FDA Approves Genentech’s Lucentis (Ranibizumab Injection) For Diabetic Retinopathy

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Hispanic Family

The Leading Cause Of Blindness Among Working Age Adults In The United States

  • First and only medicine FDA-approved to treat all forms of diabetic retinopathy
  • Granted Priority Review Designation by the FDA based on analysis of results from a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded collaborative group study

South San Francisco, Calif. – April, 2017 – Genentech, a member of the Roche Group (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY), recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Lucentis® (ranibizumab injection) 0.3 mg for the monthly treatment of all forms of diabetic retinopathy. The most common cause of vision loss in people with diabetes, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of blindness among adults aged 20 to 741 and affects nearly 7.7 million people in the U.S.2

With this approval, Lucentis becomes the first and only FDA-approved medicine to treat diabetic retinopathy in people who have been diagnosed either with or without diabetic macular edema (DME), a complication of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the back of the eye. In February 2015, Lucentis received FDA approval for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy in people with DME based on data from the pivotal RIDE and RISE Phase III clinical trials.

The FDA granted Lucentis Priority Review for the treatment of diabetic retinopathy without DME based on an analysis of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network’s (DRCR.net) Protocol S study. This NIH-funded study compared Lucentis treatment to panretinal laser treatment in diabetic retinopathy patients both with and without DME. In the analysis that supported this approval, patients with and without DME in the Lucentis group experienced improvements in the severity of their retinopathy. Adverse events were consistent with those seen in previous studies.

“Diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of vision loss among working-aged adults in the U.S. between the ages of 20 and 74. We are very pleased that Lucentis is now FDA-approved to treat retinopathy in people with and without DME,” said Sandra Horning, M.D., chief medical officer and head of Global Product Development. “In multiple clinical studies, Lucentis demonstrated a significant improvement of patients’ diabetic retinopathy, and it is the first and only anti-VEGF therapy approved to treat all forms of diabetic retinopathy.”

Priority Review Designation is granted to medicines that the FDA has determined to have the potential to provide significant improvements in the safety and effectiveness of the treatment of a serious disease. The FDA previously granted Lucentis Breakthrough Therapy Designation for diabetic retinopathy in 2014 based on the pivotal RIDE and RISE Phase III clinical trials. Breakthrough designation is intended to expedite the development and review of medicines with early evidence of potential clinical benefit in serious diseases and to help ensure that patients receive access to medicines as soon as possible.

Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the U.S.3 The longer a person has diabetes, especially if it is poorly controlled, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy and vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy occurs when blood vessels in the retina become damaged. This can cause vision loss or distortion when the abnormal vessels leak blood or fluid into the eye.1

About Protocol S

The Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network’s (DRCR.net) Protocol S study was a randomized, active-controlled study comparing Lucentis to a type of laser therapy called panretinal or scatter photocoagulation (PRP) in 305 patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy, including those with and without diabetic macular edema (DME). In the Lucentis group, patients received a baseline 0.5 mg intravitreal injection followed by three monthly intravitreal injections, after which treatment was guided by pre-specified re-treatment criteria.

In the analysis that supported the approval, 37.8 percent (n=56/148) of patients in the Lucentis group without baseline DME had a two-step or better improvement in their diabetic retinopathy and 28.4 percent (n=42/148) had a three-step or better improvement at two years, according to the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study-Diabetic Retinopathy Severity Scale (ETDRS-DRSS). In Lucentis-treated patients with baseline DME, 58.5 percent (n=24/41) had a two-step or better improvement in their diabetic retinopathy and 31.7 percent (n=13/41) had a three-step or better improvement at two years. Adverse events were similar to those seen in other Lucentis trials.

The DRCR.net is funded by the National Eye Institute, part of the National Institutes of Health. The DRCR.net is a collaborative network dedicated to facilitating multicenter clinical research of diabetic retinopathy, DME and associated conditions, and supports the identification, design and implementation of multicenter clinical research initiatives focused on diabetes-induced retinal disorders. The DRCR.net was formed in September 2002 and currently includes over 115 participating sites with over 400 physicians throughout the U.S. The Protocol S study was supported, in part, by Genentech as part of the company’s ongoing commitment to supporting independent research and collaboration to advance science.

