Job Interview Do’s and Don’ts That Everyone Should Know

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Job Interview

A job interview can be the most challenging part of an employment search. While you can do almost everything else — writing up a resume, crafting a cover letter, and looking at job postings — from the safety and security of your home, actually putting yourself together and meeting with a potential employer is tough. It’s stressful, unpredictable, and there are all kinds of things that can go wrong.

With that in mind, you should do everything you can to go in prepared. Being prepared doesn’t guarantee that everything will go smoothly or that you’ll walk out with an offer, but if you’ve ever tried to “wing it” or go in without proper prep, you know how deep you can get in before ultimately walking away embarrassed and humbled. So, take the time to do some homework before the job.

A job interview can be the most challenging part of an employment search. While you can do almost everything else — writing up a resume, crafting a cover letter, and looking at job postings — from the safety and security of your home, actually putting yourself together and meeting with a potential employer is tough. It’s stressful, unpredictable, and there are all kinds of things that can go wrong.

With that in mind, you should do everything you can to go in prepared. Being prepared doesn’t guarantee that everything will go smoothly or that you’ll walk out with an offer, but if you’ve ever tried to “wing it” or go in without proper prep, you know how deep you can get in before ultimately walking away embarrassed and humbled. So, take the time to do some homework before the job interview.

There is no blueprint for acing a job interview, unfortunately. Each interview will be different, and you’ll be meeting with new people each time; some tough, some pushovers. But you should know the basics — what to wear, what questions to ask, and what you absolutely should or should not do during your time with a hiring manager.

Here is a brief overview of those dos and don’ts.

Be Confident

Confidence is of the utmost importance during an interview. The last thing you want to do is waddle into a room with a hiring manager and look like an absolute wreck. You need to be composed, speak well, and give the impression that you can handle the job, even when it becomes incredibly stressful. As we’ve written about before, employers can tell when you’re nervous or anxious, and will make you pay for it. Do your homework, and walk in prepared. Confidence can make a huge difference in how an interview ultimately turns out.

Don’t: Be an egomaniac

Striking a balance between an inflated sense of self-importance and confidence is a bit tricky, but if you’re mindful of how you’re coming off, you should be fine. We discussed this issue — the fact that ego can be destructive — with Ryan Holiday who had some tips for how to effectively navigate it. Read the interview, and remember that confidence and ego aren’t the same thing.

Do: Know your strengths and weaknesses

Everybody hates those questions pertaining to our strengths and weaknesses. They are trick questions, in a sense, to see if you can actually gauge your own shortcomings and strong points, while not just feeding the interviewer a boilerplate answer. They want honesty, and they want to see how you handle difficult questions.

With that said, you should know what your strengths and weaknesses are. Give it some serious thought, and have an answer prepared. Nobody’s perfect, and employers don’t necessarily expect you to be.

Don’t: Be dishonest

To rehash what we just covered, don’t be dishonest or make up some nonsense about how “your greatest strenght is that you work too hard.” Everybody sees through it, and knows it’s a load of crap. Figure out a real strength or weakness, and expand upon it during the discussion. It can and should be a weakness you’re actively managing or working through, which is what an employer is going to want to hear.

As tedious and time-consuming as it may be, you should tailor your resume to specific job listings. If you’re using the same resume for different positions, you’re likely to not even get past the initial screening software many employers use to sift through piles of resumes. Look for keywords used in the job listing, and use them in the copy. Don’t keep a bunch of irrelevant information on there either, if it doesn’t pertain to the position you’re applying for.

Don’t: Recycle material

As mentioned, you shouldn’t just be using the same resume for any and every job. They’re all different, and each application will require a little effort and customization. Don’t recycle the same resume over and over, because it’ll probably get you nowhere. Oh, and be sure not to lie — employers hate that.

Do: Be willing to do what others won’t

You know what really makes a difference? Being that guy or gal who’s willing to roll up their sleeves and do the dirty work. To do the stuff nobody else wants to do. That’ll win you favor with management, and earn you the respect of your colleagues. Lead by example, and it’ll take you a long way. So, be sure your ego is in check, and let an employer know that they can count on you to get things done — even if it’s going to be unpleasant.

Don’t: Think you’re above it all

We covered the problem with ego previously, and it applies here as well. You need to realize that there will be problems that require some hard work, ingenuity, and getting dirty every once in a while. If you’re willing and able to do these tasks, new doors can open to you. Like our friend Mike Rowe told us, if people are more willing to get dirty every once in a while, we’d all probably be a lot better off.

In the same way that you need to have a tailored and expertly written resume, your other materials — like your cover letter — need to be in tip-top shape. There are a ton of resources and experts out there that can help you, but you basically need to focus on being clear, concise, and organized. A bad cover letter can cost you a job.

