad impression—we asked hiring managers to share the most cliché answers they encounter when interviewing job candidates. See what the folks in the hiring seats are sick of hearing and their advice on how to craft a more impressive response.

  1. Why would you excel at this job?

What NOT to say: “I like working with people.”

“This is one of the most robotic answers a candidate could provide,” according to Beth Tucker, CEO of KNF&T Staffing Resources. She says though it might seem like a friendly answer, it doesn’t actually reveal anything about you as a person or employee.

“Most people like to work with other people,” Tucker explains. “Instead of saying this, try thinking of the core message you’re trying to communicate.” Are you an especially strong communicator? Do you work harder when you’re collaborating with coworkers on a project? Do you enjoy delegating responsibility?

“You’re much better off giving an example that demonstrates your abilities,” Tucker says.

A better approach: Talk about a team project where you interacted with a diverse group of people—or difficult people. This will have a much bigger impact and make a better impression on the interviewer.

  1. What do you know about our company?

What NOT to say: “Not much. I was hoping you could tell me.”

“This answer highlights your lack of initiative and preparation,” says Mike Smith, founder of SalesCoaching1. He urges to always do your research on any company you are interviewing with and come prepared to dazzle.

A better approach: Smith suggests a statement that displays what you understand about the company and what you might still want clarification on. An example is, “I found your annual report and noticed your company has grown your market share and is opening other branches. What is the next location planned?”

  1. Why do you want to be in this business?

What NOT to say: “It looks like a cool company to work for.”

This vague enthusiasm also reveals a lack of research. Smith says experienced interviewers hear this same answer time and time again. Why would you prefer to work for this company, rather than some of their competitors? Even if you do plan to interview at both companies, you are better off being specific.

A better approach: “I have done a lot of research in this marketplace. Your company and your competitors (name them) are in the fastest growing sector. I want to be a part of that growth.”

  1. Why did you apply for this position?

What NOT to say: “I want to get my career started.”

“The worst cliché answer I receive is something along the lines of, ‘I’m not picky about my position; I just want a chance to work,’” says Shell Harris, President of Big Oak Studios Inc. He says this kind of answer typically comes from the mouths of college graduates having difficulty landing their first job.

“When I hear this response, I am thinking this person is desperate to work and will say anything to get any job, even a job they may not like,” Harris says. He adds that this is often an indicator that the candidate will continue job searching even if he or she does land the position. He believes applicants who have specific expectations about what kind of work they will do in the company come off much better.

“It tells me they understand what we do, how they can help and, most importantly, that they want to be a part of the company,” Harris says. “Sure, I believe they want to work, but they aren’t being honest with me or themselves if they say they’ll take any job.”

A better approach: Talk about what the role you’re applying for does for you. Could it help you develop a skill you’re hoping to sharpen? Does it align with your strengths or expertise? What excites you about the position?

  1. What is your biggest weakness as an employee?

What NOT to say: “I’m a perfectionist.”

This is one of the biggest clichés out there in interviewing world. “The age-old advice about spinning any negative about yourself into a positive only works when it’s specific,” says Gail Abelman, recruiter at Staffing Perfection.

“I can’t tell you the number of times I have heard people tell me, ‘I’m a perfectionist,’ or ‘I’m too honest,’” she says. “These are about as cliché and phony as it gets.”

“You can tell immediately when people are not being genuine,” says Rebecca Baggett, Director of Human Resources at Bigger Pockets. She says responses like ‘I’m a perfectionist’ or ‘I’m too loyal’ really communicate either a lack of honesty or a lack of self-awareness. “I always appreciate when a candidate says, ‘I messed up and this is how I corrected the situation,’” she says.

Ableman advises telling a story to answer this kind of question. It will sound more personal and realistic, and you will provide your interviewer with a better picture of who you are and what it will be like to hire you.

A better approach: Describe an issue you experienced at a previous job, the problem you had solving it and the steps you took to ultimately overcome it.

  1. What are your long-term goals?

What NOT to say: “I want to move up within the company.”

Advancement might seem like the only right answer to give to this question, but thinking of your goals in terms of a one line track to the top is actually rather limiting. Teague says personal goals as well as professional goals can play into your answer here, particularly if they could intersect (i.e., Wanting to learn another language).

Once again, get specific. Your interviewer wants to know what motivates you. Try to think beyond a larger paycheck and detail some goals that make you excited about what you do.

A better approach: Explain that you’re motivated to advance as a professional, and list some particular goals you’d like to achieve (both personal and professional).

  1. Do you have any questions for me?

What NOT to say: “No, I think you covered them all.”

This answer if often on the tip of everyone’s jittery tongue at the close of an interview, but it reveals no preparation or willingness to research the industry, according to Smith. As this is often the question that will conclude the interview, your response has the potential to leave a particularly lasting impression.

Smith suggests thanking interviewers for what they did cover and offering at least one, in-depth question. You can riff off something they already mentioned in the interview or bring up something you found in your research. “This shows a business maturity and a professional approach,” Smith adds.

A better approach: Ask about a recent announcement you encountered in your research or ask the interviewer about what brought them to the company.

About Rasmussen College

Rasmussen College is a regionally accredited private college that is dedicated to changing lives and the communities it serves through high-demand and flexible educational programs. Since 1900, the College has been committed to academic innovation and empowering students to pursue a college degree. Rasmussen College offers certificate and diploma programs through associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in seven schools of study including business, health sciences, nursing, technology, design, education and justice studies.

Source: Rasmussen.edu