About Lucentis

Lucentis is a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor designed to bind to and inhibit VEGF-A, a protein that is believed to play a critical role in the formation of new blood vessels (angiogenesis) and the hyperpermeability (leakiness) of the vessels.

Lucentis is FDA-approved for the treatment of patients with wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD), macular edema after retinal vein occlusion (RVO), diabetic macular edema (DME), diabetic retinopathy and myopic choroidal neovascularization (mCNV).

Lucentis was developed by Genentech, a member of the Roche Group. The company retains commercial rights in the U.S. and Novartis has exclusive commercial rights for the rest of the world.

Outside the U.S., Lucentis is approved in more than 110 countries to treat patients with wet AMD, for the treatment of DME, and due to macular edema secondary to both branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO), central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) and visual impairment due to choroidal neovascularization (CNV).

Lucentis Important Safety Information

Patients should not use Lucentis if they have an infection in or around the eye or are allergic to Lucentis or any of its ingredients. Lucentis is a prescription medication given by injection into the eye and it has side effects. Some Lucentis patients have had detached retinas and serious infections inside the eye. If the eye becomes red, sensitive to light, or painful, or if there is a change in vision, patients should call or visit an eye doctor right away.

Some patients have had increased eye pressure before and within one hour of an injection.

Uncommonly, Lucentis patients have had serious, sometimes fatal problems related to blood clots, such as heart attacks or strokes. Fatal events were seen more often in patients with diabetic macular edema and diabetic retinopathy with Lucentis compared with patients who did not receive Lucentis.

Serious side effects include inflammation inside the eye and, rarely, problems related to the injection procedure such as cataracts. These side effects can make vision worse.

The most common eye-related side effects are increased redness in the white of the eye, eye pain, small specks in vision and increased eye pressure. The most common non-eye-related side effects are nose and throat infections, headache, lung/airway infections, and nausea.

Patients may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or

http://www.fda.gov/medwatch. Patients may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555.

For additional safety information, please see Lucentis full Prescribing Information, available here: http://www.gene.com/download/pdf/lucentis_prescribing.pdf

About Genentech in Ophthalmology

Genentech’s vision for ophthalmology is to bring innovative therapeutics to people with eye diseases. Currently, the company is conducting Phase III clinical trials for people with geographic atrophy (GA), an advanced form of AMD, as well as investigating platforms for sustained ocular drug delivery and a treatment for giant cell arteritis, a form of vasculitis that can lead to blindness. Additional focus includes using bispecific antibodies to simultaneously address multiple targets for patients with AMD and diabetic eye disease.

About Genentech Access Solutions

Access Solutions is part of Genentech’s commitment to helping people access the Genentech medicines they are prescribed, regardless of their ability to pay. The team of in-house specialists at Access Solutions is dedicated to helping people navigate the access and reimbursement process, and to providing assistance to eligible patients in the United States who are uninsured or cannot afford the out-of-pocket costs for their medicine. To date, the team has helped more than 1.4 million patients access the medicines they need. Please contact Access Solutions (866) 4ACCESS/(866) 422-2377 or visit http://www.Genentech-Access.com for more information.

About Genentech
Founded 41 years ago, Genentech is a leading biotechnology company that discovers, develops, manufactures and commercializes medicines to treat patients with serious or life-threatening medical conditions. The company, a member of the Roche Group, has headquarters in South San Francisco, California. For additional information about the company, please visit http://www.gene.com.

U.S. Hispanic Population Reaches Record High

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Happy family running in the park

Latinos account for 52 percent of all U.S. population growth

By Antonio Flores, Mark Hugo Lopez and Jens Manuel Krogstad

The U.S. Hispanic population reached a record 59.9 million in 2018, up 1.2 million over the previous year and up from 47.8 million in 2008, according to newly released U.S. Census Bureau population estimate.

Over the past decade, however, population growth among Hispanics has slowed as the annual number of births to Hispanic women has declined and immigration has decreased, particularly from Mexico.

Even so, Latinos remain an important part of the nation’s overall demographic story. Between 2008 and 2018, the Latino share of the total U.S. population increased from 16 percent to 18 percent. Latinos accounted for about half (52 percent) of all U.S. population growth over this period.