Continue to on to CheatSheet.com to read the complete article

A Latina Google Strategist’s Views On Authenticity, Embracing Your Identity And The Power Of Instagram

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Dannie Fountain is known as a builder, whether she’s rebuilding her own identity or building a brand, she has a reputation for how tightly she can weave a story that just feels right.

While the skill set was there during her teenage years it was her freshman year of college that challenged her ability to put them to the test.

“I was adopted at 16, changing my identity all over again, and removing my ability to access the historical information that had been shared, because I no longer had access to their source – my mother’s anecdotal nuggets,” explains Fountain. “My identity changed once again during my freshman year of college. Through some health-related decisions, tough conversations, and a DNA test, I discovered that the wholly-British descent I’d been raised to understand was actually pretty off.”

The unexpected medical tests led to Fountain discovering that she was Latinx and deciding to melt into an identity that had always belonged to her.

Now as a strategist at Google and as an independent marketing consultant, Fountain uses her storytelling skills to support brands and their larger missions.

Below she shares how she champions inclusivity in all the spaces she inhabits, what advice she has for other Latinxs, and how she balances both her corporate job and side hustles.

Vivian Nunez: What made you join the team at Google in addition to working for yourself? 

Dannie Fountain: Truthfully, I wasn’t looking for a job when the Google opportunity happened. I was surviving (nay, thriving) in the rollercoaster of “feast and famine” that is entrepreneurship and I truly was in love with my life. When the Google opportunity first cropped up in my inbox, my reaction was one of imposter syndrome – who am I to believe I’m important/talented/brave/strong/cool enough to pursue an opportunity like this? But Google has this kind of kinetic power, one that won’t let you say no. So I pursued it, and the more I pursued it, the more I fell in love. Now, nine months later, I can truly smile when I say Google is my corporate home and the first place I’ve ever worked where I’ve unapologetically brought my whole self to work every single day. 

Nunez: How have you navigated the transition to an in-house, full-time job? 

Fountain: I’ve always been a “side hustler” in some form of the word – whether it was running my marketing consulting firm while in college or running my second business while maintaining my first. But this transition from freelancing to working at Google was an interesting one. Before I came to Google, I was on the road nearly 24/7 for speaking engagements and work. Not only was I coming back into a space where I had a boss again, but I also was going to have an apartment of my own for the first time in nearly 2 years.

The transition was smoother than expected in some ways (i.e. I have fallen in love with having a commute again) and harder in others (I didn’t actually stop traveling as much and so I still feel like I’m on the road all the time). Having coworkers and the resources to do all the things I’ve dreamed of doing is incredible – I love the opportunity for casual collision that sparks these moments of innovation that profoundly change the way I think about marketing. I’m beyond grateful for the access and opportunity I’ve gotten in the nine months I’ve been at Google. But at the end of the day, I’m a Googler and still a freelancer, so really not much has changed.

Nunez: How important is it for you that others understand that you are proudly Latina?

Fountain: In some ways, I feel so much shame for identifying as Latina. My grasp on culture and history is limited. My grasp on language is weak. My appearance is that of a white woman. It took me taking an actual DNA test and seeing the results with my own eyes before I’d actually start checking the “hispanic or latino” box on things, let alone verbally speaking that identity aloud.

But I also recognize my privilege. I know that I have the power to walk into a room and be presumed white and there is so much responsibility in that presumption. There’s this profound sense of urgency to make it unequivocally clear that [Latinx] is who I am, all in, 100%

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

How to Stand Out on the Job

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Workplaces can be extremely competitive! It can be tempting to rely on gimmicks like flashy clothes or jokes to stand out at work, but this can backfire if you’re looking for a promotion. If you want to get noticed by your superiors at work, the best way to stand out is to conform to your workplace, do quality work, and be a good colleague.

Why Work on Getting Noticed?

You might be the hardest worker in your organization, and the one everyone wants on their team—but, if you’re not in people’s thoughts, then you’ll be passed up for new projects, additional responsibilities, awards, and promotions.

That’s why you need to be visible at work!

Let’s look at some strategies that you can use to get noticed in the workplace.

Developing Specialist Skills

Do you consider yourself a “generalist,” someone who does many different things in different roles, or a “specialist,” someone who is an expert in one or two specific areas?

New businesses often hire generalists, because they can perform in so many different roles. As organizations grow, however, specialists are often hired to focus on key areas. This may leave the hard-working generalists feeling pushed aside and disempowered.

If you’re a generalist, think strategically about what types of skills your organization needs. Work on building these skills to become a specialist. The more knowledgeable and skillful you become in a particular area, the more likely you are to be noticed for your work.

