Telemundo Launches Major National Hispanic Heritage Month Campaign

LinkedIn

Telemundo announces the launch of #NuestroOrgullo, a national campaign celebrating culture, traditions and contributions of Latinos in the United States during Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15­–October 15).

Under the banner of its award-winning corporate social responsibility initiative, “El Poder En Ti” (The Power in You), the company-wide campaign will feature Telemundo national and local talent in a series of public service announcements that encourages Latinos to take pride in and celebrate their heritage. Additionally the campaign will include weekly in-show segments across network shows and daily digital and social content that highlight cultural pride and moments of inspiration. The campaign will also spotlight Hispanic industry leaders and community partners.

“Today, at 57 million strong and with $1.7 trillion in buying power, Hispanics don’t just have a voice, this community has the strength of a nation,” said Cesar Conde, Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises. “During Hispanic Heritage Month, we are proud to celebrate our Latino heritage and contributions as this valuable community continues to fuel America’s economy across all sectors in our country.”

The campaign will feature a series of custom on-air public service announcements featuring Telemundo talent, including Rafael Amaya, Maria Celeste Arraras, Andres Cantor, Jose Diaz-Balart, Ana Maria Polo, Don Francisco, and Carlos Ponce, among many others. In addition, the network will air a series of weekly segments and special reports across network shows including “Al Rojo Vivo,” “Un Nuevo Dia,” “Suelta La Sopa,” “Titulares y Mas,” “Enfoque” and “Noticias Telemundo.”

Online, the campaign will offer daily videos and informative content throughout the month, featuring music artists and Telemundo talent and highlights of Latino icons, across all Telemundo social accounts and on www.telemundo.com/NuestroOrgullo. The network will also roll out a series of “Draw My Life” videos in Spanish and English that will introduce Hispanic Heritage Month and its history, and share life stories of notable Hispanic leaders from a variety of sectors and countries. Viewers can follow the campaign’s activities on social media via the #NuestroOrgullo hashtag and share why they are proud to be Latino.

In addition to partnering with national and local community organizations across the country, the company is partnering with Google on the launch of Google Arts & Culture: Latino Cultures in the U.S., an innovative online collection highlighting Latino contributions to U.S. history, arts and culture.

This is the first time an online collection features in one place such wide-ranging number of cultural institutions to preserve and celebrate U.S. Latino art, culture and history. This Google Arts & Culture project was built in partnership with 50 non-profit institutions contributing a rich set of over 4,300 archives, artworks and stories accessible to everyone, everywhere.

The online collection will include educational tools in English and in Spanish as well as virtual tours of historic sites like landmarks of early Spanish settlements in the U.S., key murals in Los Angeles or walk through the streets of Little Havana in Miami. Telemundo and Google will host a series of regional events with local community leaders in New York, Los Angeles and Chicago to celebrate the Latino experience in the U.S.

About NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises:
NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises is a world-class media company leading the industry in the production and distribution of high-quality Spanish-language content to U.S. Hispanics and audiences around the world. This fast-growing multiplatform portfolio is comprised of the Telemundo Network and Station Group, Telemundo Deportes, Telemundo Studios, Telemundo Internacional, Telemundo International Studios, Universo, and a Digital Enterprises & Emerging Business unit. Telemundo Network features original Spanish-language entertainment, news and sports content reaching 94% of U.S. Hispanic TV households in 210 markets through 17 owned stations, 55 affiliates and its national feed.  Telemundo also owns WKAQ, a television station that serves viewers in Puerto Rico.  Telemundo Deportes is the designated Spanish-language home of two of the world’s most popular sporting events: FIFA World Cup™ through 2026 and the Summer Olympic Games through 2032.  As the #1 media company reaching Hispanics and millennials online, the Digital Enterprises & Emerging Business unit distributes original content across multiple platforms, maximizing its exclusive partnerships with properties such as Buzzfeed, Vox, and Snapchat. Through Telemundo Internacional, the largest U.S.-based distributor of Spanish-language content in the world; Telemundo International Studios, a production unit focused on creating high-end short form, scripted formats for international markets; and Universo, the fastest growing Hispanic entertainment cable network, the company reflects the diverse lifestyle, cultural experience and language of its expanding audience. NBCUniversal Telemundo Enterprises is a division of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast Corporation.