Here are some key facts about how the nation’s Latino population has changed over the past decade:

—Population growth among U.S. Hispanics has slowed since the 2000s. From 2005 to 2010, the nation’s Hispanic population grew by an average of 3.4 percent per year, but this rate has declined to 2.0 percent a year since then. Even so, population growth among Hispanics continues to outpace that of some other groups. The white population saw negligible growth between 2015 and 2018, while the black population had annual average growth of less than 1 percent over the same period. Only Asian Americans have seen faster population growth than Hispanics, with a 2.8 percent growth rate between 2015 and 2018. (All racial groups are single race, non-Hispanic.)

—The South saw the fastest Latino population growth of any U.S. region. The Latino population in the South grew 33 percent during this period, reaching 22.7 million in 2018, up 5.6 million from 2008. This growth was part of a broader increase in the Latino population in regions across the country since the 1990s. States in the Northeast (25 percent increase), Midwest (24 percent) and West (19 percent) also experienced growth in the number of Latinos from 2008 to 2018.

—The states with the fastest Hispanic population growth tend to have relatively small Hispanic populations—and are not in the South. North Dakota’s Hispanic population grew by 135 percent between 2008 and 2018—from 12,600 to 29,500, the fastest growth rate of any state. However, the state ranked 49th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia in its overall Hispanic population in 2018. Hispanic populations in South Dakota (75 percent), the District of Columbia (57 percent), Montana (55 percent) and New Hampshire (50 percent) also experienced rapid growth during this period, though all have relatively small Hispanic populations.

—Los Angeles County had more Hispanics than any other U.S. county, with 4.9 million in 2018. The next largest were Harris County, Texas (2.0 million), and Miami-Dade County, Florida (1.9 million). Overall, 11 counties had more than a million Hispanics in 2018; these include Maricopa County, Arizona; Cook County, Illinois; and Riverside County, California. In 102 U.S. counties, Hispanics made up at least 50 percent of the population in 2018

—Puerto Rico’s population declined nearly 4 percent in 2018 and is down about 15 percent since 2008. The island’s population stood at 3.2 million in 2018, down from 3.3 million in 2017, when hurricanes Maria and Irma hit. The two disasters led many Puerto Ricans to leave for the U.S. mainland, especially Florida. Even before the hurricanes, however, the island’s population had experienced a steady, long-term population decline due to a long-standing economic recession.

—Latinos are among the youngest racial or ethnic groups in the U.S. but saw one of the largest increases in median age over the past decade. Latinos had a median age of 30 in 2018, up from 27 in 2008. Whites had the highest median age nationally—44 in 2018—followed by Asians (37) and blacks (34). The median age for both Latinos and whites has increased by three years since 2008, tying for the largest uptick of any racial or ethnic group.

Source:  Pewresearch.org

Meet Dulce Candy: A Beauty Influencer Empowering Women

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Dulce Candy headshot

By Samar Khoury

Dulce Candy, one of the top lifestyle & beauty content creators online, is an inspiration to women who aspire to be entrepreneurs. Dulce, a successful businesswoman, published author, and Iraq War Veteran, spoke with HISPANIC Network Magazine about her journey.

HISPANIC Network Magazine (HNM): Tell us about your background. How did serving in the U.S. Army influence your decision to become a Beauty Influencer?

Dulce Candy (DC): I was born in Mexico, Michoacan. I immigrated to the U.S. in 1994 at age 6 with my Mom and two sisters at the time. I was raised in Oxnard, California. After graduating from high school, I chose to enlist active duty in the U.S. Army because I was looking for an opportunity to start a new life and make my parents proud.

HNM: What inspired you to start your own YouTube channel? Who is your beauty inspiration?

DC: For 15 months of my deployment in Baghdad, Iraq, I was forbidden to wear any civilian clothing or makeup, rightfully so. Because of the lack of self-expression, a burning desire to express my individuality was born. I never knew how much fashion and beauty meant to me until it was taken away completely. When I arrived back in the states in 2009 after my deployment, I discovered the tiny “Beauty” community online!

At that time, there were only about 100 beauty channels with only about 20 getting all the shine, and with members of the Latinx community leading less than 10 beauty channels. Starting my YouTube channel has been one of the most important choices I’ve ever made in my life. It allowed my passion for my hobby of beauty to flourish and turn into a thriving career that is still going strong 11 years later.