Remember that organizations also tend to look for people with great “soft skills”—non-technical skills such as creative thinking, emotional intelligence, conflict resolution, communication skills, flexibility, and coaching. These are often as important as professional expertise.

If you’re thinking about becoming a specialist in a certain area, don’t forget to consider these important soft skills. Helping your boss resolve a major conflict within your team will get you noticed just as much as delivering a great presentation or sales report.

Essentially, if you help people out when they need assistance, then people will help you out too.

And if you take the time to build and nurture relationships with the people around you, you’ll build a network of “allies” who can help you get assigned to interesting, significant, or eye-catching projects that might otherwise go to someone else. They may also recommend you to other departments, which can open up opportunities that might not have been available to you without their recommendations.

Build a network of alliances within your department, with other departments, and with the executive team or board. Try to get assigned to teams that involve a wide variety of people. This can help you build your reputation and make important friendships.

Also, build your network outside of office hours. Socializing with colleagues after work often makes everyone feel more relaxed and open to new friendships.

Tracking Your Accomplishments

When you’re working hard, it’s easy to forget all of your achievements over the last 6 to 12 months. This won’t help when it’s time for your performance review.

Keep track of all of your accomplishments within the organization. If clients or colleagues give you compliments, write them down. If the compliment came in an email, print it. If you exceeded last quarter’s sales goals, get the paperwork that proves it.

Put all of these great compliments and achievements in a file and bring the file to your performance review. This gives you hard evidence to prove to your boss what a great job you’re doing. Then, when it’s time to ask for a pay raise or promotion, it may be harder for your manager to say no.

Getting Out of the Shadows

Sometimes, whether intentionally or unintentionally, your manager or colleagues may present your ideas as their own.

However, if you want to get noticed, you must receive credit for your ideas.

If this happens to you, first find out if it’s also happening to anyone else. Often, a colleague or boss “borrows” ideas from several people, not just one. One way to discover this is by simply watching other people’s body language around this person.

If your colleague or manager is taking credit for only your work, but no one else’s, then document it every time it occurs. If practical, “watermark” your work whenever you can (this is a feature in some word processing software packages). If the person claims your ideas as their own in a meeting, gently but firmly correct the misstatement.

Taking on More Responsibilities

You can also get noticed by your manager and other executives by taking on more responsibilities whenever possible.

This doesn’t mean that you should overwork yourself! But if you see a new project or role that will help you expand your skills, take advantage of it. Do this, particularly if it’s one that has high visibility within the organization or has a significant impact on the bottom line.

This is particularly important with innovation and process improvement. Developing a reputation as an innovator or creative thinker can be valuable. If you believe that you have the ability to innovate and think of good ideas then try to get assigned to projects where these skills are valued.

Tip: While you’re doing this, make sure that you continue to do the core parts of your job well. If you fail to do this, you’ll get noticed—but for all the wrong reasons!

More Tips on Getting Noticed

Here are a few more ideas for getting the people you work with to notice you:

  • Make sure you’re visible. Spend a few minutes every day greeting and talking with your coworkers. A simple smile can help tremendously. Also, try to speak to colleagues face-to-face from time to time, instead of sending emails or instant messages.
  • Praise others. If you have a colleague who works as hard as you, then praise the person in front of your manager. Be specific, and sincere, about what the person is doing.
  • Stay updated on your industry. Read trade newsletters or other relevant materials that keep you up-to-date on trends and technology. You never know when this information will be valuable.
  • Find a mentor. Mentors can offer valuable advice and career coaching. The chances are that the mentor has been through the same situations that you’re experiencing and can help you navigate them successfully.
  • Get involved with your organization’s charity events. Volunteering for these activities—like running in a race or coaching a children’s team—can help you build your network within the organization.

Source: mindtools.com

This Latina VP Believes This One Trick Will Help Build A Diverse Pipeline

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Carly Sanchez has led with a people first mindset since the beginning of her career in higher education, now as the Executive Vice President and Head of Talent Acquisition Strategy and Delivery at Wells Fargo she is able to scale her impact.

“[My role] encompasses the leadership of all team member hiring globally for positions across Wells Fargo at all levels, with an emphasis on targeted recruiting for diverse segments,” explains Sanchez. “I serve as the primary liaison to the Chief Diversity Officer for all human capital diversity issues.”

As a Latina, Sanchez understands the impact of having the right structures in place that would help facilitate not only the hiring of a diverse talent pool, but also its retention.

“I think it is critical for Latinas to serve as sponsors and actively engage in identifying and sponsoring talent for positions to advance careers of those coming through the ranks,” shares Sanchez.