Source:  Telemundo

A Latina Google Strategist’s Views On Authenticity, Embracing Your Identity And The Power Of Instagram

LinkedIn

Dannie Fountain is known as a builder, whether she’s rebuilding her own identity or building a brand, she has a reputation for how tightly she can weave a story that just feels right.

While the skill set was there during her teenage years it was her freshman year of college that challenged her ability to put them to the test.

“I was adopted at 16, changing my identity all over again, and removing my ability to access the historical information that had been shared, because I no longer had access to their source – my mother’s anecdotal nuggets,” explains Fountain. “My identity changed once again during my freshman year of college. Through some health-related decisions, tough conversations, and a DNA test, I discovered that the wholly-British descent I’d been raised to understand was actually pretty off.”

The unexpected medical tests led to Fountain discovering that she was Latinx and deciding to melt into an identity that had always belonged to her.

Now as a strategist at Google and as an independent marketing consultant, Fountain uses her storytelling skills to support brands and their larger missions.

Below she shares how she champions inclusivity in all the spaces she inhabits, what advice she has for other Latinxs, and how she balances both her corporate job and side hustles.

Vivian Nunez: What made you join the team at Google in addition to working for yourself? 

Dannie Fountain: Truthfully, I wasn’t looking for a job when the Google opportunity happened. I was surviving (nay, thriving) in the rollercoaster of “feast and famine” that is entrepreneurship and I truly was in love with my life. When the Google opportunity first cropped up in my inbox, my reaction was one of imposter syndrome – who am I to believe I’m important/talented/brave/strong/cool enough to pursue an opportunity like this? But Google has this kind of kinetic power, one that won’t let you say no. So I pursued it, and the more I pursued it, the more I fell in love. Now, nine months later, I can truly smile when I say Google is my corporate home and the first place I’ve ever worked where I’ve unapologetically brought my whole self to work every single day. 

Nunez: How have you navigated the transition to an in-house, full-time job? 

Fountain: I’ve always been a “side hustler” in some form of the word – whether it was running my marketing consulting firm while in college or running my second business while maintaining my first. But this transition from freelancing to working at Google was an interesting one. Before I came to Google, I was on the road nearly 24/7 for speaking engagements and work. Not only was I coming back into a space where I had a boss again, but I also was going to have an apartment of my own for the first time in nearly 2 years.

The transition was smoother than expected in some ways (i.e. I have fallen in love with having a commute again) and harder in others (I didn’t actually stop traveling as much and so I still feel like I’m on the road all the time). Having coworkers and the resources to do all the things I’ve dreamed of doing is incredible – I love the opportunity for casual collision that sparks these moments of innovation that profoundly change the way I think about marketing. I’m beyond grateful for the access and opportunity I’ve gotten in the nine months I’ve been at Google. But at the end of the day, I’m a Googler and still a freelancer, so really not much has changed.

Nunez: How important is it for you that others understand that you are proudly Latina?

Fountain: In some ways, I feel so much shame for identifying as Latina. My grasp on culture and history is limited. My grasp on language is weak. My appearance is that of a white woman. It took me taking an actual DNA test and seeing the results with my own eyes before I’d actually start checking the “hispanic or latino” box on things, let alone verbally speaking that identity aloud.

But I also recognize my privilege. I know that I have the power to walk into a room and be presumed white and there is so much responsibility in that presumption. There’s this profound sense of urgency to make it unequivocally clear that [Latinx] is who I am, all in, 100%

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Estadio Azteca: The only stadium to have three World Cups now Mexico will co-host 2026

LinkedIn

A legendary football stadium, symbol of pride for Mexican fans, a gathering ground every fortnight for all walks of life: this is Estadio Azteca. A behemoth that will play host to an unprecedented third World Cup in 2026. Over the past 50 years it has been home to some of the greatest national and global sporting events.

EARLY BEGINNINGS

Designed by architects Pedro Ramirez Vazquez and Rafael Mijares, the stadium was brought to life on communal land in the suburb of Santa Ursula Coapa. Construction started in August 1962 and was completed in 1966. It took more than 800 workers, seven million hours of labour, 100 tonnes of concrete and 8,000 thousand tonnes of steel rods to erect the structure.

The title “Estadio Azteca” was given by Antonio Vazques and was also voted best name by the fans. The stadium eventually opened its doors to the public on May 29, 1966. The first event to be held at the stadium was a friendly match between local Club America and Italian side Torino. 105,000 spectators filled the stands to celebrate the first goal which was scored by Arlindo Dos Santos within the first 10 minutes.