My beauty inspiration at the moment is more of a “look” than a person. I am all about the dewy and real skin glam. The type of look that enhances one’s natural beauty that radiates from within. This includes soft, bushy eyebrows, glowing skin, shimmery eyes, and glossy lips.

HNM: What have you accomplished through your YouTube channel? How has your channel inspired others?

DC: I am blessed beyond my wildest dreams! One of my most significant accomplishments was publishing my first self-help book titled The Sweet Life, moderating a town hall with Hillary Clinton, and starring in a Target commercial. My hope with my channel is to inspire other young women not to let their past or where they come from define them. I also hope to encourage young women not to be afraid of using their powerful voice to convey what they want. To also live life unapologetically and on their own terms.

HNM: How many social media campaigns have you been a part of?
DC: I have been so fortunate to partner with so many of my favorite brands over the past 11 years since I started my channel!

HNM: Tell us about the brands you’ve worked with. 

DC: I am blessed to have worked with numerous brands throughout the years! Some of my favorites include my face and lip palettes collaboration with Pixi Beauty, which was sold in Target stores. Also, over the years, I have had the opportunity to travel the world with different brands, and really loved trips to Costa Rica and London with different brand partners. In 2018, I also worked with an organization called Global Glow to empower young girls in numerous communities to advocate for themselves, use their voice to create their own opportunities and affect change in their communities. I enjoyed the partnership because I was able to use my platform to shed light on an organization whose mission aligned with my personal values and beliefs!

HNM: What else do you hope to accomplish, and what other changes would you like to see?

DC: I hope we continue to celebrate diversity so that young people can see themselves represented in an authentic way that makes them feel like they matter and that they too are beautiful in their own unique way.

HNM: What’s next on your agenda?

DC: My husband and I made the decision to expand our family and go through with IVF, and I recently found out that I am pregnant! I am very excited to go through the pregnancy journey! I also want to remain focused on self-growth, family, and continue to share my journey and experiences with my audience to inspire others!

For more information on this inspirational beauty mogul, visit Dulce’s website: dulcecandy.com

Follow Dulce Candy on Twitter, Instagram @dulcecandy and YouTube at Dulce Candy.

In Helping His Dad With Diabetes, Young Mexican Chemist Pioneers Healthy—and Cheap—Sugar Substitute

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Javier Larragoiti and team working in the Xilinat lab

When 18-year old Javier Larragoiti was told his father had been diagnosed with diabetes, the young man, who had just started studying chemical engineering at college in Mexico City, decided to dedicate his studies to finding a safe, sugar-alternative for his father.

“My dad tried to use stevia and sucralose, just hated the taste, and kept cheating on his diet,” Larragoiti told The Guardian. Stevia and sucralose are both popular sugar alternatives, and many reduced-sugar products available today contain one or the other.

With stevia and sucralose out of the picture, the young chemist needed to keep searching. He started dabbling with xylitol, a sweet-tasting alcohol found in birch wood but also in many fruits and vegetables. Xylitol is used in sugar-free products such as chewing gum and also in children’s medicine, but is toxic to dogs even in small amounts.

“It has so many good properties for human health, and the same flavor as sugar, but the problem was that producing it was so expensive,” said Larragoiti. “So I decided to start working on a cheaper process to make it accessible to everyone.”

Xylitol Made Cheaper

Corn is Mexico’s largest agricultural crop, and Javier has now patented a method of extracting xylitol from discarded corn cobs. Best of all, with 28 million metric tons of corn cobs generated every year in Mexico as waste, there’s no shortage of xylitol-generating fuel.

Simultaneously, Larragoiti hit on the idea of how to make xylitol less expensive, while inventing a way to reuse the 28 million tons of corn cobs, substantially upgrading the traditional means of disposal: burning them.

Especially in a pollution-heavy country like Mexico, reducing the amount of corn waste burned, would eliminate a portion of the carbon emissions.

His business, Xilinat, buys waste from 13 local farmers, producing 1 ton of the product each year. His invention was awarded a prestigious $310,000 Chivas Venture prize award, which will enable him to industrialize his operation and scale up production 10-fold, diverting another 10 tons of corn cob from the furnace.

Continue on to the Good News Network to read the complete article.