The goal is to ensure that those who are talented and qualified have the opportunity to walk through the right doors and feel like they belong.

“I gain the greatest satisfaction from helping identify diverse talent and enabling their future path through education as an admissions officer and now through facilitating opportunities for career advancement through recruiting, hiring and D&I work,” says Sanchez.

Below Sanchez shares more about her day-to-day work, what her hopes are for Latina peer mentorship, and her advice to all who are navigating corporate ladders.

Vivian Nunez: How would you define your career’s mission and how do you implement it on a day to day? 

Carly Sanchez: My career mission is to optimize opportunities for talented individuals that will allow and enable them to maximize that talent in an environment that is conducive and values a diversity of perspectives and backgrounds. On a day to day level, my role now is less focused on individual positions for which we are hiring (although I still do stay involved in that) and now more focused on designing a strategy and organizational structure that will enable the businesses and functions at Wells Fargo to attract and promote the best most diverse mix of talent to support the work.

Nunez: How do you ensure that hiring is as diverse as possible? 

Sanchez: Outreach and sourcing of diverse talent pools is critical, building the pipelines in advance of the opening of a position. This enables us to build diverse candidate slates for review and increases opportunities for selection in an equitable process. Our team partners with many diversity focused organizations to build talent pools, targets potential sources of talent (for example, working with military bases for hiring of transitioning military etc.), partners with HR partners and hiring managers to identify where we may have greater opportunity to increase diversity at all levels of the organization, and consults on issues related to D&I including how Unconscious Bias can negatively impact our commitment to a diverse and inclusive workforce.

Nunez: What advice do you have for Latinas who are looking to break into spaces that are predominantly white? 

Sanchez: Mentoring and sponsorship can be critical as Latinas look to bring their talent to different challenging environments.  Identifying individuals who can help you learn more about the role and meet individuals working in these organizations is ideal. It is also important to research and educate oneself about the organization, including developing a detailed understanding of the mission, the day to day work and any available information on the organization. This demonstrates your true interest and commitment when you have an opportunity to connect.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

How This Latina Brought Her Dream For Quiero — A Latinx Talk Show — To Life

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The conversations on QUIERO the Show, a Latinx talk show web series, are centered on the Latinx experience. Priscilla Garcia Jacquier sits opposite her guests, the likes of Alexander Dinelaris, Emma Ramos, and Michelle Veintimilla, as she builds a conversation on their experiences pursuing their truest passions.

“The show is about tools for success, so I like to think through people’s lives and how their experience could help other people,” explains Garcia-Jacquier. “Sometimes that means that they’re at the top of the game, sometimes that means that they’re just starting out, but their hustle is on point.”

The series has a complete first season with 10 episodes currently available on YouTube with plans to film season 2 this summer in Los Angeles.

“It became clear that I wanted to build a platform that would both help people’s hearts and also give them the tools necessary for success — LatinX success,” shares Garcia-Jacquier. “LatinX hunger gets confused into a sort of ‘grateful immigrant’ narrative that I have really become tired of. No, we’re not here working away our gratitude every day and thanking the borders for letting us through in humble submission. We are here to build, to create, to empower, and honestly, to have an economic impact.”

Quiero’s first season is the result of hustle and pure determination — filmed in Garcia-Jacquier’s New York City bedroom with equipment her and her team already owned. Season 2 is a dream supported by a community of individuals who supported their Kickstarter campaign and understood the vision, and the need, for a series like Quiero.

“As an entrepreneur, I’ve learned it’s going to take time and that I have to make direct asks,” shares Garcia-Jacquier. “Somehow, I’ve approached a lot of exchanges surrendering my instinct and allowing others’ expertise to overpower my gut. I’m learning that I need to follow my instincts and be very direct in the asks that it requires. It’s the only way that people meet you halfway.”

Below Garcia-Jacquier shares the behind-the-scenes of building a web series, leaving behind her 9-to-5 for her own passion project, and the advice she has for Latinx.

Vivian Nunez: When did you know it was time to quit your job to focus on your passion projects? 

Priscila Garcia-Jacquier:I have been assisting at the highest levels of entertainment since I was 19. My mentors’ projects have always been the most important tasks for me and I took to their lives as if they were my own. That’s what you’re supposed to do, that’s what being a Hollywood assistant means— that’s how you learn and absorb. I have loved every step of the way. However, this year, it became increasingly difficult to leave my projects at home, even for the day. I felt a pull to prioritize them, to prioritize myself. I think some people do figure out a way to work and apprentice and still go home to their projects with their whole heart. I admire those people. That was not the case for me. If someone else’s project is in front of me, I will completely surrender into it. It’s easy to lose sight of the importance of your own script when the one at work stars a major celebrity. I’m 26 now and I wasn’t okay with that anymore. I realized that the only way to really create a boundary for myself was to start working for me.