A RICH HISTORY

Over the past five decades, millions of fans have witnessed extraordinary achievements at this venue. The stadium hosted World Cup finals in 1970 and 1986 and crowned two of the greatest footballers of all times: Pele and Maradona.

In 1970, “The King” claimed his third World Cup title with Brazil alongside Rivelino, Tostao, Gerson and Jairzinho, while 16 years later Maradona would make headlines for Argentina with his ‘”Hand of God” goal as well as the famed ‘”Goal of the Century” in the same match against England.

Some of the greatest moments in Estadio Azteca include ‘”the Match of the Century” between Italy and Germany, featuring Franz Beckenbauer with a strapped arm who made it through to the semifinals.

The Mexico national team have also seen their heroes lift trophies and create unforgettable moments. Manuel Negrete scored the best goal of 1986 with his ‘scissor-kick from the penalty spot; the team were victorious in the 1999 Confederations Cup, as well as the Gold Cup of the same year, and the under-17 team won the U17 World Cup in 2011. In addition, it was home to matches played at the 1968 Olympic Games.

It is currently the home ground of Club America, but has also been home to other clubs in the past, such as Cruz Azul, Necaxa, Atletico Espanol and Atlante. It has played host to 33 Mexican football finals, which have included some of the best matches witnessed by football fans in the stadium. The most recent of these was at the 2014 Clausura championships where Aguilas was victorious over Tigres.

A NAME CHANGE

In 1997, the stadium’s name was changed to “Guillermo Canedo,” a posthumous homage to the president of Club America and CONCACAF.

However, the original “Estadio Azteca” was very much ingrained and fans struggled to adopt the new name. So the preference of Televisa — the owners of the stadium — was shortlived, the public insisted on calling it Estadio Azteca and soon after the stadium got its original name back.

IMPACT OUTSIDE SOCCER

The Azteca is not only an inspiration to the sporting world, it has also been an inspiration to artists. Andres Calamaro was amazed and surprised by the structure and composed the song “Estadio Azteca” with these words: “When I was a boy and I met the Estadio Azteca, I was stupefied, I felt small in the presence of the giant, when I was older the same happened again…”

This inspiration was also felt by Michael Jackson, the King of Pop, who broke the attendance record in 1993 when 600,000 people came to watch his “Dangerous” world tour over the course of five days.

American football has also left its mark. After multiple preseason matches in Mexico City, Estadio Azteca eventually opened its doors on Oct. 2, 2005 to an encounter between the San Francisco 49ers and Arizona Cardinals. This was the first regular season NFL league match in history that was played outside of the United States and attracted a record crowd of 103,467.

Eleven years later an encounter between Houston Texans and Raiders was the first “Monday Night Football” match to be played in a foreign country in the history of the league, and the second regular season league match to be played in Mexico. 76,743 people attended the game.

In 2017, the third regular season league match was played in the Azteca when Patriots beat Raiders — the first time an NFL title holder had played in Mexico. The Azteca has also been host to other American football matches, such as the American Bowl in 1994, 1997, 1998 and 2000. The first of these matches attracted 112,000 spectators who came to see the Dallas Cowboys take on the Houston Oilers. But the greatest event to be hosted by the stadium took place on Feb. 20, 1993. The legendary Mexican boxer Julio Cesar Chavez beat Greg Haugen from the United States in front of a record crowd of 132,274.

Continue onto ESPN to read the complete article.

How Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez Pulled Off an Ambitious Anthology Raising Money for Puerto Rico

LinkedIn

When Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico on September 2017, many living on the mainland struggled to connect with their loved ones. Power was knocked out across the entire island, making communication challenging. Even the hotline the Puerto Rican government set up to provide information to worried friends and family proved ineffective. People received a busy tone because of the sheer volume of callers. But as they desperately looked for news – many turning to social media, where others relayed the little information they knew – they were forced to carry on living their lives outside the island. That’s how Edgardo Miranda-Rodriguez found himself at New York Comic Contwo weeks after the storm, a time when folks still had no idea about the severity of the effects. While there to talk to fans about his work and his original comic book character, La Borinqueña, an Afro-Boricua superhero, his corner of Artist’s Alley turned into a sort of therapy session.