2019 Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers National Convention

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SHPE Logo

Join the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) for their 2019 National Convention in Phoenix, Arizona from October 30 – November 3. Attend the largest gathering of Hispanics in STEM!

This annual event brings together the largest number of Hispanic STEM professionals in the U.S. The theme for this year’s convention is “The Power of Transformation,” celebrating the evolution of SHPE, the empowerment of its members, and the elevation of Hispanics in STEM.

Enjoy a career fair with 275+ top companies & graduate schools, professional networking opportunities, educational sessions with leading experts and world class speakers from Fortune 500 companies.

SHPE changes lives by empowering the Hispanic community to realize its fullest potential and to impact the world through STEM awareness, access, support and development.

There are multiple conferences available from which to choose, so pick the sessions that are right for you! Pre-College, Academic, Professionals, SHPEtinas, Technology & Innovation.

Curious to see more about what goes on at the largest gathering of Hispanics in STEM? Check out the highlight reel from our 2018 convention in Cleveland, OH.

A special thank you to Visionary Sponsor – Honeywell!

For more information please visit SHPE2019.ORG and be sure to follow the hashtag #SHPE2019 on social media for the latest convention news!

Labels Don’t Define Who You Are

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group of professional Latinx employees

By Mona Lisa Faris

While it’s not a new word, we’re hearing “Latinx” more and more. Politicians are using the word more frequently—in fact, during the first Democratic debate this year, Senator Elizabeth Warren used it in her opening remarks.

Since its conception, “Latinx” is now a “hot” label. What does “Latinx” mean, and why is there so much controversy surrounding it? Basically, “Latinx” is a gender-neutral term used in lieu of “Latino” or “Latina” to refer to a person of Latin-American descent. Using the term “Latinx” to refer to all people of Latin-American descent has become more common as members in the LGBTQ+ community and its advocates have embraced the label.

The word was created as a gender-neutral alternative to “Latinos,” not only to better include those who are gender fluid but also to push back on the inherently masculine term used to describe all genders in the Spanish language.

I have to agree with George Cadava, director of the Latina and Latino Studies program at Northwestern University, when he said, “Latinx is an even further evolution that was meant to be inclusive of people who are queer or lesbian or gay or transgender.”

The U.S. Census Bureau still uses “Hispanic” and defines it as the “heritage, nationality, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before arriving in the United States.” For the past 30 years, we here call ourselves HISPANIC Network Magazine to encompass Latin, Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Chicano, and any Spanish-speaking country.

As we’re sensitive to all the different cultures and labels, we have something for everyone. We are proud to bring you the powerful, beautiful and talented Puerto Rican Afro-Latina—La La Anthony. Read our interview with this superstar and how she uses philanthropy to power her causes.

Don’t let the labels stop you from voting, reading this magazine or being who you who you are. Until the next word comes, remember, labels don’t define who you are.

4 Podcasts for Your Daily Commute

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young woman driving with window down and smiling

Get the scoop on jobs, lifestyle, and more! Podcasts have taken the world by storm.

Instead of listening to music on the way to and from work, most people are listening to their favorite podcasts.

Many cover topics like true crime, comedy, sports and recreation, society and culture, and arts and business.

“Podcast” was formed by combining “iPod” and “broadcast”.

Many different mobile applications allow people to subscribe and to listen to podcasts.

Check out these podcasts that give you business advice and teach you about food, family, history, and more.
 

Mucho Success

Mucho Success: Advice and Success Secrets for Latinos

How can Latinos become more successful? Learn the secrets of the most influential people and apply them to your life. Join corporate executive, entrepreneur, and business coach José Piñero as he interviews fascinating leaders and brings inspiring stories, lessons, and advice to empower and elevate Latinos.

Source: The Cultivation Company

Wait, Hold Up

Wait, Hold Up!

This podcast is for everyone trying to live their best lives but need some support, encouragement, and most importantly, dope girlfriends. Jess and Yarel are there to hash out their own real-life moments as well as get into those ‘wait, hold up!’ moments with their guests! Each episode offers something new, whether they’re diving into topics like careers, spirituality, personal development, or wellness.

Source: Wait, Hold Up! Podcast

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch provides a digital media platform that reflects the intersectionality between queer, Latinx, and Spanglish voices in an Anglo-dominated podcast world. FavyFav and Babelito approach the topics of identity, food, family, and history in a responsible yet humorous way.