Nunez: What inspired Quiero? 

Garcia-Jacquier: A year ago, I was feeling stuck and frustrated. I felt bogged down by the work I wasn’t creating and felt pressured to produce. I sat down with myself and I thought— what can I produce right now? What can I bring my team together to start making tomorrow? In the meantime, I was really thinking about the things that actually interested me and how I actually liked to spend my time. It turns out that I’ve always been a self-help junky and consume the medium relentlessly. Lewis Howes, Marie Forleo, Gabby Bernstein, Oprah, are all people whose content I invest in and whose lessons I apply. I allowed myself to start thinking about it— what if this isn’t just your hobby? What if part of your interest is that you want to… do that? I sat down with my EP and kind of whispered this crazy idea to her that I wanted to start my own talkshow. That my favorite part of any job is always the connection. Who will have a meaningful impact on my life next?

Nunez: Why do you think a show like Quiero is necessary? 

Garcia-Jacquier: I made Quiero because I needed Quiero. Quiero is my way to fight the harmful narratives about LatinX that have arisen from our current political climate. But Quiero is also my way of learning about the community— we’re very misunderstood, both inside and outside of the community. We all come from different countries, with different cultures, and very different Spanishes, and then we arrive here and are expected to be the same. Not to mention that my experience as an LatinX immigrant differs greatly from someone who is first, second, or third generation. We have to be open in saying that we are here and we are building a new culture. To be Latino American is a new and different thing. I’m curious about that thing, I want to partake in building what that means— but we have to be open about it, all while highlighting our success. That’s Quiero.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Cliché Answers to the Most Common Interview Questions

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Hispanic Businesswoman

By Brianna Flavin

The internet offers a massive amount of job interview advice, sample questions and potential responses. When you are trying to land a job, it’s easy to devour this advice in bulk, but that might actually be more detrimental to your career than you realize.

What’s resulted is hiring managers hearing the same cliché responses over and over again. When your objective is to learn about applicants to determine if they will be a good fit for the position, and they all say their biggest flaw is “perfectionism,” it’s frustrating, to say the least.

As a job seeker, you want to do your homework and come to the interview prepared to answer the most common interview questions. But how can you avoid sounding like an echo of every other candidate?

“The preferred response to any question is one that is honest and upfront,” says staffing and onboarding coach Jen Teague. Ideally, your circumstances, interests and aspirations will factor into every answer, leaving your interviewer with a clear and accurate impression of who you are.

To get you started in the right direction—and to help you steer clear of some responses that could leave a bad impression—we asked hiring managers to share the most cliché answers they encounter when interviewing job candidates. See what the folks in the hiring seats are sick of hearing and their advice on how to craft a more impressive response.

  1. Why would you excel at this job?

What NOT to say: “I like working with people.”

“This is one of the most robotic answers a candidate could provide,” according to Beth Tucker, CEO of KNF&T Staffing Resources. She says though it might seem like a friendly answer, it doesn’t actually reveal anything about you as a person or employee.

“Most people like to work with other people,” Tucker explains. “Instead of saying this, try thinking of the core message you’re trying to communicate.” Are you an especially strong communicator? Do you work harder when you’re collaborating with coworkers on a project? Do you enjoy delegating responsibility?

“You’re much better off giving an example that demonstrates your abilities,” Tucker says.

A better approach: Talk about a team project where you interacted with a diverse group of people—or difficult people. This will have a much bigger impact and make a better impression on the interviewer.

  1. What do you know about our company?

What NOT to say: “Not much. I was hoping you could tell me.”

“This answer highlights your lack of initiative and preparation,” says Mike Smith, founder of SalesCoaching1. He urges to always do your research on any company you are interviewing with and come prepared to dazzle.

A better approach: Smith suggests a statement that displays what you understand about the company and what you might still want clarification on. An example is, “I found your annual report and noticed your company has grown your market share and is opening other branches. What is the next location planned?”

  1. Why do you want to be in this business?

What NOT to say: “It looks like a cool company to work for.”

This vague enthusiasm also reveals a lack of research. Smith says experienced interviewers hear this same answer time and time again. Why would you prefer to work for this company, rather than some of their competitors? Even if you do plan to interview at both companies, you are better off being specific.

A better approach: “I have done a lot of research in this marketplace. Your company and your competitors (name them) are in the fastest growing sector. I want to be a part of that growth.”

  1. Why did you apply for this position?

What NOT to say: “I want to get my career started.”

“The worst cliché answer I receive is something along the lines of, ‘I’m not picky about my position; I just want a chance to work,’” says Shell Harris, President of Big Oak Studios Inc. He says this kind of answer typically comes from the mouths of college graduates having difficulty landing their first job.