“There was a line of like 50 people waiting for me every day, the four days of the event,” Miranda-Rodriguez tells me on the telephone. “But more than anything, the space became a very special place for people to share, ’cause up until that point, many of us still had not heard from our family or friends or anyone from Puerto Rico. Not only were people not able to communicate with one another on the island, but we weren’t able to communicate from here to the island. So many people came to the table, they saw the image of La Borinqueña; it gave them a sense of optimism. But at the same time, many of them were overwhelmed emotionally, crying, asking me about my family. I cried; there was a lot of hugging happening.”

The tearful meetups also became the genesis of one of Edgardo’s most ambitious projects: Ricanstruction: Reminiscing and Rebuilding Puerto Rico, an anthology raising money for recovery efforts, which featured about 150 collaborators. The book made its debut on May 29, 2018, but it was at NYCC that set this 192-page anthology in motion. Dan DiDio – the co-publisher of DC Comics – and S.O. Leilani Ramos Lugo lined up to get a chance to speak to Edgardo. When Dan came face to face with Edgardo, the first thing the Nuyorican creative said was, “What are we going to do for Puerto Rico?” DiDio asked Miranda-Rodriguez to put together a proposal.

“As soon as he left – within minutes – I came up with the term Ricanstruction Reminiscing and Rebuilding Puerto Rico,” he adds. Soon after, he diligently worked to make this idea a reality.

One of the most noteworthy parts of Ricanstruction is the number of famous names attached to the project. Rosario Dawson, Sonia Manzano, Javier Munoz, Ruben Blades, and more created content for the book. Some, like Rosario Dawson, he persuaded to create a comic.

Continue onto Remezcla to read the complete article.

Hulu Is Turning Isabel Allende’s ‘The House of the Spirits’ Into a Series

LinkedIn

hilean author Isabel Allende is far more than Jane the Virgin‘s favorite writer. Allende is an internationally acclaimed, best-selling author whose works are landmark titles in literature. Seriously, when Allende speaks, you all should listen. Hulu is definitely listening because after a supposedly contentious bidding war they’ve announced plans to adapt Allende’s 1982 novel The House of the Spirits into a TV series.

Allende will serve as executive producer on the series as the company starts the process of finding a screenwriter and director. The House of the Spirits is a multi-generational tale following the Truebas, a Chilean family that goes from rags to riches in their quest for love, money, and power. Along the way the family encounters elements of magical realism. Hollywood’s taken a stab at adapting the novel before. In 1993, director Billie August’s adaptation of the novel was released to theaters starring a non-Latino cast including Jeremy Irons, Meryl Streep, and Winona Ryder as the Truebas. The film was critically and commercially unsuccessful.

The House of the Spirits is definitely in need of another adaptation. The 1993 version is laughably bad, with Jeremy Irons in brownface making no attempt at covering his English accent. Streep and Ryder are as lily white as they come in their performances, and the only Spanish-speaking actors in the bunch, Antonio Banderas and María Conchita Alonso, stick out like a sore thumb. It’d be fantastic for this new take to actually get a Latino writer and director, if only to truly allow Allende’s magical realism and historical grandiosity to come through. The House of the Spirits is a sweeping novel that could benefit from a long-form television series, as opposed to a two-hour movie.

Continue onto Remezcla to read the complete article.

How This Latina Brought Her Dream For Quiero — A Latinx Talk Show — To Life

LinkedIn

The conversations on QUIERO the Show, a Latinx talk show web series, are centered on the Latinx experience. Priscilla Garcia Jacquier sits opposite her guests, the likes of Alexander Dinelaris, Emma Ramos, and Michelle Veintimilla, as she builds a conversation on their experiences pursuing their truest passions.

“The show is about tools for success, so I like to think through people’s lives and how their experience could help other people,” explains Garcia-Jacquier. “Sometimes that means that they’re at the top of the game, sometimes that means that they’re just starting out, but their hustle is on point.”

The series has a complete first season with 10 episodes currently available on YouTube with plans to film season 2 this summer in Los Angeles.

“It became clear that I wanted to build a platform that would both help people’s hearts and also give them the tools necessary for success — LatinX success,” shares Garcia-Jacquier. “LatinX hunger gets confused into a sort of ‘grateful immigrant’ narrative that I have really become tired of. No, we’re not here working away our gratitude every day and thanking the borders for letting us through in humble submission. We are here to build, to create, to empower, and honestly, to have an economic impact.”