Source: Latinos Who Lunch

Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina is an interview podcast hosted by Alicia Menendez and executive produced by Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. Menendez said, “Less than a year ago, when we first launched Latina to Latina, we produced what the two of us wanted and needed: a space for Latinas to talk about their lives and professional journeys. What we’ve learned from our listeners is that they wanted and needed this more than we even imagined. Yes, they are looking for inspiration, but we routinely hear that the sense of belonging and community is what keeps them listening week after week.”

Source: Latina to Latina

Eva Longoria Honored With Beacon Award At 13th Annual ADCOLOR Awards Ceremony In Los Angeles

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Eva Longoria accepts Beacon Award onstage

Each year, the ADCOLOR Awards ceremony recognizes individuals making strides in the fields of marketing, advertising, public relations, media and entertainment, in diversity and inclusion.

For its 13th annual celebration—hosted by New York Times best-selling author Luvvie Ajayi and presented by Facebook, Google, YouTube, Microsoft and Omnicom Group—honored philanthropist, actress, producer and director of UnbeliEVAble Entertainment (and Haute Living cover star), Eva Longoria, among others.

Each of the nominees and honorees are carefully and thoughtfully chosen from a large pool of change makers in each of their respective industries. The winner in each category is the one who represents ADCOLOR’s motto best, which is “Rise Up and Reach Back.” They are honored not just for the accomplishments in their own careers, but also how they are able to give back to their community. The organization’s goal is to “create a network of diverse professionals to encourage and celebrate one another.”

There is no better honoree to set the tone of Adweek’s inaugural Beacon Award than Eva Longoria,” said Lisa Granatstein, Editor, SVP, Programming, Adweek. “From her formidable seven-year-old Eva Longoria Foundation that empowers Latinas via STEM education and entrepreneurship to her leadership role calling for diversity in Hollywood, Eva’s remarkable accomplishments are both authentic and action-oriented.”

The inaugural Beacon Award honors talent who uses their celebrity as a catalyst to change the status quo in the quest for diversity and inclusion. In May, ADCOLOR and Adweek partnered on the first Champion awards and celebration recognizing the fearless leaders and rising stars in marketing and media who embody ADCOLOR’s call to “Rise Up. Reach Back.”

Continue on to Haute Living to read the complete article.

Mexican Scientist Creates Biodegradable Plastic Straw From Cactus

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Sandra Ortiz stands in kitchen behind table filled with vaiations of her new plastic

Researchers from the University of Valle de Atemajac in Zapopan, Mexico have created a biodegradable plastic from the juice of the prickly pear cactus.

The new material begins to break down after sitting in the soil for a month and when left in water, it breaks down in a matter of days. Plus, it doesn’t require crude oil like traditional plastics.

“There were some publications that spoke of different materials with which biodegradable plastics could be made, including some plants,” Sandra Pascoe Ortiz, the research professor who developed the material, told Forbes.

“In this case the nopal cactus has certain chemical characteristics with which I thought it could be feasible to obtain a polymer, that if it was combined with some other substances, all of them natural, a non-toxic biodegradable plastic would be obtained. The process is a mixture of compounds whose base is the nopal. It’s totally non-toxic, all the materials we use could be ingested both by animals or humans and they wouldn’t cause any harm.”

This means that even if any of this material made its way into the ocean, it will safely dissolve. It’s estimated that between 1.15 million to 2.41 million tonnes of plastic are entering the ocean each year from rivers. Last month, divers found a plastic KFC bag from the 1970s during an ocean clean-up off the waters off Bulcock Beach in Queensland, Australia and earlier this year, during a dive to the bottom of the Mariana Trench – the deepest point in the ocean – a plastic bag was found.

According to Ortiz, the project was born in a science Fair of the The nopal cactus sitting on table with blender in the backgroundDepartment of Exact Sciences and Engineering, in the chemistry class with industrial engineering students of the career. They began to make some attempts to obtain a plastic using cactus as raw material.

“From that I decided to start a research project in a formal way. Currently in the project collaborate researchers from the University of Guadalajara in conjunction with the University of Valle de Atemajac.”

Continue on to Forbes to read the complete article.