“When I hear this response, I am thinking this person is desperate to work and will say anything to get any job, even a job they may not like,” Harris says. He adds that this is often an indicator that the candidate will continue job searching even if he or she does land the position. He believes applicants who have specific expectations about what kind of work they will do in the company come off much better.

“It tells me they understand what we do, how they can help and, most importantly, that they want to be a part of the company,” Harris says. “Sure, I believe they want to work, but they aren’t being honest with me or themselves if they say they’ll take any job.”

A better approach: Talk about what the role you’re applying for does for you. Could it help you develop a skill you’re hoping to sharpen? Does it align with your strengths or expertise? What excites you about the position?

  1. What is your biggest weakness as an employee?

What NOT to say: “I’m a perfectionist.”

This is one of the biggest clichés out there in interviewing world. “The age-old advice about spinning any negative about yourself into a positive only works when it’s specific,” says Gail Abelman, recruiter at Staffing Perfection.

“I can’t tell you the number of times I have heard people tell me, ‘I’m a perfectionist,’ or ‘I’m too honest,’” she says. “These are about as cliché and phony as it gets.”

“You can tell immediately when people are not being genuine,” says Rebecca Baggett, Director of Human Resources at Bigger Pockets. She says responses like ‘I’m a perfectionist’ or ‘I’m too loyal’ really communicate either a lack of honesty or a lack of self-awareness. “I always appreciate when a candidate says, ‘I messed up and this is how I corrected the situation,’” she says.

Ableman advises telling a story to answer this kind of question. It will sound more personal and realistic, and you will provide your interviewer with a better picture of who you are and what it will be like to hire you.

A better approach: Describe an issue you experienced at a previous job, the problem you had solving it and the steps you took to ultimately overcome it.

  1. What are your long-term goals?

What NOT to say: “I want to move up within the company.”

Advancement might seem like the only right answer to give to this question, but thinking of your goals in terms of a one line track to the top is actually rather limiting. Teague says personal goals as well as professional goals can play into your answer here, particularly if they could intersect (i.e., Wanting to learn another language).

Once again, get specific. Your interviewer wants to know what motivates you. Try to think beyond a larger paycheck and detail some goals that make you excited about what you do.

A better approach: Explain that you’re motivated to advance as a professional, and list some particular goals you’d like to achieve (both personal and professional).

  1. Do you have any questions for me?

What NOT to say: “No, I think you covered them all.”

This answer if often on the tip of everyone’s jittery tongue at the close of an interview, but it reveals no preparation or willingness to research the industry, according to Smith. As this is often the question that will conclude the interview, your response has the potential to leave a particularly lasting impression.

Smith suggests thanking interviewers for what they did cover and offering at least one, in-depth question. You can riff off something they already mentioned in the interview or bring up something you found in your research. “This shows a business maturity and a professional approach,” Smith adds.

A better approach: Ask about a recent announcement you encountered in your research or ask the interviewer about what brought them to the company.

About Rasmussen College

Rasmussen College is a regionally accredited private college that is dedicated to changing lives and the communities it serves through high-demand and flexible educational programs. Since 1900, the College has been committed to academic innovation and empowering students to pursue a college degree. Rasmussen College offers certificate and diploma programs through associate’s, bachelor’s and master’s degrees in seven schools of study including business, health sciences, nursing, technology, design, education and justice studies.

Source: Rasmussen.edu

The iGen iEverything Train is Coming, but Are You Ready?

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iGen

Technology is being consumed at an ever increasing rate causing executives, managers, and process improvement experts on the factory floor to re-define the methods of training and dissemination that have become obsolete.

Critical skills and tribal knowledge are being lost as boomers retire and training plans for new employees fall short of preparing workers for the sophistication of the new manufacturing environment.

Move over millennials, here comes the IGen! Born between 1995 and 2005 this group of tech savvy natives is the next cohort and are just now entering the workforce. IGen, or Gen Z as they are often referred, have grown up in a world of social media where Youtube, Instagram, and Twitter reign supreme. These kids are a force to be reckoned with and require access to information in ways that are familiar, immediate, and actionable. Our success depends on them because as the IGen goes, so goes the manufacturing industry, the nation, and the world.

Alliance Resource Group, in partnership with Sify Technologies has pulled together experts from manufacturing, academia and automated methodologies to develop a solution that addresses the manufacturing challenge of this next generation and identifies the key components of a successful framework including content management, dissemination methodology, scalability, and integration with current learning management systems. These components constitute a micro-learning strategy that facilitates current and future state requirements.