Quiero’s first season is the result of hustle and pure determination — filmed in Garcia-Jacquier’s New York City bedroom with equipment her and her team already owned. Season 2 is a dream supported by a community of individuals who supported their Kickstarter campaign and understood the vision, and the need, for a series like Quiero.

“As an entrepreneur, I’ve learned it’s going to take time and that I have to make direct asks,” shares Garcia-Jacquier. “Somehow, I’ve approached a lot of exchanges surrendering my instinct and allowing others’ expertise to overpower my gut. I’m learning that I need to follow my instincts and be very direct in the asks that it requires. It’s the only way that people meet you halfway.”

Below Garcia-Jacquier shares the behind-the-scenes of building a web series, leaving behind her 9-to-5 for her own passion project, and the advice she has for Latinx.

Vivian Nunez: When did you know it was time to quit your job to focus on your passion projects? 

Priscila Garcia-Jacquier:I have been assisting at the highest levels of entertainment since I was 19. My mentors’ projects have always been the most important tasks for me and I took to their lives as if they were my own. That’s what you’re supposed to do, that’s what being a Hollywood assistant means— that’s how you learn and absorb. I have loved every step of the way. However, this year, it became increasingly difficult to leave my projects at home, even for the day. I felt a pull to prioritize them, to prioritize myself. I think some people do figure out a way to work and apprentice and still go home to their projects with their whole heart. I admire those people. That was not the case for me. If someone else’s project is in front of me, I will completely surrender into it. It’s easy to lose sight of the importance of your own script when the one at work stars a major celebrity. I’m 26 now and I wasn’t okay with that anymore. I realized that the only way to really create a boundary for myself was to start working for me.

Nunez: What inspired Quiero? 

Garcia-Jacquier: A year ago, I was feeling stuck and frustrated. I felt bogged down by the work I wasn’t creating and felt pressured to produce. I sat down with myself and I thought— what can I produce right now? What can I bring my team together to start making tomorrow? In the meantime, I was really thinking about the things that actually interested me and how I actually liked to spend my time. It turns out that I’ve always been a self-help junky and consume the medium relentlessly. Lewis Howes, Marie Forleo, Gabby Bernstein, Oprah, are all people whose content I invest in and whose lessons I apply. I allowed myself to start thinking about it— what if this isn’t just your hobby? What if part of your interest is that you want to… do that? I sat down with my EP and kind of whispered this crazy idea to her that I wanted to start my own talkshow. That my favorite part of any job is always the connection. Who will have a meaningful impact on my life next?

Nunez: Why do you think a show like Quiero is necessary? 

Garcia-Jacquier: I made Quiero because I needed Quiero. Quiero is my way to fight the harmful narratives about LatinX that have arisen from our current political climate. But Quiero is also my way of learning about the community— we’re very misunderstood, both inside and outside of the community. We all come from different countries, with different cultures, and very different Spanishes, and then we arrive here and are expected to be the same. Not to mention that my experience as an LatinX immigrant differs greatly from someone who is first, second, or third generation. We have to be open in saying that we are here and we are building a new culture. To be Latino American is a new and different thing. I’m curious about that thing, I want to partake in building what that means— but we have to be open about it, all while highlighting our success. That’s Quiero.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Latinos are moviegoers, so ‘Selena’ producer brings theater to iconic Hispanic town

LinkedIn

Delano, Calif. is the birthplace of the farm worker movement. A veteran Chicano Hollywood producer thought it was time it had a multiplex.

Moctesuma Esparza has by all accounts lived the American Dream. A kid who grew up in East Los Angeles during the tumultuous times of the Chicano civil rights movement in the sixties and seventies, Esparza has spent his career highlighting the Latino experience through film. The Emmy winning and Oscar nominated movie producer —he was one of the producers of the hit movie Selena as well as The Milagro Beanfield War and Gettysburg, Esparza has expanded his efforts by bringing the movie going experience to several Latino communities.

“When I grew up I could walk to three movie theaters, but today Latinos have to drive a far distance to see a movie. I want to make movies a neighborhood event,” said Esparza in a telephone interview with NBC News.

The owner and CEO of Maya Cinemas, Esparza opened his latest theater in Delano, California on May 16th, a $20 million dollar multiplex in the heart of the Central Valley. Before the theater’s opening, the agricultural city of just over 50 thousand residents had no movie theater; families would have had to drive over a half hour to go see a movie.