Recognizing Hispanic Heritage

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Hispanic Heritage Month

From September 15 to October 15 in the United States, people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the group’s heritage and culture.

Monday, September 16 is Mexican Independence Day. Early on the morning of September 16, 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla summoned the largely Indian and mestizo congregation of his small Dolores parish church and urged them to take up arms and fight for Mexico’s independence from Spain.

His El Grito de Dolores, or Cry of Dolores, which was spoken—not written—is commemorated on September 16 as Mexican Independence Day.

Hispanics constitute 17.6% of the nation’s total population.

By 2060, the Hispanic population is projected to increase to 119 million.

As we celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, we recognize some of the contributions to trending Hispanic lifestyle, business and entertainment.

 

Eva Longoria Presents Eva’s Kitchen
Actress, New York Times bestselling cookbook author, and Texas-native Eva Longoria continued her partnership with FoodStory Brands, a family-owned Arizona-based company, to bring her recipes to life. Longoria collaborated with FoodStory Brands’ Fresh Cravings to create an authentic, fresh-tasting, Texas-inspired salsa, Eva’s Kitchen Cantina Style Salsa. Source: Fresh Cravings
Selena Gomez Tackles Swimwear
Selena Gomez is taking on a new title: swimwear designer. Gomez, already a notable fashion designer with her Coach line, teamed up with former assistant Theresa Marie Mingus and swimwear line Krahs. Gomez created the “Selena” suit, a high-waisted bottoms and bra-style top that was partially inspired by her kidney transplant scar. She also contributed a one-piece zip-up suit. Source: teenvogue.com
Gaby Natale Makes History With 4th Consecutive Daytime EMMY Nomination
Triple Daytime EMMY® winner Gaby Natale made history last spring when the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences nominated the SuperLatina host to a fourth consecutive Daytime EMMY® Award in the Outstanding Daytime Talent in a Spanish Language Program category. Source: AGANAR Media
Emilio and Gloria Estefan Receive 2019 Gershwin Prize
Husband-and-wife team Emilio and Gloria Estefan were the recipients of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. The honorees represent two firsts for the prize – they are the first married couple and first recipients of Hispanic descent to receive the award. Source: blogs.loc.gov
Hispanic Audiences Drove ‘La Llorona’ To $26.5M.

The Curse of La Llorona beat the $15M–$17M domestic tracking with a $26.5M weekend win largely built on Hispanic audiences turning up at 49 percent. With a release in 71 territories, making it the No. 1 pic abroad and in Latin America, Llorona’s global purse stands at $56.5M. hispanicprblog.com

Dora the Explorer Now Live Action!
The live action version of animated series Dora the Explorer—Dora and The Lost City of Gold—debuted in August. The film stars Eva Longoria, Michael Peña, and Isabela Moner. Source: deadline.com

The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) National Convention is Coming to Albuquerque in September

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USHCC National Convention logo

The USHCC National Convention coming to Albuquerque, New Mexico on September 29th – October 1st, is the largest networking venue for Hispanic businesses in America.

For over a generation, the USHCC has served as the nation’s leading Hispanic Business organization, working to bring more than 4.37 million Hispanic owned businesses to the forefront of the national economic agenda.

The National Convention brings together Hispanic business owners, corporate executives and members of more than 200 local Hispanic chambers of commerce from across the country.

It offers the opportunity to establish strategic long-lasting business partnerships, through dialogue, networking, workshops, and more.

Business Matchmaking:
Matchmaking sessions are designed to provide a platform for Hispanic Business Enterprises (HBEs) to meet and engage in new business opportunities by introducing their companies and services to participating corporations. Tailored to help HBEs from across the country to meet with top corporations awarding contracts, the USHCC Business Matchmaking facilitates one-on-one meetings for Hispanic-owned businesses with procurement officials from industries ranging from energy, telecom, financial services and more.

There is no additional cost to attend the Matchmaking, a separate registration is required.

Business Matchmaking will take place on Tuesday, October 1st from 2:00 PM – 5:00 PM.

New this year is the added Supplier-Ready program component to prepare all Business Matchmaking participants with educational webinars from supplier diversity professionals and helpful tips to maximize their business matchmaking experience.

View highlights from last year’s convention below:

Continue on to ushcc.com to read more.