Alliance Resource Group (ARG), is a service disabled veteran owned business located in Newport Beach California. With a foundation in resource management, recruiting, and consulting, ARG provides services to small and medium size companies throughout the United States.

View the ARG White Paper here! Better be prepared for total process transformation if you want to remain competitive.

Lime is the first bike share to reach a Native American community

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Over 119 bike-share systems now exist across America, and with the rise of dockless bikes, more and more communities are gaining access to these crucial mobility tools. But if you look at the map, you’ll see that the spread of bike-share services has left out an entire population: the more than 570 Native American tribes in the United States.

Today, Lime (formerly known as LimeBike) took the first step toward providing access for a Native American territory. The dockless bike-share company will launch in the Reno-Sparks Indian Colony, as part of a larger northern Nevada regional partnership that will also bring bikes to the University of Nevada, Reno and a handful of cities. The Reno-Sparks Indian Colony is situated not too far outside the cities of Reno and Sparks, and tribal leaders told Lime that they’re looking forward to the opportunity to reduce automobile traffic and boost mobility for residents.

If this launch is successful, Lime could look to expand to more remote reservations that have been overlooked in the bike-share boom.

Continue onto Fast Company to read the complete article.

A-Rod In Paradise: Swinging For Redemption Through Baseball And Business

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Even as Alex Rodriguez sits contemplating a platter of raspberries at the Four Seasons in Austin, he is chasing something. The day before, in preparation for his new gig as an ESPN Sunday Night Baseballanalyst, he visited three teams at spring training in Arizona. Today in Texas, he gave a keynote address at South by Southwest titled “Baseball, Business and Redemption” with CNBC chairman Mark Hoffman. And later he’ll jet home to Miami to spend time with his two daughters before heading to Tampa to see the Yankees in his role as special advisor.

“I’m totally grateful for where I am today and do not take anything for granted,” the 42-year-old Rodriguez says. “And I felt that once I owned all of that and started digging myself out of this black hole, I wanted to come out a different person.”

What Rodriguez is chasing these days is redemption–and in the wake of his 2016 retirement, he’s finding it by analyzing baseball and business. He debuted as a commentator for Fox last year before adding the ESPN job, remarkably coexisting with rival networks. Rodriguez also oversees A-Rod Corp, which includes real estate investments (13,000 units across ten states), conditioning companies (from UFC-branded gyms to TruFusion, a kettle-bells-and-hot-yoga outlet) and startups (with stakes in Josh Kushner’s health insurance company, Oscar, as well as the ride-sharing service Didi and the eSports team NRG). He’s even made savvy moves with his own real estate, selling his Miami Beach mansion for $30 million in 2013 (double what he paid) before building his dream home in Coral Gables.

His real-life investing expertise landed him a guest spot on ABC’s Shark Tank in 2017, becoming the show’s first Hispanic shark. This year he’s displaying his coaching skills on CNBC’s Michael Strahan-produced Back in the Game, in which Rodriguez creates a financial plan for Joe Smith, a former No. 1 NBA draft pick who squandered career earnings of $61 million. Says Hoffman: “It’s an opportunity to educate, which is also at the core of Alex’s redemption story.”

For Rodriguez, the curriculum began at birth. His father, Victor, ran a shoe store in New York City before moving his clan to the baseball-obsessed Dominican Republic and then to Miami. “I’ve always had passion and a dream to be both mainly a baseball player and a businessman,” Rodriguez says. “That’s what my father was, and I wanted to be like him.”

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Latinos Often Lack Access to Career Networking Opportunities. This Platform Aims to Change That

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It’s not what you know, it’s who you know.” While it’s an unfair fact of life, landing a job can come down to your professional connections. But for Latinos – who find themselves underrepresented across many industries – this poses a challenge. But what if you could easily scroll through a list of Latino contacts in your same industry who could give you guidance and serve as mentors? BeVisible – a platform that basically serves as a Rolodex of Latino professionals – does just that.

Started by Adriana Guendelman and Silvia Travesani, BeVisible is a career network for the Latino community. Much like LinkedIn and Indeed, BeVisible features job listings, many of which members of the Latino community are particularly well suited for, as well as the aforementioned directory of Latino contacts and tips on how to navigate your career and even finances. “We fuse the freshest ideas in social networking with content from the nation’s most influential Latinxs,” the site’s About Us section reads. “BeVisible blends online journalism with the ability of our community members to share content, ask questions, and build professional profiles. BeVisible allows Latinxs to connect to peers, mentors, and resources – including recruiters from top universities and companies.”

Guendelman knows what it feels like to lack a supportive professional community. Born in Oakland but raised in Chile, she struggled to find a job after graduating top of her class at University of Chile Law School. She returned to the United States and attended Harvard Law School, which resulted in a plethora of opportunities, despite having no personal connections.