Delano holds significant symbolic value for Esparza’s target audience of Latino families. Delano was the epicenter of the farm workers movement, where civil rights activist Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta joined workers in a strike against grape growers. The historic event set into motion the establishment of the United Farm Workers union.

The farm workers movement is emblematic of Esparza’s own experiences growing up. As a youth leader at Lincoln High School in El Sereno, a working-class, Latino enclave in Los Angeles, Esparza helped organize a massive student walkout in protest for equal education and school reform in in 1968. Frustrated by the lack of opportunities, Esparza sought to transform the presence of Latinos in cinema, entering UCLA and getting a degree in the School of Theater, Film and Television.

Esparza used his experiences as an activist and his degree to tell the story of his community through film. His first documentary, Requiem 29,chronicled the life of Rubén Salazar, the first Mexican American journalist employed by the Los Angeles Times who became an journalist-activist and was killed by a gas canister shot by sheriff deputies while dispersing a crowd of Chicano protesters who organized against the Vietnam War.

After decades of film making and activism, Esparza conceived and launched Maya Cinemas in 2003, and with the newest one in Delano, it now has theaters in five California agricultural and industrial cities with large Latino populations: Bakersfield, Pittsburg, Fresno, Salinas and Delano. Esparza plans to expand to other cities across the country where Hispanics make up a large share of the population.

Though movie going in general is in decline, Esparza has leveraged the economic power of the Latino movie going audience. According to the Motion Picture Association of America, “Latinos, who represent 18% of the total U.S. population, comprised 24% of ‘frequent’ moviegoers — those who attend at least once a month.” According to their report, Latinos went to the moves an average of 4.5 times in 2017, making them the most enthusiastic movie going ethnic group in the country.

Continue onto NBC News to read the complete article.

16-Year-Old Actor Xolo Maridueña Is the First Latino ‘Karate Kid’

LinkedIn

Although nostalgia enthusiasts were excited to see original actors Ralph Macchio and William Zabka recently reprise their roles as Daniel LaRusso and Johnny Lawrence on YouTube Red’s Cobra Kai, there’s no denying how much heart and talent the younger cast members have added to the new series based on The Karate Kid.

Leading the latest group of martial arts trainees in the resurrected franchise is 16-year-old actor Xolo Maridueña, who portrays main character Miguel Diaz. On the show, Miguel is the first novice karate student Johnny takes in to train when he decides to resurrect the Cobra Kai brand by opening his own dojo under the same name and taking on the role of sensei. Johnny meets Miguel when he saves him from a group of bullies outside of the strip mall where the dojo is located.

Miguel is a nice enough kid who lives with his loving mother and grandmother. We don’t know too much about his father except that he stayed behind in Ecuador and might’ve been caught up in something shady. Miguel’s mother describes him as a “very bad man.” In Johnny, Miguel finds the father figure that he’s always wanted.

Along with his new interest in martial arts, Miguel has his sights set on making an impression on a girl at school – Samantha LaRusso (Mary Mouser), who happens to be Daniel’s daughter. As the 10-episode season progresses, Miguel becomes closer to Samantha, although her father has no idea that he is Johnny’s student, which Samantha knows would not be welcomed news in the LaRusso household. While that drama plays out, Miguel finds a new foe in Robby Keene (Tanner Buchanan), Johnny’s estranged teenage son who happens to work for Daniel at his car dealership and begins a friendship with Samantha while under Daniel’s tutelage.

Continue onto Remezcla to read the complete article.

Lime is the first bike share to reach a Native American community

LinkedIn
up close picture of lime bike logo on a basket of bicycle

Over 119 bike-share systems now exist across America, and with the rise of dockless bikes, more and more communities are gaining access to these crucial mobility tools. But if you look at the map, you’ll see that the spread of bike-share services has left out an entire population: the more than 570 Native American tribes in the United States.

Today, Lime (formerly known as LimeBike) took the first step toward providing access for a Native American territory. The dockless bike-share company will launch in the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, as part of a larger northern Nevada regional partnership that will also bring bikes to the University of Nevada, Reno and a handful of cities. The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony is situated not too far outside the cities of Reno and Sparks, and tribal leaders told Lime that they’re looking forward to the opportunity to reduce automobile traffic and boost mobility for residents.