But attending an Ivy League isn’t a possibility for everyone, so a platform like BeVisible can help us get a foot in the door. The website has more than 15,000 registered users – who can be searched for by name, company, industry, and location – in fields, such as software development and engineering to business and media. Now, Guendelman is hoping to bring some of this assistance to marginalized communities in real life. On May 17, she’s launching BeWorkSF, a one-of-a-kind multicultural networking event for Latinx professionals. Her team describes the conference as an “unprecedented” event where the worlds of technology, art, music and professionalism collide to create a vibrant and entertaining immersive experience.

Talented professionals and companies will connect in a space that genuinely embraces inclusion, diversity, and belonging by bridging the gap between theory and practice. Guendelman wants women, the LGBTQ community, non-gender binary individuals, people of color, and all individuals to reach their full potential. She knows first-hand no one person can accomplish success without a support system.

BeWokeSF will take place at the Pearl in San Francisco and feature numerous corporate executives, thought leaders, hiring managers and employee resource groups. The mission of the conference is to “dissolve professional and personal barriers to success.”

Continue onto Remzcla to read the complete article.

This Latina Is Using Her Own Experience With Blindness To Bring About Change In The Workforce

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Over the course of her career, Kathy Martinez has worked with the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, served under two administrations, and led Wells Fargo’s Disability and Accessibility strategy — when she was just starting her career, her counselor at the California Department of Rehabilitation believed that her career aspirations would not extend past working at a lock factory, all because she was blind.

“My counselor at the California Department of Rehabilitation had minimal expectations for people with disabilities and tended to offer low-levels jobs with no hope for growth,” explains Martinez. “Although his expectations for me were low, I had people in my life who knew I could do more, and were behind me every step of the way while I pursued my degree.”

While it took Martinez 13 years to graduate from college, the later start in her career has not prevented her from making an impact where it matters most to her — ensuring that those living with disabilities are not discounted.

“My passion is to help create a society and work environment where people with all abilities are able to obtain an education, secure a good job, buy a house, and be successful,” shares Martinez. “This includes building a society that is physically and digitally accessible, and help change attitudes about the capabilities of people with disabilities and our desire to contribute to our communities and corporations.”

Martinez’s own career has helped moved the needle forward in how those with disabilities are both treated and see themselves in the workforce. She has made it a point to both champion inclusivity within companies, while not erasing that humanity and dignity should be prevalent values in a company culture, regardless of the employee.

“My focus is on delivering an experience that recognizes disability as a natural part of the human condition and helping people with disabilities fully engage with the company to succeed financially,” shares Martinez. “With a more accessible workplace, more people with disabilities will be on the payroll rather than rely on benefits and, ultimately, increase their capacity to be productive members of their communities.”

Below Martinez shares further thoughts on how companies should be expanding their cultures to champion those with disabilities, what advice she has for Latinas, and her biggest lesson learned.

Vivian Nunez: What are your goals in changing how those with disabilities are able to access career opportunities?

Kathy Martinez: When I was growing up I never saw people with disabilities who worked at banks unless they were in entry-level jobs. Today financial institutions, like Wells Fargo, are hiring people with disabilities at all levels. I never imagined I would have the job title of senior vice president at Wells Forgo or Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy. And now that I have attained those titles, I want other people, such as Latinos and people with disabilities, to know that they can achieve their professional goals, including the position of CEO.

One of my key goals is to ensure that more people with disabilities are at all levels of the career ladder. That is why was passionate in helping develop and roll out Wells Fargo’s Diverse Leaders Program for People with Diverse Abilities. This unique three-day program enables team members, who identify as individuals with a disability, understand, and embrace their strengths, overcome challenges, and learn how their differences help them add value as leaders on the Wells Fargo team.

Another goal is to get more people to serve as a mentor and mentee to others with disabilities. I serve as a mentor for people of all abilities inside and outside of the company, and continue to learn what it means to be a team member of choice so that I can share that information with the Latino and disabilities communities.

Nunez: What role did you play in the Obama administration?

Martinez: I consider disability an issue that is important to both political parties. From 2009 – 2015 I served as the Assistant Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor, Office of Disability Employment Policy.

I also worked for President George W. Bush’s administration for seven years,    serving as a member of the National Council on Disability and as a member of the U.S. Department of State Advisory Committee on Disability and Foreign Policy.

Nunez: What advice do you have for Latinas who are navigating both a disability and building lasting careers?

Martinez: Find a mentor and set high expectations and goals for yourself. I have had mentors with and without disabilities, men, women, and people of all ethnicities and backgrounds, and have learned something from every one of them.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.