If this launch is successful, Lime could look to expand to more remote reservations that have been overlooked in the bike-share boom.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

A-Rod In Paradise: Swinging For Redemption Through Baseball And Business

LinkedIn

Even as Alex Rodriguez sits contemplating a platter of raspberries at the Four Seasons in Austin, he is chasing something. The day before, in preparation for his new gig as an ESPN Sunday Night Baseballanalyst, he visited three teams at spring training in Arizona. Today in Texas, he gave a keynote address at South by Southwest titled “Baseball, Business and Redemption” with CNBC chairman Mark Hoffman. And later he’ll jet home to Miami to spend time with his two daughters before heading to Tampa to see the Yankees in his role as special advisor.

“I’m totally grateful for where I am today and do not take anything for granted,” the 42-year-old Rodriguez says. “And I felt that once I owned all of that and started digging myself out of this black hole, I wanted to come out a different person.”

What Rodriguez is chasing these days is redemption–and in the wake of his 2016 retirement, he’s finding it by analyzing baseball and business. He debuted as a commentator for Fox last year before adding the ESPN job, remarkably coexisting with rival networks. Rodriguez also oversees A-Rod Corp, which includes real estate investments (13,000 units across ten states), conditioning companies (from UFC-branded gyms to TruFusion, a kettle-bells-and-hot-yoga outlet) and startups (with stakes in Josh Kushner’s health insurance company, Oscar, as well as the ride-sharing service Didi and the eSports team NRG). He’s even made savvy moves with his own real estate, selling his Miami Beach mansion for $30 million in 2013 (double what he paid) before building his dream home in Coral Gables.

His real-life investing expertise landed him a guest spot on ABC’s Shark Tank in 2017, becoming the show’s first Hispanic shark. This year he’s displaying his coaching skills on CNBC’s Michael Strahan-produced Back in the Game, in which Rodriguez creates a financial plan for Joe Smith, a former No. 1 NBA draft pick who squandered career earnings of $61 million. Says Hoffman: “It’s an opportunity to educate, which is also at the core of Alex’s redemption story.”

For Rodriguez, the curriculum began at birth. His father, Victor, ran a shoe store in New York City before moving his clan to the baseball-obsessed Dominican Republic and then to Miami. “I’ve always had passion and a dream to be both mainly a baseball player and a businessman,” Rodriguez says. “That’s what my father was, and I wanted to be like him.”

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

How the Hornets’ New Head Coach James Borrego Is Blazing a Trail for Latinos in the NBA

LinkedIn
NBA coach james borrego

On Tuesday, the Charlotte Hornets named James Borrego its new head coach – a relatively nondescript hire as far as the NBA is concerned, but a meaningful one for aspiring Latino coaches everywhere.

The 40-year-old Albuquerque native joins a select group of Latinos to ever ascend to the NBA head coaching ranks, following the likes of Dick Versace, head coach of the Indiana Pacers from 1988 to 1990, and Earl Watson, who coached the Phoenix Suns from 2015 to 2017.

But while Versace and Watson both stepped into interim positions within their organizations before staying on full-time, Borrego was an external hire – and a highly sought after one at that – representing another milestone for Latino basketball coaches. Borrego had recently been linked to head coaching vacancies in New York, Phoenix, and Milwaukee, and reportedly turned down the opportunity to coach at the University of New Mexico in 2017.

Raised by his mother, Lydia, in a single-parent household in New Mexico, Borrego made the move from playing to coaching shortly after college. He’s spent most of his career with the San Antonio Spurs, beginning as an assistant video coordinator in 2003 before making his way up to assistant coach, working alongside future Hall of Famer Gregg Popovich. In between stints in San Antonio, Borrego also worked as an assistant coach in New Orleans and Orlando, assuming interim head coaching duties for the Magic after the firing of then-head coach Jacque Vaughn.

Popovich has spoken fondly of Borrego’s contributions through the years: “He basically made us smarter… Now when one of our film guys screws something up, we’ve got J.B.’s number on speed dial.”

While assistant coaches can only do so much to distinguish themselves from their peers, the Hornets quickly grew fond of Borrego, according to ESPN’s Adrian Wojnarowski: “Borrego made a strong impression in his interview with Mitch Kupchak, the Hornets’ new president of basketball operations and general manager. Kupchak became more intrigued once he started to canvass NBA executives, coaches and players who have worked with Borrego, sources told ESPN.”

Continue onto Remezcla to read the complete article.